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In some situations, you have to place TV outside for some usage. Some people may choose to buy an outdoor TV. But any standard outdoor television will cost you nothing less than $1450 for a 32-inch screen. Some may be even more expensive. Then how to work out this situation?

Firstly, Buy an indoor TV that can withstand some heat.

The major problem with indoor TVs being used outside is protecting it from heat and higher temperatures. There are a variety of television models that are mainly created to withstand wider operating temperatures better than the others in the market. And these are the kind of television sets that you ought to be investing in if you have a knack of using indoor TVs outside. Panasonic, the multinational electronics corporation, produces TVs that have the ability to combat temperatures up to 95 degrees Fahrenheit, which is 35 degrees Celsius, while electronics giants such as Samsung and LG manufacture TVs that rate up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit, 40 degrees Celsius. You can easily check the temperature of the television on the manufacturer’s website. A precautionary method that you can use in order to make sure that your indoor TV lasts longer is to keep the TV back in the house when you’re not using it.So keeping the TV away from the sun as much as possible can contribute to its durability.

Another method is to use a waterproof cover.

While indoor television sets are not designed to be regularly used outside the house, using a waterproof cover nevertheless increases the chances of its survival out in the open. The operational functions of an indoor television can get immensely affected due to moisture and humidity, so, naturally, a waterproof cover protects the TV against these elements and even light rain. Unlike outdoor TVs, indoor televisions are not weatherproof in any way, so using a cover, especially a waterproof cover keeps it protected not only from moisture and rain but also from insects, bugs, spiders and other elements of nature that can prove to be destructive for an indoor TV.

And you can also try to buy a mobile Loctek TV cart.

This is the simplest solution for using an indoor TV outside the house while not reducing the lifespan of the television. With a Loctek mobile TV cart, you have the guiltless opportunity to enjoy watching movies outside, anywhere you want. Loctek TV cart will require some extension cords but that doesn’t seem so daunting if you really enjoy watching TV outside the house, like on the porch or the pool. It’s well-constructed ability to move around quite easily is a unique factor which makes this convenient piece of furniture the best solution for using an indoor TV anywhere outside the house.
 

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We're in the process of buying a house in South Florida, and one of the things that I noticed when we looked around was the setup of a TV and speaker setup outside. At first due to the size of the casing, I thought it was either one of those dedicated outdoor TVs that cost the earth, or a dedicated cover... but on closer inspection (and a quick chat with the current homeowner) it's actually just an older model Vizio with nothing special about it. It's under a hardwood ceiling but still open to the elements and apparently has handled the situation fine. It can hit around 90f here and the humidity is through the roof, but I'm definitely going to go a similar path (or keep the current TV there if they don't take it with them) rather than initially invest a lot of money into this endeavor.
 

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Great info how well do you think a tv would last under a 10 awning? Awning faces east so majority of the wind and rain is going to get blocked by the house and I would take it down during winter months. Going to buying a cover for it when not in use
 

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Great info how well do you think a tv would last under a 10 awning? Awning faces east so majority of the wind and rain is going to get blocked by the house and I would take it down during winter months. Going to buying a cover for it when not in use
I have a Vizio M Series TV under a covered deck. The back is against the outside wall of the house, and it is sheltered from direct rain, direct sun, and high winds. I take it inside during the winter and keep it on the deck from early May to late October. I've had it there for 3 years with no problems so far.

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