AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,266 Posts
I watched part of this one last week. I thought the image quality was a bit soft. I was surprised at how this movie had a fairly dark, adult tone and seemed to liberally borrow plot elements from Spielberg's "AI" to the point my young son asked me to turn it off mid-way through the movie because he was "so sad."


T.B.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
I will pick it up tomorrow, I can't get anything before it's officially released.

I was a huge fan of the show when I was a kid.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,469 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just finished watching it wasnt too bad at all. My daughter will watch it this weekend but I do agree with Partyslammer it certainly had some adult tones. My daughter loves Astroboy and I certainly enjoyed it when I was growing up but it will be intresting to see is she likes it or not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,854 Posts
From the trailers this looked like a movie my four year old daughter would love. She digs fun movies where the main character kicks butt - like she does
. However, the reviews I read of the movie all seemed to echo the dark, downer tone. We'll check ou tthe rental some time. I have had Where the Wild Things Are for 2 weeks and yet to watch it with the kids for the same concern.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,700 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Partyslammer /forum/post/18314466


I watched part of this one last week. I thought the image quality was a bit soft. I was surprised at how this movie had a fairly dark, adult tone and seemed to liberally borrow plot elements from Spielberg's "AI" to the point my young son asked me to turn it off mid-way through the movie because he was "so sad."


T.B.

Astroboy was a Manga comic in the 50's, and a series in the 60's and 80's. All versions were quite dark in tone, especially the further back you go.


For what it's worth, AB came about long before AI - and both were preceded by Pinocchio, another very dark story in its original form.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,854 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV /forum/post/18317520


Astroboy was a Manga comic in the 50's, and a series in the 60's and 80's. All versions were quite dark in tone, especially the further back you go.


For what it's worth, AB came about long before AI - and both were preceded by Pinocchio, another very dark story in its original form.

My four year old loves Pinocchio. I, on the other hand, am a little sick of hearing Pinocchio's under the water voice calling out "FATHER. FATHER. FATHER"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
For only 19.99 at walmart I decided to pick it up as a blind buy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,326 Posts
I picked it up at Walmart as well for $16.96 after the $3 redplum coupon (blind buy also). I'll watch it sometime in the next week or two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,839 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,087 Posts
Astro Boy got negative reviews but I just saw a 3D trailer (Panasonic Future Tour) and it got me wanting to see the movie. I have it at home (Netflix) but since my wife wants to see it, I'll have to wait till the weekend. I'll also be watching it with an eye toward purchasing the 3D version whenever it is released if the movie is good enough. Do they have the theme song from the old cartoon show?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
I watched this last night for the first time after making a blind buy at walmart. Excellent film and fantastic picture quality. I new nothing about Astro Boy going in but still enjoyed every second. Definately one of the better animated titles released on blu-ray in my opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,746 Posts
My assessment of Astro Boy, strictly for its video quality from the PQ thread. Smarter in tone than the typical, watered-down family fare Hollywood usually creates.


recommendation: the pinnacle of Tier 0

Astro Boy really sneaked up on my radar for viewing. Purchased on a whim after seeing the last, lone copy left in the store while out shopping, it was never my intention to seek it out on Blu-ray. But some mysterious force pushed me to pick it up as a blind-buy, after seeing the cover. To the employees of Pixar, you are now on notice. Imagi Studios, based in Hong Kong, has finally created the first CGI-animated movie that stands with the best work Pixar has done in the field, and in some regards, surpasses it. In each way that counts, Astro Boy is a reference Blu-ray by any conceivable measure.


Distributed by Summit Entertainment, the new release is a BD-50 where the main feature is encoded in AVC. The average video bitrate is 29.59 Mbps for the 93-minute movie. Outside a few frames of minor banding, the image is completely devoid of compression flaws. It is as transparent to the source animation as the Blu-ray format allows. Notably, the compression parameters and results on Astro Boy are superior to the animated efforts of Disney/Pixar, who tend to bog down their Blu-rays with copious extra features that eat into the bandwidth. A small difference granted, but the top ranking requires careful scrutiny. Transferred directly from the digital files used to create the animation, there is nothing of a technical nature that takes away from the sheer visual impact it possesses.


Anyone that has watched CGI-animation on Blu-ray will be familiar with the general look and style. Colors are very vivid, while maintaining accuracy and avoiding the trap of oversaturation. For the most part it also avoids the artistic choices that many other animated movies are favoring now, like a muted or tinted color palette. I do not want to mislead anyone, the difference in overall quality between Astro Boy and the other top titles of tier zero is a small gap, and not a chasm. Foremost among equals would be an apt description. It simply has no weaknesses, and has some amazing scenes that look better than anything I have seen on Blu-ray. That includes every single disc listed among the top titles.


What partly separated the animation in my mind was the sheer variety and detail in each character model. Pixar and the other studios producing CGI movies have made conscious choices to minimize details on anything but the main characters, giving secondary and tertiary characters less unique modeling. Almost every character in Astro Boy, robot or human, gets extremely detailed modeling that gives them an individualized personality and appearance. Zog the robot, a minor character, shows more visual refinement than most main characters in the other top animated films.


The world of Astro Boy, specifically Metro City, is a very clean-looking setting of a futuristic city in the sky. Certain objects lack highly refined textures, but polished metallic-surfaces should not exhibit many irregularities in the first place. When the movie shifts actions to the surface of the planet at the junkyard, the textures change almost instantaneously to exhibit more detail and grime on the flatter surfaces. The junkyard looks on par with the similar setting found in Wall*E, except without the reduction in picture quality that Pixar added to simulate a film-like appearance.


