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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to Amazon to pick up an AVIA and/or DVE DVD. Found out there were several versions available.


Have 50" ...7UY on order, and will have a fairly high end HT audio system.


- What are the latest versions of each.


- Where are good places to pick up these items.


- About how much should I be paying for each of these.


- And of course, any opinions on which would be best for me are always welcome.
 

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DVE for DVD has two versions: NTSC and PAL. For the USA NTSC would be used. The only other version of Avia I'm aware of is Avia Pro which costs about 9-10 time the amount of Avia. There is the Sound & Vision DVD which is a scaled down Avia with some patterns of Avia Pro.


Fry's may have a copy of the NTSC DVE.

Best Buy may have the Sound & Vision.

Suncoast Video in the malls may have Avia.

That's where I purchased my copies in Austin.


DVE is about $25 MSRP and Avia is about $50 MSRP.


There is no clear consensus as to which DVD is "best": Some like Avia because it has more patterns and it is easier to navigate for some people. Other like DVE because it is more recent, has many 16:9 patterns, and has some nice demonstration material. Some like Sound & Vision because it costs less than the other two and may be the easist to use of the three.


Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Paul -- I thought I would need something other than the NTSC version because I have a HD set on order, which was one reason I was confused by the versions. But now that I think of it, the Panny ...7UY doesn't have any tuners in it -- will that make any difference.
 

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Either Avia or DVE will work fine with an HDTV or EDTV. Personally I use Avia. Keep in mind that ANY DVD only has 480i content on it, so there is no such thing (yet) as an HD-DVD. But the settings you need to make are essentially independent of the scalling that will go on either in your DVD player or in your display to match the display's HD resolution -- which is the same reason you can watch normal DVD movies on your display.


You will find that most test screens on these DVD's are setup up for convential TV's 4:3 aspect ratio, but will work just fine if your TV is set to, for example, stretch them to fill the screen. You will also find test screens that are specifically set up for evaluating the geometry and zoom settings of a 16:9 TV. Again, don't sweat it. Either of these calibration DVDs will work fine for you.

--Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I am still a little confused over the DVE products. They have a couple of VHS versions available (Digital Video Essentials - High Definition D-VHS 1080i & a 720p version). What are these higher priced for products for. Do you really need one of these to calibrate a 50" HD ...7UY.
 

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Ron,

Those are not DVDs. They are tapes for digital video tape recorders/players that handle high definition content. Unless you have such a tape player you don't want or need one of the D-VHS tapes.

--Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK, Bob, Thanks. Yes, I realized that they were tapes. I really couldn't figure out why they were so much more expensive -- I guess I didn't realize that VHS players had these HD outputs. I still don't know why they don't produce these on DVD, or is it due to the lack of DVDs that are capable of HD output.
 

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It's not just any old VHS tape player that can use these digital tapes. It's a very different, and rather expensive DIGITAL-VHS player -- typically bought by folks who want to record HDTV without loss of resolution.


As for DVDs, right. There's no such thing as a DVD with HD resolution video on it yet. All the DVD players that put out 720p or 1080i are taking 480i data off the DVD and scaling it up to that resolution, more or less cleverly depending upon the player.


Alternatively, if you have the player send the original 480i data to your display, then it is your DISPLAY which scales it up to match it's resolution -- what the old TV marketing campaigns used to call "line doublers". Either way the original data is just 480i and no better.


Despite that, studios have still found a way to make better and worse DVDs. Some studios try to cram so much onto a single disc that they have to over-compress the data to make it all fit -- which causes some corruption to the video images. So there are folks out there marketing super high quality DVDs, for a hefty price premium of course, where all they've really done is turn down the compression -- using 2 DVDs instead of 1 to hold the same movie for example.


If you go over to the DVD player forum, you'll find many people straining at the leash to be the first to buy the new HD DVD players that are supposed to come out sometime next year -- which of course will only work better than the current players when and if the studios get a significant number of HD DVD discs into the stores to play on them.


Also there are two competing formats for what will become "HD DVD" and it's not yet clear which will win.

--Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Bob, I think I am finally catching on.
 

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Ron, I have all three of the above mentioned calibration disks: S&V, AVIA and DVE. I do not use S&V that much any more, but whenever I calibrate the picture I tend to use both AVIA and DVE. It just happens that some of my favorite patterns are available on one disk and other patterns on another. Both disks have lengthy and somewhat boring introductions to the world of Home Theater. Both have weird navigation menus, but their values outweigh their shortcomings by far.

Bob and Paul as usual gave very accurate and detailed info in their posts. I would only like to point out to you, Ron, that no matter which DVD calibration disk you use, you will not be calibrating your display or your DVD player only. You will be calibrating picture settings for the DVD playback only for a given combination of the following:

- video output on DVD player used (let's say DVI or component, etc);

- video input on your TV used (let's say DVI or component, etc),

- that particular DVD player;

- that particular display;

- (and arguably) that particular video interconnect (DVI cable, set of component cables, etc).

If any of the above is changed (e.g. you swap your DVD player, use a different brand component cables or instead of DVI connect your player via component, and so on) you ideally have to re-calibrate because all of the above will affect the picture quality to a certain extent.

Also, there are displays with global picture settings, and there are those that have independent settings per video input. In case your display has a global memory for video settings then the values that you will set for the DVD playback will affect the picture settings for cable and other sources but more than likely will not be optimal for them since there will be a substantial difference in the video signal itself. In case your display has independent memory settings, then your DVD playback calibration will have no effect whatsoever on your HD/SD cable or other sources.
 

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Hello Ron,


I looked today. Fry's has both the DVE and Avia DVD.


The D-VHS versions of DVE and not typcially found in local stores, they are an even more specialized version than D-VHS, they're D-Theater which means that JVC and Marantz D-VHS/D-Theater machines can play them. Mitsubishi will not.


Calibrating the HD inputs might take an early Tuesday morning (7AM) visit with HDNet when they broadcast test patterns for about ten minutes -- if you have TWC or other means of receiving HDNet.


Paul
 
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