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Mark is a well respected observer of the digital television scene, and his comments are always interesting.


I fully agree with this article.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As do I... that doesn't make it any less disturbing.


The fact that everyone has to replace their television by 2007 or they are SOL worries me. The last I had read we needed a $30 set top box by 2006. Now it will be mandatory to upgrade to a DTV by 2007. I understand this effects us less (being early adopters), but doesn't this seem wrong to anyone here? Am I misunderstanding the article? To me it reads no devices can carry an analog output after 2005, and that the analog signals will be dropped in 2007; therefore, an NTSC set top box cannot exist after 2005. Everyone MUST buy a DTV.
 

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I read what Mark has to say on technical issues carefully.


In this case he is adding to the confusion.


The hearings made clear that this "draft legislation" was designed to provoke comments not votes. A number of representatives made it clear that voting for these two points would be voting themselves out of office.


The pace of the conversion is going to be decided by consumers not Congress.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by KilgoreT
The fact that everyone has to replace their television by 2007 or they are SOL worries me. The last I had read we needed a $30 set top box by 2006. Now it will be mandatory to upgrade to a DTV by 2007.
If I understand the draft legislation properly, the production of STBs with analog outputs would be banned in 2006. Also banned would be disabling/degrading analog outputs on STBs without digital connections (i.e., the proposed down-rezing of materials if you didn't have a secure connection.) This means that the legislation is A) worthless for protecting Hollywood, as every hacker will simply use a pre-2007 box and B) creating an unnatural demand for pre-2007 boxes as everyone not wanting to purchase a new DTV would need to buy one of these pre-2007 boxes.


It is, at best, an attempt by the legislature to protect the interests of early adopters by mandating that their equipment not be disabled in any way while also trying to protect the content providers from unauthorized duplication. Yet, as the article mentioned above states, video camera technology is getting better all the time and the next thing is to define your television as a device with "analog" outputs, i.e. the screen and speakers.
 

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Yeah, the total conversion to digital is gonna happen in that time frame. And all stations are broacasting digital as of last May! And I've got some hot property in central Florida for sale! ;-)


If even half of America has a digital set in 2007 I'll be surprised. The only way it will happen is through cable, where you "rent" the box.
 

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Unfortunately, Jack Valenti has not done the MPAA well in his representation. He is really holding us all back in terms of progress. He has a lot of friends in congress and too much power.

The only thing for us to look forward to is that he is old and will not be representing them too much longer I hope.


Hopefully, the MPAA will then get somebody younger with more understanding of the publics need to keep copies of shows they have watched and paid for in some way (either by cash or watching commercials) or record HDTV shows while they are away to watch latter.

This means letting us archive digital copies.


I think that they have done the right thing with DVD in that the price point seems good enough that most people will find it onerous to copy them or buy cheap poor illegal copies (unlike the RIAA which has music CD prices way too high which is why MP3 copies are so popular).


Bette enforcement is really where they have to procced, not copy protection. Any form of copy protection will be broken only because there is always some kid (or chinease hacker) that wants to prove his intellectual prowness and computers with increasing power get increasingly cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Steven, I couldn't agree with you more!


Consumers want value, the RIAA hasn't come to terms with this. Of course, psychologically speaking, DVDs will often inherently seem more valuable because they add visual entertainment to the mix. I'm surprised the RIAA hasn't recognized this and changed their sales plan.


Of course the Holy Grail to all of these marketing geniuses is the ability to determine their pricing without the pirate and home taping factor in the way. Then they can move on to their pastime activity of world domination. :)
 
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