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Discussion Starter #1
Is there a blog or something I can read that quickly explains what the aspect ratio I should be aiming for?

I am purchasing items for a home theater and want a retractable screen for my projector. I am aiming for movie and TV show watching. Most of which will be either from Netflix or my custom FreeNAS server running Plex. I am ripping my Blu Ray collection in lossless 1:1 format to push to the projector. I might also try ripping 4K Blu Rays as well, or I may end up just purchasing a UHD player as a second input to the projector.

I am confused on the purpose or goal behind the aspect ratios for screens. Should I be going for just a basic 16:9 screen? What is the benefit of 2.25? or 2.40? If I went with that aspect ratio, how will it effect the content I am playing...will some stuff work and some stuff not? I am just trying to figure out what I am should be aiming for without diving too deep into it and requiring months of research and a PhD in video development.

Thanks!
 

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Is there a blog or something I can read that quickly explains what the aspect ratio I should be aiming for?

I am purchasing items for a home theater and want a retractable screen for my projector. I am aiming for movie and TV show watching. Most of which will be either from Netflix or my custom FreeNAS server running Plex. I am ripping my Blu Ray collection in lossless 1:1 format to push to the projector. I might also try ripping 4K Blu Rays as well, or I may end up just purchasing a UHD player as a second input to the projector.

I am confused on the purpose or goal behind the aspect ratios for screens. Should I be going for just a basic 16:9 screen? What is the benefit of 2.25? or 2.40? If I went with that aspect ratio, how will it effect the content I am playing...will some stuff work and some stuff not? I am just trying to figure out what I am should be aiming for without diving too deep into it and requiring months of research and a PhD in video development.

Thanks!
Aspect Ratio's can be confusing. Aspect ratios when we're talking movies are expressed in width to height. So for example a 16:9 screen expressed like we would a theater screen is 1.78:1. Which means for every 1 inch of height you will have 1.78 inches of width. Scope screens are generally 2.35:1 or 2.40:1 and the same applies except now you're going wider for every inch of height. If you notice any time we're expressing the ratios the height is the constant, thus the term constant image height.

So what AR do you want? Well if most of your viewing is films you may well be interested in a scope aspect ratio. Although there are around 20 IMAX films out there on Blu Ray and 4K Blu Ray the vast majority of the rest are either 2.40:1 (referred to as scope) or 1.85:1. As you can see numerically 1.85:1 is very close to 1.78:1 and that's why on most displays these films appear to fill the screen (the overscan of the display is enough that you don't see any bars). So a 16:9 screen is pretty well optimized for 1.85:1, so the big question is concerning wider ARs like 2.40:1 which make up about half of what is out there. Well I'll just give you some numbers on a screen of the same height to help you see the difference:

110" 16:9 screen has dimensions of 96" wide x 54" high. Here's the screen area of the picture in each case.

1.78:1 television program = 36 sq ft
2.40:1 film (which would be letterboxed) = 26.7 sq ft

So you can see right off that a scope movie like Blade Runner 2049 is quite a bit smaller than your average HD TV show. This is because the wider image is being shrunk into the narrower screen.

So let's look at this with a 140" 2.40:1 screen. It has the same 54" height but the width is now 130".

1.78:1 television program = 36 sq ft
2.40:1 film = 48.7 sq ft

So as you can see since the height is the same the narrower TV program image is exactly the same size. The scope film you were watching however is now massively bigger. Almost doubled in fact. This increase in impact and immersion is a big jump.

Going to the wider scope screen does require that you purchase a projector that supports lens memory to adjust for the various ARs or if desired an add on lens. So it's not as plug and play as a 16:9 screen. You could also manually zoom a projector (with enough zoom range) to switch ARs, but it's not something most find practical. And for that reason based on your viewing habits you may or may not find this worth it. There are also some that want the handful of IMAX films out there to be displayed larger than even scope based films and size their setups for this. Personally I have hundreds of films on DVD, Blu Ray and 4K with only 8 being IMAX so I don't see it as a worthwhile compromise to consider IMAX sizing. But everyone's different.

Another question that pops up is 2.35:1 vs. 2.40:1 for the screen AR. The actual difference is so small that I'd would say buy whichever you can find in your price range. I ended up with 2.35:1 because that was the vendor was selling for the money I wanted to invest. I wouldn't lose any sleep over either ratio.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Really great information. What would be the best option for a screen that is retractable, tab tensioned (I was told this was the best option to avoid warping), acoustically transparent (ideally), 2.40:1 and at least 120" in width (to cover the 2 TVs behind it).

