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I think the only hope for HTPC decoding of Atmos is if Trinnov licenses their custom decoder to someone like JRiver. Their ultra expensive pre-pros are i7 based custom built computers, so I'd venture to guess the decoder is software based.
If the HTPC doesn't have to do it in real time, ie the stream is decoded before the movie is played, the problem is much simpler.

The "easy" way to do this is to set up an atmos receiver, connect ADCs to every speaker channel, gather a bunch of data and then compare what comes out with what comes in. One should be able to find the pattern.

I suspect that the track has base, channel driven sounds and then a couple(variable number) of object sound tracks where the object track has a moving location within the soundfield.

If one compares the True HD track to the atmos track, one should be able to isolate the moving object tracks.

This would be a very challenging and fun project to work on.
 

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Huh? This forum is a shadow of what it was a few years ago. If anything HTPC popularity is waning, most of the discussion these days seems to be about streaming devices. The Shield thread seems to be one of the most popular here.
Maybe it has waned here, but go visit a Kodi, cordcutters or RPi site and it is flourishing there.

Yesterday I ran into my neighbor at a high tech store, asking the salesman how to put Kodi on an RPi ! What the heck ? She isn't at all technical. If that isn't HTPC getting closer to mainstream, I don't know what is.
 

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There are probably more people using Kodi than ever before, but they're doing it on the smallest, lowest price boxes they can get away with. Pi, WeTek, Shield, Chromebox, Fire TV, Minix, etc.
 

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I think the only hope for HTPC decoding of Atmos is if Trinnov licenses their custom decoder to someone like JRiver. Their ultra expensive pre-pros are i7 based custom built computers, so I'd venture to guess the decoder is software based.
I agree, but I am confident they won't so I purchased the Trinnov. Will keep following this thread though. Also, it is 100% software based. DTS X is just an Internet update.
 

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There are probably more people using Kodi than ever before, but they're doing it on the smallest, lowest price boxes they can get away with. Pi, WeTek, Shield, Chromebox, Fire TV, Minix, etc.
So what ? It is still a form of HTPC. Why build a big, expensive, noisy machine when you can do it with a small, silent, inexpensive one ?
 

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So what ? It is still a form of HTPC. Why build a big, expensive, noisy machine when you can do it with a small, silent, inexpensive one ?
But you're not likely to find hobbyests or companies to build sound cards, drivers, and write software for that kind of ultra low cost market. It would have to come from the integrator community, and they have off the shelf pre-pros available to them.
 

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I think the only hope for HTPC decoding of Atmos is if Trinnov licenses their custom decoder to someone like JRiver. Their ultra expensive pre-pros are i7 based custom built computers, so I'd venture to guess the decoder is software based.
Agreed. Of course it would come with a Trinnov priced license fee too. $$$$ LOL
 

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So what ? It is still a form of HTPC. Why build a big, expensive, noisy machine when you can do it with a small, silent, inexpensive one ?
Would you call a Trinnov Altitude32 a PC? What about an Xbox (original), or the first Toshiba HD DVD player? All of these devices use PC hardware, but would you call them an HTPC? I wouldn't. Now I've always said that what puts the "HT" in an HTPC is the integration, the tailoring of that PC hardware to the specific function of operating in an HT. Careful integration of a remote so it fits "seamlessly" with the other components, easy to use interface, etc. That said there still needs to be a bit of "PC" in it. I run a Chromebox with OpenELEC in my HT. It's standard PC hardware, but all it can do is run OpenELEC (Kodi) it's got more in common with a media streamer than a PC. You can't mess with decoders, you can't add audio or video processing to it, you're completely at the mercy of the Kodi/OpenELEC developers for support, just like if you buy a WDTV or Roku.

I guess my point is the same as pitsoccer, even if Kodi is growing, the fact that it's growing in the area of Android apps, and embedded/SFF devices means that it's not going to do any good to drive support for "HTPC" developments like Atmos, or room correction, or anything of the sort. Likewise it won't drive support for UHD Blu-ray since the licensing issues make that a non-starter for FOS software.

The reality of the situation is these new cheap hardware platforms are doing more to improve the "media streamer" market than they are helping the "HTPC" market.
 

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It's not that I don't want to see that happen - I'd love it. I'd love to see Google, Microsoft, Apple, Nvidia, AMD, Asus, Intel, etc pouring resources into HTPC applications and hardware.

I'm just being pragmatic and realistic. DTS-MA showed up when, 2005? 2006? And just this past spring we got a PC decoder for that.

We are down to what, one lone bluray player for the pc? And no word on UHD bluray being supported on the pc? Atmos is in the realm of optical discs and streaming boxes, something the PC is increasingly getting worse at.
 

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When you use makemkv, any old bluray drive works. It doesn't have to be a "bluray player" drive. They are used for data backup, so no chance that will end anytime soon.

