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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone thought of using an AV-rack like this one - http://www.stereosource.com/pos.cfm?idnum=82 (this is just an example.. you can probably find similar racks far cheaper) as basis for a hushbox?


I have a similar rack just standing around the house not used for anything and thought it could easily be modified for the LT150 that's on the way to me. The backing is very thin and I can easily cut a hole in it to mount a (or even several) 220V quiet high output fan. Put the receiver, HTPC and DVD player in there too for that matter - just add more fans if heat is a problem. Line the walls of it with sound absorbing foam and it should work quite well I'd think. Project the image through the glass and it would be well protected from anyone poking at the projector or otherwise stumbling around in a dark room. It'll also look good for those worried about interior design issues. And for those like me with relatively low carpentry skills it's much easier than making a custom box from scratch. It's also on wheels - manual zoom http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif . Shelves are moveable so height adjustment should be easy.


Only possible issue is if the glass is smoked glass as that would work as a filter (hey.. better black level http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/tongue.gif j/k). I can probably get some clear glass if that really is an issue however.


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/frode
 

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I currently use a Plateau MXA ( www.jandr.com ) rack as a partial husbox for my Sanyo PLV-60, 70" stand, and a rack. This rack is open on the sides, however, it is very easy to cut black shelving and rest it in the front and two sides. I leave the back open because the projector sticks out about 1/2 inch and I didn't want to add any extra fans. I cut a 4x4 square hole in the front for a piece of edmunds optical glass.


Combine it with automobile sound-absorbing foam on the inside and an acoustic panel on the rear wall and it is fairly quiet and stays cool. Placing the projector high on a tall rack makes cable management a cinch since all of your equipment is right there below it.


I guess you could use a glass-front rack, however, there might be some distortion going through the glass and you wouldn't be able to change it at all.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Frode:
Only possible issue is if the glass is smoked glass as that would work as a filter (hey.. better black level http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/tongue.gif j/k). I can probably get some clear glass if that really is an issue however.
The other thing you typically want is non-reflective glass so the image doesn't get bounced back to the projector.


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Tom L.

my-soontobe-home-theater
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If I remember my refractive theory right (never thought I'd ever use this in practice) then placing the projector as close as possible to the glass should minimize both distortion and any reflection problems provided the refractive index of the glass isn't too bad. I could also use some anti-reflection spray I suppose. Replacing the glass door is really simple at least as it's fastened with clamps.


Thanks andrechen for pointing out the issue of connections. I'll be using both a HTPC and a progressive DVD player and since the LT150 only has one shared VGA/component input I'll need to come up with some kind of simple switchbox I can use. Alternately I can take off the back and put it on hinges so I get a door in the back as well.


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/frode
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Frode:
If I remember my refractive theory right (never thought I'd ever use this in practice) then placing the projector as close as possible to the glass should minimize both distortion and any reflection problems provided the refractive index of the glass isn't too bad. I could also use some anti-reflection spray I suppose. Replacing the glass door is really simple at least as it's fastened with clamps.

I'm not sure about the close thing. If I remember correct, to minimize distortion from refraction, the ray needs to be perpendicular to the surface. Since the lens is divergent, the closer the worse off you are. Anti-reflective glass is expensive, just look at the Edmunds cat.

Warning: I am not a optics guy, and am reaching into the recesses of old undergraduate stuff.


SM
 
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