I have not been able to find a screen that matches these specifications that isn't insanely expensive, or am I going to have to drop a ton of cash to get this?
 

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Really great information. What would be the best option for a screen that is retractable, tab tensioned (I was told this was the best option to avoid warping), acoustically transparent (ideally), 2.40:1 and at least 120" in width (to cover the 2 TVs behind it).

I have not been able to find a screen that matches these specifications that isn't insanely expensive, or am I going to have to drop a ton of cash to get this?
Honestly I haven't looked at screens in a while. You could ask @chriscmore with Seymour AV. I know a lot of folks that are happy with their product and I think they have some more affordable options.
 

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For retractable, tab tensioned, acoustically transparent, velvet bordered, US-made, they're as inexpensive as I can make them. We get over twice the price through the CEDIA brand S-SE.

Cheers,
Chris
 

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My recommendation is if you watch 16x9 to 2.00x1 content primarily(over75 percent), get a CIW/16x9 screen. If it’s widescreen 2.35 content then go CIH. Here’s a helpful visual guide.

 

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Discussion Starter #8
My recommendation is if you watch 16x9 to 2.00x1 content primarily(over75 percent), get a CIW/16x9 screen. If it’s widescreen 2.35 content then go CIH. Here’s a helpful visual guide.

The majority of the content I will be watching on it will be ripped Blu ray copies to a Plex Media Server (1:1 lossless MKV Passthrough format). Netflix shows, HBO shows, etc. I have never really paid attention the aspect ratio of movies or the shows on Netflix so I have no idea what my primary content is... This is my first projector, so everything thus far has been on flat panel TVs.
 

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The majority of the content I will be watching on it will be ripped Blu ray copies to a Plex Media Server (1:1 lossless MKV Passthrough format). Netflix shows, HBO shows, etc. I have never really paid attention the aspect ratio of movies or the shows on Netflix so I have no idea what my primary content is... This is my first projector, so everything thus far has been on flat panel TVs.
Depends on the content. Most new Netflix programming is 2.0:1, other content will be whatever the provider created it in. 2.0:1 isn't an issue you're using a projector with lens memory. You make a preset and you're done. The content is noticeably larger than what it would be on a 1.78:1 screen.

If most of your viewing is Blu Ray via Plex then it's safe to say you'll at least be viewing 50/50 scope and 1.85:1 films. It may skew higher one AR or another based on what you enjoy. Just as an example of all the Marvel films only 2 I believe are in 1.85:1 (The Avengers and Ant-Man), the rest are scope (some 3D versions may differ). But again as long you arrive at how tall you want your screen to be and size from there 1.85:1 and TV programming aren't any smaller. Scope is just larger.
 

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Back to your original question and after 10 or so answers it should be clear, what you don’t know yet you don’t know. The reason none of us knew the answer to your question also back when we got started is because we didn’t then know what we would like best. The answer is now that we know what we like best we may have different opinions of what is best though.

There is frequent advice given on the screen forum and I believe it to be solid advice and that is to not rush into buying a screen if you can and find a wall painted white or gray and experiment with sizes and AR (methods of presentation) for a month or two and find out for yourself your likes.

Projectors have one feature that no TV has and that is the zoom feature. Imagine a 55” TV that when you pushed a button it was an 85” and then you pushed it again and it was a 140”. That’s what you can do with a projector.

Movies come in all different shapes and sizes. As of right now the largest size is IMAX at an IMAX theater. At home the largest would be IMAX 1.89:1 AR. Your projector is most likely going to be 16:9 AR. If I didn’t know for sure what my likes were and didn’t have a painted wall to experiment on, I would buy a screen large enough to do every method of presentation on including IMAX 1.89 and in an AR that would allow that. Being as your projector will be 16:9 a 16:9 screen would match it perfectly. In no way does that mean everything you watch should be at full immersion just because you can.
 

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Again IMAX is a consideration, but there is so little content for it I wouldn't recommend sizing a screen based on what is likely 5% or less of what you watch.

The aspect ratio of the panel really doesn't matter much if you have a projector able to size the image based on the AR of the content and screen. The math above holds true and will apply for the majority of what you watch. The only time the native panel AR is obtrusive is when you're at the menu of a disc and the top and bottom spill off. Watching a scope film on a 16:9 screen feels a long way from perfect.
 