The final battle is a staggering display of visual brilliance. Incredible in almost way, Astro Boy and his gigantic opponent jump off the screen in fight scenes that rival anything seen on the format. Eye candy has a new reference standard, and it is Astro Boy. There are lots of subtle, little touches to the animation that help set it apart from the pack. The shade of Astro Boy's hair actually changes over the course of the movie, depending on appropriateness to the scene.


I strongly urge fellow viewers here to check out the picture quality for themselves, and report their experience. There are no regrets pushing this for the top placement, as Astro Boy is a shining example of why the tiers exist. The recommendation is for the highest spot in tier zero. It also is an entertaining family film, regardless the merits of its picture quality.


BDInfo scan (courtesy of Cinema Squid):
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...8#post18323358
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,438 Posts
I was pleasantly surprised by this. I've always been aware of Astro Boy but never really followed the character in his various media forms.


The movie was very enjoyable. I thought the graphics were pristine and the AQ/PQ sounded/looked just as good as anything Pixar or Dreamworks has produced. I'm surprised it didn't do much better at the box office given the quality of the story and production. I've heard that fans of Astro Boy were upset at what they felt was a deviation from the character or mythos, but ignorance was bliss as far as my viewing was concerned. I'd recommend it to anyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,700 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantom Stranger /forum/post/18351083


Notably, the compression parameters and results on Astro Boy are superior to the animated efforts of Disney/Pixar, who tend to bog down their Blu-rays with copious extra features that eat into the bandwidth.

I have to take issue with this.


Name one Pixar title on BD where the image quality suffers due to the included extras. I've never seen a Pixar title that didn't blow me away.


Plus, I also take issue with your later statement about skimping on details other than the foreground characters. I see tons of tiny details in the Pixar movies outside of the main characters being focused on, from the Volkswagen "bugs" in Cars to the details in the backgrounds of Ratatouille.


It sounds like you just don't like Pixar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,835 Posts
Just me or was that "garbage can" funny as hell?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,746 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV /forum/post/18351677


Plus, I also take issue with your later statement about skimping on details other than the foreground characters. I see tons of tiny details in the Pixar movies outside of the main characters being focused on, from the Volkswagen "bugs" in Cars to the details in the backgrounds of Ratatouille.


It sounds like you just don't like Pixar.

Quite the contrary, I have been one of Pixar's most vocal supporters in the PQ thread, here on this very forum. They have truly defined state of the art CGI for over a decade now, which is why they are currently ranked in five of the top seven spots in the highest tier for picture quality. You are obviously not familiar with my prior writings on the matter. Until Astro Boy, I had not seen a complete movie at the quality of a Pixar production. That includes pretenders to the throne, like Kung Fu Panda from Dreamworks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,700 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phantom Stranger /forum/post/18352088


Quite the contrary, I have been one of Pixar's most vocal supporters in the PQ thread, here on this very forum. They have truly defined state of the art CGI for over a decade now, which is why they are currently ranked in five of the top seven spots in the highest tier for picture quality. You are obviously not familiar with my prior writings on the matter. Until Astro Boy, I had not seen a complete movie at the quality of a Pixar production. That includes pretenders to the throne, like Kung Fu Panda from Dreamworks.

No, I haven't read your other posts. However, the one I quoted makes it sounds like Pixar has been some sort of chop shop of CG animation over the years. Nothing could be further from the truth.


Here's my take: Astroboy may or may not be better (I haven't really had the chance to study it to take in the details), but it's also made more recently than nearly every other CG animated movie ever made. It's also by a studio without the large amount of output as with Pixar or Dreamworks. It should be more detailed and immersive (the way a hand-made, small output Duesenberg would be finer than an assembly line, high output Ford). The thing is, though, the next Pixar movie will be more detailed and immersive than the last one they made. Up is more detailed than The Incredibles which is more detailed than Monsters Inc and so on. It's the progression of faster processors and cheaper technology and newer tools that allow more to be put in each frame while still getting the movie out to the public in a reasonable amount of time.


I fully agree on Kung Fu Panda (though nearly everyone else disagrees with me). While it was very sharp, the details seemed a bit cheap: lot's of cloned textures and lack of fine details. For example, while the Dreamworks animators seemed content with duplicating the same wood texture on all visible surfaces, the Pixar animators will vary the grain from plank to plank and even along the same piece of wood. They'll also put little splits, cracks and dings in it that normally no one would spot as the movie progresses.


There's a still in the Toy Story/TS2 thread where Buzz has just come through the air vent that illustrates this. In the background, the wall doesn't just have a texture to it. It has evidence of brush strokes around the vent and little imperfections in the surface. The wood baseboard not only has dings and scratches, but the grain has a different character all along its length. There's no cloning of the grain there. Likewise, in Ratatouille, even out of focus objects have real detail and character you really appreciate when you pause the image to study it.


The thing is, Imagi Animation has put out exactly ONE real showcase title. We don't know if this is the type of product they intend to continue to produce. Pixar has proven to not only be a studio intent on quality, but intent on raising the bar with every movie they produce. Plus, you can't deny that the stories in the Pixar movies are equally excellent compared to the animation quality. It's that 1-2 punch that makes them endure, not just one pretty movie.


Until Imagi shows that same commitment on future releases, they haven't put anyone - Pixar or Dreamworks -on notice for anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,079 Posts
I mean, its gotta be better than "9"
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top