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One thing I've always wondered about... how do you know when your sound is "right"? In Video Essentials, they say setting video settings until it "looks good" is not the way to go, because you don't know what image quality is *right*. They (and AVIA) proceed to offer a means of comparison, so your settings are objective. But how do you do this with sound? If you have an equalizer, you can push the sliders all over the place until they sound "good" to you, and someone else will say it's all wrong. Is there a way to set your sound so it's the way the producer intended you to hear it, like you set video?
 

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It's been a while since I used to work in audio. But as I recall, we used a spectrum analyzer ( I think that's what it was called) Looks like an equalizer but instead of sliders it has lights. You would put a mic in the listening area and hook it up to this device and use a pink noise or white generator. Then you adjust your eq for flat sound at different frequencies. With Avia or VE (or your reciever) you use an SPL meter to set the overall levels between the speakers. I think that's how it was but I could be completely wrong.

John

San Jose, Ca.


Wife: " Are you sure about that, or are you just making it up as you go along?"
 

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Avias audio test signals are far more extensive than those on VE. My favorite signals are those for integrating a subwoofer into your system (extensive signals that test the accuracy of your bass management if you have a SPL meter and a pad)

1/6 Octave RTA (Goldline) or a eftacoustics software with a PC and a high quality mic is the way to objectify what you hear in your room at one spot.

You have a number of choices to optimize sound (without changing your exisiting equipment) including speaker and sub placement, room treatments and modelling, proper placement of the prime sitting position, EQ etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Big_John
I think that's how it was but I could be completely wrong.

John

San Jose, Ca.
You are absolutely correct. Spectrum Analyzers are also known as Real Time Analyzers. You play pink noise through your system and the RTA has a calibrated microphone. You then adjust your EQ accordingly. However, if you are using an EQ and it is in the analog domain, you will be introducing all sorts of phase anomolies that are usually more harmful than the EQ is helpful. A quality RTA runs several thousand dollars. You are better off with room treatments and speaker placement to achieve a flat frequency response than an EQ (assuming the speakers themselves can produce a flat response).


I just got the Avia disc the other day and it was an excellent tool. I don't have matching amplifiers between my main channels (would be mighty pricey using Jadis for 5 channels of HT) and it turned out that my main front channel amplifier was out of phase from my HT amplifiers. The test disc pointed this out immediately and otherwise I would never have noticed. I also love the warble tone frequency sweep to find all of the annoying rattles in my room,
 
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