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I wasn’t recommending that size screen solely around IMAX 1.89 media alone. I was recommending it as a screen size the OP could use for any and all methods of presentation CIW, (not recommended by me) CIH of copies of motion pictures intended to be shown in commercial movie theaters. Perhaps CIA (constant image area) many enjoy such for these “Prestige TV” shows to some variant of CIA. Then there is “Merged Media” that is becoming quite popular. It is a form of “Prestige TV” that calls out to be enjoyed at and IMAX 1.89 level of immersion or something larger than CIA.

It sounds like quite a bit of the OP content will be something outside the realm of motion pictures intended to be shown in commercial movie theaters first.

It is only a suggestion if the OP has a good feel now for how immersive he wants to view Game of Thrones he should select a screen size that best lets him do that.

Coming to the CIH forum and asking a question about presentation for a newcomer he will clearly get a different response than if he asked the same question in the screen forum or even one of the projector forums. Every member of those forums are not frequent posters here because they have different likes. At this point the OP is trying to figure out where he belongs and there are many right choices. My right choice is clearly not the same as everyone here but that doesn’t make it wrong only that it is right for me. This poster needs a method of figuring this out.

I know it will be said if the OP buys a IMAX 16:9 screen and then finds they want a Scope screen they will have wasted their money. The same could be true if they buy a scope screen and then find they want CIA or want to watch the movie Dunkirk as true IMAX immersion. The truth is on the bigger screen they could watch all scope movies just like they could on the scope screen and they could still watch the previews or the special features or see the menus.
 

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I wasn’t recommending that size screen solely around IMAX 1.89 media alone. I was recommending it as a screen size the OP could use for any and all methods of presentation CIW, (not recommended by me) CIH of copies of motion pictures intended to be shown in commercial movie theaters. Perhaps CIA (constant image area) many enjoy such for these “Prestige TV” shows to some variant of CIA. Then there is “Merged Media” that is becoming quite popular. It is a form of “Prestige TV” that calls out to be enjoyed at and IMAX 1.89 level of immersion or something larger than CIA.

It sounds like quite a bit of the OP content will be something outside the realm of motion pictures intended to be shown in commercial movie theaters first.

It is only a suggestion if the OP has a good feel now for how immersive he wants to view Game of Thrones he should select a screen size that best lets him do that.

Coming to the CIH forum and asking a question about presentation for a newcomer he will clearly get a different response than if he asked the same question in the screen forum or even one of the projector forums. Every member of those forums are not frequent posters here because they have different likes. At this point the OP is trying to figure out where he belongs and there are many right choices. My right choice is clearly not the same as everyone here but that doesn’t make it wrong only that it is right for me. This poster needs a method of figuring this out.

I know it will be said if the OP buys a IMAX 16:9 screen and then finds they want a Scope screen they will have wasted their money. The same could be true if they buy a scope screen and then find they want CIA or want to watch the movie Dunkirk as true IMAX immersion. The truth is on the bigger screen they could watch all scope movies just like they could on the scope screen and they could still watch the previews or the special features or see the menus.
Then he can ask in those forums. You're adding needless confusion here. Again you proceed on the false assumption that people with a CIH setup are purposefully hamstringing their presentation with narrower ARs. Several posters in this forum have stated repeatedly that we have our screen height as tall as we want it, yet you ignore this and continually insinuate we have a diminished experience with prestige television or IMAX viewing. We don't. Accept this and move on. We don't need every thread in this forum degrading into your vision of how to watch things.

Watching any 1.78:1 TV program (prestige or otherwise) on a height optimized CIH screen will not looking any different than it would on a CIW screen with that same height. No one in here has stated anything about IMAX except that it is the only format intended by filmmakers to be viewed taller than scope and it makes up a very little of the available content. Thus sizing your screen on it is not advised. If the OP finds that a different AR screen fits their needs better, no arguments here.
 

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I have never once said your approach is not perfect for you. All I am merely saying is it may not be perfect for everyone. I’m not trying to confuse the OP rather I’m trying to show him all the options as fairly as I can as that’s what he wanted to hear the pros and the CONS. I actually did try and steer him once when I told him I didn’t recommend CIW as it is nothing more than a giant TV set and doesn’t benefit from the zoom feature his projector will most likely have.

