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Is there anything I can do to set me Rane EQs?


I haven't found anyone to calibrate them and do not want to invest in a spectrum analyzer set up.


However, I'd like to get my EQs dialed in somewhat 'til I figure out what to do.


Thanks
 

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If you have a quality variable frequency sine wave or function generator and a sound level meter, you can sweep the frequency range and determine where the volume peaks/dips and tweek accordingly.:cool:
 

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For the marginal increase in cost, you might consider the EFT5 software. I have it sitting on my floor, but have not used it yet. I just got my system up and running, and, frankly, it sounds so good already I have not been that motivated to take a half day to set up my computer and run all the tests. Word-of-mouth is very good on the software. Others on this forum and on Audiogon say they have gotten spectacular results. It runs on your PC, and costs $299 Canadian (about $260.00 US at current exchange rates). It generates the test tones (pink noise, white noise, sweep tones), and not only includes a spectrum analyzer (which is instantaneous information) but also provides time information in the form of "waterfall plots" (showing the time it takes for each frequency to decay,which really tells you where reverberance is coming from. This is useful for room treatment placement and EQ settings). It also provides a bunch of other information I am even not sure what to do with. To run the program you will need a calibrated microphone and a cable, which you can get at Guitar Center or other musician-type stores for maybe another $150.00. If you know any musicians with home studios, you might even be able to borrow the mic and cable. This seems to be the cheapest and most scientific approach. I figure it will take me a half day to run all the tests to determine speaker placement, crossover points, and settings for my Meyer Sound parametric EQ. I will give a full report on the results when they are done, but it may take a few weeks before I gear up for the project. I am too busy listening to music and watching movies to spend alot of time tweaking right now.
 

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A few corrections about ETF:


The software uses MLS (Maximum Length Sequence) test signals that are generated by the software (no test CD needed), captured by the microphone, sent to the PC, and then run through FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) analysis to generate the many graphs. This provides lots more detailed info than simple RTA analysis.


1) I have been using ETF for the last 4 years and it's still only $149 US (NOT $260).

website is ETF


By the way, you can download and use the demo for free with an RS SPL meter (some features are disabled such as save and print).


Yes, I think this is a great product, and I even list it in my "Current System" link below.


2) You can use the RCA output on the RS SPL meter as the input device (combo mic/preamp) to the LINE-IN on your PC soundcard instead of a calibrated mic/preamp combo.


i.e. you don't absolutely need a calibrated mic/preamp combination, but can upgrade to one later on if you want.
 

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Try a FREE program called SpectroGram. Versions up to version 5 are freeware, so they have no nags or time limits or restrictions on use, and are completely free. Currently at version 7, which is shareware with a time limit of a couple minutes until you regi$ter.


Search for "gram50.zip" or "Spectrogram 5.1.6" on google. You should be able to find a place to download it.


Spectrogram will display a realtime spectrum analyser type display (bars or line) or a scrolling spectrogram. It is capable of very fine frequency resolution... literally hundreds of bands in the audible spectrum, rather than just 1/3 octave (though it can do that too).


As Bruce suggested, you can use the Line input of a Radio shack SPL meter as a calibrated source. Probably not as accurate as a dedicated professional calibrated measurement microphone, but quite good. Don't forget to apply the corrections mentioned elsewhere to flatten it out (these can be input into spectrogram so that it accounts for the corrections in the display).
 
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