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I have a 5 channel amp i want to use to biamp a set of stereo B&W 603 speakers. The model is Adcom GFA-6000, which has 100x3 up front and 60x2 for the rear. My dilema is that I need to decide whether I want to use the 100 for low or high inputs on the speaker (the other 2 would of course be 60 watts). Any suggestions?
 

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to the best of my knowledge the 600 series can only be biwired, NOT biamped.

do check the manual...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by F355
to the best of my knowledge the 600 series can only be biwired, NOT biamped.

do check the manual...
? Strange. If it has the right terminals for biwiring, what's to prevent biamping?


Kal
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson
? Strange. If it has the right terminals for biwiring, what's to prevent biamping?


Kal



A mental block!!! :)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by J_Palmer_Cass
A mental block!!! :)
Yeah. Those are harder to remove than jumpers.


Kal
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by baller99
I have a 5 channel amp i want to use to biamp a set of stereo B&W 603 speakers. The model is Adcom GFA-6000, which has 100x3 up front and 60x2 for the rear. My dilema is that I need to decide whether I want to use the 100 for low or high inputs on the speaker (the other 2 would of course be 60 watts). Any suggestions?
IMHO, I would use the 100w for the LF section for your speakers. There is some confusion with bi-amping, as some hi-end listeners would like to use an active crossover, rather than the built in passive crossovers in the speakers. This would not be an easy task with your 603s, (or any other speaker for that matter), as you would need to bypass the crossover board's components. Otherwise, as Kal has said, you are fine, also here is a link to B&W's thoughts on bi-amping:

http://www.bwspeakers.com/index.cfm/...7F00D0B7473B37


:)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson
? Strange. If it has the right terminals for biwiring, what's to prevent biamping?
Biamping is ONLY useful if your crossovers are active unless you're only doing it for a bit more power handling. Peter pretty much hit it right on.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonoMan
Biamping is ONLY useful if your crossovers are active unless you're only doing it for a bit more power handling. Peter pretty much hit it right on.
Who said anything about useful or effective?? Biamping is the use of two amps to drive separate drivers, regardless of where the crossover, if any lies. Using active crossovers AND eliminating the built-in passive ones can have great value, if done well.


Kal
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson
Who said anything about useful or effective?
I believe I did ;)


Yes, you can biamp as long as the crossovers are separate (and they should be for anything with dual input terminals), be they active or passive. If the manual says it can be biwired but not biamped, then that makes me think the crossover may not be separate, in which case you could separate it yourself if you can use a soldering iron and a razor.


Edit: there is an advantage to biamping even with passive crossovers - you don't need to pad down the drivers to match the sensitivity, because you can just set the volumes on the amps to account for it. It'll be more efficient. Though active crossovers are still better :p
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonoMan
I believe I did ;)
i know but I was ignoring you. ;)

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonoMan
Yes, you can biamp as long as the crossovers are separate (and they should be for anything with dual input terminals), be they active or passive. If the manual says it can be biwired but not biamped, then that makes me think the crossover may not be separate, in which case you could separate it yourself if you can use a soldering iron and a razor.
It may be so especially if the speaker maker is concerned about anyone using two separate amps with, perhaps, different ground levels. However, I'd wonder if the average Joe (not you, of course) would know how to separate the crossover legs if the manufacturer decided it would not. :D

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonoMan
Edit: there is an advantage to biamping even with passive crossovers - you don't need to pad down the drivers to match the sensitivity, because you can just set the volumes on the amps to account for it. It'll be more efficient. Though active crossovers are still better :p
Agreed but, afaik, the B&W 603s don't have such controls. Do any B&Ws?


Kal
 
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