We have no idea about the OP if he likes to sit in the back row of the movie theater or if he has ever seen IMAX level immersion. We only know he is new to front projection and trying to figure it out enough so he can decide what he likes. If he is like 90% of first time FP users within the first year he will wish he had gone more immersive than he did. We have no idea if his room is deep and wide with lower ceilings and he’s trying to fit 16 seats or more into the room or if he has high ceilings and a narrow room with just 2 to 4 seats he can place anywhere he wants from the screen. All these things would factor into the decision making process.

Another important factor we don’t know yet is how bothersome unmasked areas of the screen will be to the OP. In all methods of presentation there will be times the screen will not be full of image. If the OP is deeply bothered by gray/ black bars then he will need some sort of masking method and that is not as easy on a retractable screen.

I am in no way trying to tell the OP what he likes. I’m trying to show him how to find out what he likes, ether by doing it or reading about the process of doing it and maybe that alone would be enough.

To the OP get a roll of blue painters tape and a couple lawn chairs and go out to the garage and put some image sizes up there according to the room you will be using and set the chairs the distance you will be sitting try out all the common options such as CIW,CIH and even CIA and CIH+IMAX1.89. Look at each one and picture some of the movies and shows you will be watching on them and the relative size the image will be.

A great source of information is IMDb for instance if you watch the TV show Stranger Things go to that site and search on the name, then click on more, and select Technical Specs and you will get information on AR here is an example.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4574334/technical?ref_=tt_ql_dt_6
Now you can think about what size that show will be when it fits into your different screen AR’s.
 

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The word immersion is way over used today. Your field of view is closer to CIH than any other shape of screen. IMAX VAR movies make up about .001 percent of movies and in almost all of those cases it adds nothing. It is a “hey look, this is why you paid more for your ticket”. If you want to be immersive do focus on picture fidelity, content framing and personal preference. CIH is the correct way to display all content.
 

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I have never once said your approach is not perfect for you.
Didn't say you did. I said you continue to discuss things as if frequent posters using CIH are compromising their viewing of other aspect ratios. You need to stop doing this.

All I am merely saying is it may not be perfect for everyone. I’m not trying to confuse the OP rather I’m trying to show him all the options as fairly as I can as that’s what he wanted to hear the pros and the CONS.
So inventing terms like "prestige television". "Merged media" and "IMAX like immersion" are clearing things up?

And stating this:

Being as your projector will be 16:9 a 16:9 screen would match it perfectly.
followed by this:

I actually did try and steer him once when I told him I didn’t recommend CIW as it is nothing more than a giant TV set and doesn’t benefit from the zoom feature his projector will most likely have.
Yup perfectly clear to someone just reading this thread. Granted those of us who have suffered through enough of your soapbox rhetoric understand you likely meant to reserve the full majesty of that 16:9 screen to IMAX or things you happen to like (with the rest either letterboxed or floating in the middle), but it's still anything but clear to a new poster.

We have no idea about the OP if he likes to sit in the back row of the movie theater or if he has ever seen IMAX level immersion. We only know he is new to front projection and trying to figure it out enough so he can decide what he likes. If he is like 90% of first time FP users within the first year he will wish he had gone more immersive than he did. We have no idea if his room is deep and wide with lower ceilings and he’s trying to fit 16 seats or more into the room or if he has high ceilings and a narrow room with just 2 to 4 seats he can place anywhere he wants from the screen. All these things would factor into the decision making process.
If he comes back he can tell us more about the room, people will be happy to help. The question thus far is about ARs. Which was being answered fine up until we got derailed with this. IMAX was covered. Scope was covered. Flat was covered. And TV was covered. How they are intended by the filmmaker to be presented, covered.

Another important factor we don’t know yet is how bothersome unmasked areas of the screen will be to the OP. In all methods of presentation there will be times the screen will not be full of image. If the OP is deeply bothered by gray/ black bars then he will need some sort of masking method and that is not as easy on a retractable screen.
The only thing that really has the potential for visible bars in CIH is 1.37:1 Academy content. That and something like The Hateful Eight would have very thin letterbox bars (but since I can't think of more than a couple films you'd run into this on I doubt masking for it would be practical or needed). As for pillarboxing the other common ARs, they're not lit by the panel and therefore don't cause any issues.

I am in no way trying to tell the OP what he likes. I’m trying to show him how to find out what he likes, ether by doing it or reading about the process of doing it and maybe that alone would be enough.
Oh I don't know throwing out terms like perfect sure leans that way.