FYI, all the 4K Bluray disk sizes mentioned so far match the BD XL spec. With any luck makemkv will convert them just like it does for regular BDs right now.
 

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4K displays are going to kill the small form factor HTPCs. (Rpi, etc.) To play 4K at 60Hz, you need an HDMI 2.0+ port and none of these devices (and very few full form factor PCs) have an HDMI 2.0 port.

The way around this restriction is to stream 4K material into the TV with upd, rtp or upnp/DLNA. To do that you need to rip it with makemkv.
 

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When you use makemkv, any old bluray drive works. It doesn't have to be a "bluray player" drive.
It doesn't have anything to do with MakeMKV, there's no such thing as a "Blu-ray player drive". Any Blu-ray disc drive can read any Blu-ray Disc.

FYI, all the 4K Bluray disk sizes mentioned so far match the BD XL spec. With any luck makemkv will convert them just like it does for regular BDs right now.
And yet the PS4 has been confirmed to not support the discs used by Ultra HD Blu-ray. It could be that the PS4 doesn't have a BD-XL compatible drive, or it could be that the pressed Ultra HD Blu-ray discs are enough different from the burnable BD-XL discs that they won't work in normal BD-XL drives. We likely won't know until pressed Ultra HD Blu-ray discs make it to hands of normal people with BD-XL drives to try.

4K displays are going to kill the small form factor HTPCs. (Rpi, etc.) To play 4K at 60Hz, you need an HDMI 2.0+ port and none of these devices (and very few full form factor PCs) have an HDMI 2.0 port.

The way around this restriction is to stream 4K material into the TV with upd, rtp or upnp/DLNA. To do that you need to rip it with makemkv.
UPnP/etc streaming produces it's own issues like not supporting lossless audio.
 

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......You can't really use multiple sound cards to generate the channels because there is no way to synchronize the timing of the channels between multiple sound cards. You can get it close, but it won't be perfect. You can test this by connecting multiple USB sound "cards" to a computer and sending them the same stream. It should sound perfectly together, but generally there is soon an echo as one gets out of sync with the other. Maybe I was doing it wrong ?

If you can get the DACs to stay synced then it is "just" a matter of separating the True HD bitstream into the individual channel bitstreams. If someone figures out how to do that, I'll handle outputting them to analog
This issue is easily solved by using professional sound cards. Remember that pro Tools and it's competitors all have this same requirement. I use the Lynx AES16 which has facilities built in to sync multiple cards.

But try this with a stack of commodity USB DACs, then yes, you will end up with sync problems.
 

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Awesome prognostication that eventually, the surround software will accommodate any speaker positions. Automatically!

They could also take into account the room acoustics (shape and surface transmission.)

However, will the market pay for such technology? It might all get worked out by the Gaming community trying to perfect battle realism(!)
 

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The problem is you can just go buy an AVR or SSP that supports all this (and run HDMI from the PC to it), and that's what 99.99% of people will do since they need amplification and the AVR anyway.
 

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The problem is you can just go buy an AVR or SSP that supports all this (and run HDMI from the PC to it), and that's what 99.99% of people will do since they need amplification and the AVR anyway.
That's correct.....well I certainly agree with you at least:)


I'm one of those 0.01%'ers. I've got a whole heap of pro amps and an HTPC chassis that I'd like to put to use with Atmos. But frankly, the whole thing seems like a bridge too far at the moment.


An AVR is just a much easier way to go with this right now.
 

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4K displays are going to kill the small form factor HTPCs. (Rpi, etc.) To play 4K at 60Hz, you need an HDMI 2.0+ port and none of these devices (and very few full form factor PCs) have an HDMI 2.0 port.

The way around this restriction is to stream 4K material into the TV with upd, rtp or upnp/DLNA. To do that you need to rip it with makemkv.
It may destroy small form factor - but for my machine....insert Nvidia GTX950 hdmi 2.0 and HDCP 2.2 compliant. :cool:
 

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If I understand correctly, nothing special should be required to pass (bitstream) Atmos, any current Blu-ray player should be able to do it.
You are correct... It passes both Atmos and DT-X just fine to my Denon 7200 AVR. The Denon Displays what it is decoding and it sounds great.
 

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I am admittedly joining this thread late in the game but wanted to give my 2 cents. I am using a Dell Inspiron Small as an HTPC in one room and an Intel NUC in another, both of which are running Plex Home Theater Edition on them and I am able to pass Dolby Atmos and DTS:X from them to my Denon AVR. I just had to make sure that the settings in the Plex Software were set to "Direct Play" (which for some reason they weren't) for local playback.

I didn't have to do any tweaking of the PCs settings whatsoever. I love the fact that the NUC is so small and comes with the VESA Mount, i just attached it to the back of my TV Mount and I have an IR Remote that I use to "Wake" it up.
 
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