To the OP get a roll of blue painters tape and a couple lawn chairs and go out to the garage and put some image sizes up there according to the room you will be using and set the chairs the distance you will be sitting try out all the common options such as CIW,CIH and even CIA and CIH+IMAX1.89. Look at each one and picture some of the movies and shows you will be watching on them and the relative size the image will be.

A great source of information is IMDb for instance if you watch the TV show Stranger Things go to that site and search on the name, then click on more, and select Technical Specs and you will get information on AR here is an example.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4574334/technical?ref_=tt_ql_dt_6
Now you can think about what size that show will be when it fits into your different screen AR’s.
Taping out a screen is a good idea, but you also need to take into account seating to screen height to make sure what you're viewing in the garage will apply to the actual room. Probably ought to decide if you are enough of an IMAX fan to size screen for it before going through this process too. Yup a lot of movie sites have specs listed. I'm sure going forward the OP is likely to pay more attention to their viewing habits. That really should be the arbiter for what AR screen they buy.
 

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To the OP: I’m sincerely sorry for derailing your thread with factual information for you. Of course I was wrong in what I posted because in this forum even with someone new to front projection you should only be told the merits of using a 2.35:1 screen and nothing more.

It is really astonishing that with all the information out there how humans see everything inside a 2.35:1 rectangle the world adopted 16:9 (1.77:1) as the standard for the billions of TVs to be made, and foolish projector makers followed suit with this stupid 16:9 frame. A few tried to make a 2.35:1 projector by disabling the pixels on a 16:9 chip and charging something like $25k for the projector but that was short lived.

The information above by the other posters is correct about half the new movies being made each year are filmed using some process or other that the end result is a scope 2.35:1 movie. It is also true from the 1950’s till recent theaters showed movies in mostly 2 distinct AR’s scope and flat 2.35 & 1.85 to 1 respectively. They show both at the exact same height thus the scope is the widest and largest and the most immersive. It made a lot of sense for movie theaters to do that as all they had to do is close curtains from the sides and they were framed for one or the other. It is also a wonderful way to present movies at home. It is simple and efficient. When you buy your screen in the scope AR know that your projector will still be projecting a 16:9 image with black bars above and below your screen area. Depending how high your room is when you zoom out for scope the black bars will be possibly on the ceiling or wall below. You can buy your screen with additional black masking on it if your room works out for that and what your screen will be like is a 16:9 screen with the top and bottom painted black.

If for any reason you watch one of the .001% of the movies out there like Dunkirk some of the movie will go above and below the scope screen but you wont notice it because your vision is fixed around 2.35:1, so it might as well be behind you because you can’t even see it. It is very strange no one ever pointed that out to Christopher Nolan and others as all they are really doing is wasting film. Silly James Cameron fell for this nonsense also and made a movie called Avatar that played in a cropped to scope AR at theater that were not (LieMAX) then the dummy liked the LieMAX version better so he put it on BD that way. If you ever watch that movie just shrink it down to Flat and forget it was supposed to be scope. It will look fine.

Oh ya one other thing you can start practicing on even before you get your projector and screen is not moving your eyes when you watch a movie you need to keep them fixed right at the center of the screen no matter where the action on the screen is. The reason for this is simple your vision is around 2.35:1 if you go looking up at the top of the screen well then some of your vision might go up to the area above the screen that you cant see. We wouldn’t want that because it’s just black up there anyways.

That’s about it welcome to the world of CIH it is really the only way to do this correctly. :eek:
 

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It seems like the number 9 as a aspect ratio component is becoming more of a fixture. It does uncomplicated things for home use. With that being said all the content can be covered with 12x9 to 25x9.

12x9=1.33, 13x9=1.44, 15x9=1.66, 16x9=1.78, 17x9=1.89, 18x9=2.00, 20x9=2.20, 21x9=2.35, 23x9=2.55, 25x9=2.76.
 

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To the OP: I’m sincerely sorry for derailing your thread with factual information for you. Of course I was wrong in what I posted because in this forum even with someone new to front projection you should only be told the merits of using a 2.35:1 screen and nothing more.

It is really astonishing that with all the information out there how humans see everything inside a 2.35:1 rectangle the world adopted 16:9 (1.77:1) as the standard for the billions of TVs to be made, and foolish projector makers followed suit with this stupid 16:9 frame. A few tried to make a 2.35:1 projector by disabling the pixels on a 16:9 chip and charging something like $25k for the projector but that was short lived.

The information above by the other posters is correct about half the new movies being made each year are filmed using some process or other that the end result is a scope 2.35:1 movie. It is also true from the 1950’s till recent theaters showed movies in mostly 2 distinct AR’s scope and flat 2.35 & 1.85 to 1 respectively. They show both at the exact same height thus the scope is the widest and largest and the most immersive. It made a lot of sense for movie theaters to do that as all they had to do is close curtains from the sides and they were framed for one or the other. It is also a wonderful way to present movies at home. It is simple and efficient. When you buy your screen in the scope AR know that your projector will still be projecting a 16:9 image with black bars above and below your screen area. Depending how high your room is when you zoom out for scope the black bars will be possibly on the ceiling or wall below. You can buy your screen with additional black masking on it if your room works out for that and what your screen will be like is a 16:9 screen with the top and bottom painted black.

If for any reason you watch one of the .001% of the movies out there like Dunkirk some of the movie will go above and below the scope screen but you wont notice it because your vision is fixed around 2.35:1, so it might as well be behind you because you can’t even see it. It is very strange no one ever pointed that out to Christopher Nolan and others as all they are really doing is wasting film. Silly James Cameron fell for this nonsense also and made a movie called Avatar that played in a cropped to scope AR at theater that were not (LieMAX) then the dummy liked the LieMAX version better so he put it on BD that way. If you ever watch that movie just shrink it down to Flat and forget it was supposed to be scope. It will look fine.

Oh ya one other thing you can start practicing on even before you get your projector and screen is not moving your eyes when you watch a movie you need to keep them fixed right at the center of the screen no matter where the action on the screen is. The reason for this is simple your vision is around 2.35:1 if you go looking up at the top of the screen well then some of your vision might go up to the area above the screen that you cant see. We wouldn’t want that because it’s just black up there anyways.

That’s about it welcome to the world of CIH it is really the only way to do this correctly. :eek:
This is just a thought Bud. Buy an A lens and use it for vertical expansion ala IMAX Laser 1.44. At first I didn’t think it was possible, but it is. While it’ll be 1.33AR you would use your full chip. Simply stretch 1.33 to full screen 16x9 then move the lens into the light path. You mentioned you have old classics and that would give you a light and resolution bump. And you could still do HE. It’s a little work but I f I had your setup I’d do it. Course I’d use it for 2.40 as well. You can find a used 380 or 480 cheap.
 

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I have never once said your approach is not perfect for you. All I am merely saying is it may not be perfect for everyone. I’m not trying to confuse the OP rather I’m trying to show him all the options as fairly as I can as that’s what he wanted to hear the pros and the CONS. I actually did try and steer him once when I told him I didn’t recommend CIW as it is nothing more than a giant TV set and doesn’t benefit from the zoom feature his projector will most likely have.

We have no idea about the OP if he likes to sit in the back row of the movie theater or if he has ever seen IMAX level immersion. We only know he is new to front projection and trying to figure it out enough so he can decide what he likes. If he is like 90% of first time FP users within the first year he will wish he had gone more immersive than he did. We have no idea if his room is deep and wide with lower ceilings and he’s trying to fit 16 seats or more into the room or if he has high ceilings and a narrow room with just 2 to 4 seats he can place anywhere he wants from the screen. All these things would factor into the decision making process.

Another important factor we don’t know yet is how bothersome unmasked areas of the screen will be to the OP. In all methods of presentation there will be times the screen will not be full of image. If the OP is deeply bothered by gray/ black bars then he will need some sort of masking method and that is not as easy on a retractable screen.

I am in no way trying to tell the OP what he likes. I’m trying to show him how to find out what he likes, ether by doing it or reading about the process of doing it and maybe that alone would be enough.

To the OP get a roll of blue painters tape and a couple lawn chairs and go out to the garage and put some image sizes up there according to the room you will be using and set the chairs the distance you will be sitting try out all the common options such as CIW,CIH and even CIA and CIH+IMAX1.89. Look at each one and picture some of the movies and shows you will be watching on them and the relative size the image will be.

A great source of information is IMDb for instance if you watch the TV show Stranger Things go to that site and search on the name, then click on more, and select Technical Specs and you will get information on AR here is an example.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt4574334/technical?ref_=tt_ql_dt_6
Now you can think about what size that show will be when it fits into your different screen AR’s.

That's exactly what I did in my garage when I had my HT built. Ended up with a 110" 16x9 screen, 12' away with 5 chairs, 3 front, 2 rear on a 9" riser.
 
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