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Just conducting another inquiry on seeing how many people are backing up their "Price-Less" DVD titles that are viewed quite frequently.. How are you backing them up? Are you doing full back-ups with menus and all; or are you cutting out all the extras and just leaving the main show on the copy?


Im trying to figure out the best route to backup my most frequently viewed DVD's to preserve the originals from damage during regular use.


I have done a few backups by ripping first with DVD-Decrypter and then using DVDToolBox to sort out the extras leaving me with the main feature, but in some cases the main feature is too big to fit on a single DVD-R (4.7GB) disk so I use DVDShrink to compress it a bit.


Are there any better methods to making high quality backups of our owned DVD's?



I appreciate any help in preserving my ever growing collection :)


And yes I do treat my DVD's with gingerly, but there is always that one time when the movie you love most manages to somehow slip out of your fingers and roll across the room and with perfect timing the dog comes running along to play with it :-( ....



Thanks!


Wu-
 

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i take out all the menus and extras. i leave just the highest quality audio stream and english subtitle if it's a foreign film. if it doesn't fit on 1 dvd i split it onto 2.
 

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For me it's:

DVD-Decrypter in ISO mode + Daemon Tools + Lots o' Hard Drive Space :D


I'd go the DVD+/-RW route, but I really don't want to have to go through the hassle of doing splitting or re-encoding/re-authoring so I can cram my DVD-9 discs onto 4.7GB media.
 

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Same here, for the movies that get a lot of viewing I rip them to my media server - menus and all. I can store approx 30 movies on my main server at any one time (varies depending on the movies). I have shortcuts to mount / unmount the images with daemon tools.


- Rick
 

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Ditto on what Deathwind posted for me!


Mike


Quote:
Originally posted by Deathwind
For me it's:

DVD-Decrypter in ISO mode + Daemon Tools + Lots o' Hard Drive Space :D


I'd go the DVD+/-RW route, but I really don't want to have to go through the hassle of doing splitting or re-encoding/re-authoring so I can cram my DVD-9 discs onto 4.7GB media.
 

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dvdxcopy is definatly worth the $80-100 bucks. it is a one step backup that copies what ever you select, extras or no extras. dual layer dvd's will need two discs of course.

The beauty is in the easy of use. put a blank in dvd recorder, put dvd original in dvd rom drive. launch program, select what you want to record, push button to start and thats it. In half hour to an hour, depending if it is one or two disks, you have your backup.


the only drawbacks are some dvd's like sopronos and band of brothers are a problem to record multiple episodes on one dvd. You have to put each episode on its own dvd.


Now if only I could have a one step to backup my movies from my Ultimate tv box I would be a happy man.
 

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Lets hope 321 wins to make it legal to backup our DVD's for playback from our HD's


Hollywood Faces Key Court Battle Over DVD Copying



Apr 22, 11:47 am ET


By Bob Tourtellotte

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Hollywood's movie studios face a key test in their battle to defend copyright holders from digital pirates, when a federal court in California this Friday hears a case filed by a maker of software that allows users to copy DVDs.


At stake for the studios are potentially billions of dollars in revenues that would be lost if nearly perfect digital copies of movies on DVD were sold in large quantities on the black market or circulated on the Internet in digital files.


But the privately held software maker, St. Louis-based 321 Studios, argues that its software is designed to protect DVD owners by allowing them to make backup copies in case their DVDs, which can cost as much as $30, get damaged or are lost.


The case, which will be heard in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, tests the limits of 1998's controversial Digital Millennium Copyright Act, lawyers said.


The studios claim 321's software violates a portion of the act that makes it illegal for anyone to sell software used to break or bypass digital encryption codes.



But 321 argues that the DMCA allows software owners to get around encryption when copies are made for an owner's sole use.


"This is a very interesting, cutting-edge case," said 321's San Francisco-based attorney Daralyn Durie. "The first issue is what does the DMCA mean, and does it prohibit all circumvention of encryption, or does it only prohibit the circumvention when it's being done to engage in copyright infringement."


Durie contends that copying DVDs, for example, to use excerpts in critical reviews or by a teacher in a presentation to students, falls under the legal concept of protected "fair use." 321's software, called DVD Copy Plus and DVD X Copy, aids in the "fair use" of copyrighted content, she said.


Not so, say the studios. "321 isn't making any fair use. They are stripping my copy protection," said Russell Frackman, the attorney for the Motion Picture Association of America, which represents Hollywood's major film studios.


"The law has never provided you have the right to get two-for-one" when you buy a DVD, Frackman said.


BILLION DOLLAR BABIES


The MPAA estimates that filmmakers already lose $3 billion a year in old-style, analog piracy, which is copying videotapes or taping movies in theaters or movie production offices with small video cameras and then reselling them on the black market.


While the MPAA has battled analog piracy for years, the practice has proved nearly impossible to stop. The industry has taken some solace in the fact that tape quality generally is bad and the distribution of tapes can be tracked.


The equation changes in the digital world, however, where copies are exact and can be put on the Internet for downloading to computers around the world.


Illegal copying and Web-based free swapping of digital music has wreaked havoc on the record industry. Global music sales in 2002 fell 7.2 percent from 2001 to $32.2 billion.


The MPAA is determined to avoid the same fate. To some extent, the free swapping of digital movies has been limited by the hours it takes to download a film with dial-up connections.


High-speed broadband links, however, reduce that time to minutes. California-based Adams Media Research expects broadband-linked homes to number 24.3 million by the end of 2003, up 41 percent from 17.2 million at the end of 2002.


The MPAA estimates as many as 400,000 to 600,000 digital movies are currently being downloaded everyday from file swap sites like KaZaa, Gnutella and Morpheus.


"The (quality) of it gives me a Maalox moment," MPAA Chief Jack Valenti said at the ShoWest industry gathering in March.


Defendants are various film studio divisions of Sony Corp., AOL Time Warner Inc., Walt Disney Co., Vivendi Universal, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc., Pixar Animation Studios Inc. and Saul Zaentz Co.
 

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I just buy the dvd again if its somehow destroyed.. Saves me a lot of hassle and hours configuring, burning and editing in front of the computer. In addition to the costs of a dvd burner, blanks and software. It doesn't happen that often anyway.
 

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"i'm curious. could you put a % on the number of dvds that DON'T fit on 4.7GB media?"


Nowadays, almost all movies released will be on DVD-9 media. The reason why DVD-5s (4.7GB) were more common initially was due to cost. Before it was almost twice as much to stamp out a DVD-9 which holds about twice as much info as a DVD-5. But now that the price point has fallen, its pretty much just as cheap to crank out the DVD-9s, especially if you replicate large volumes like the hollywood movies. Just as a reference, you can put your standard 1 hour 40 min movie onto a DVD-5 with no problem at all. But then that means very little extras. To encode all those nice trailers, deleted scenes, etc...you need a DVD-9. Or you do a bad encoding job (lower bit rate) if the studio is cheap and cram it on a DVD-5. The price began to fall dramatically a couple years ago. So, the DVDs made before say 1999, had a much higher percentage of them being DVD-5s. So when DonBerg posted "99.9%" are DVD-9s, that really refers to hollywood movies stamped out today.
 

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that is true mad_arab, burner cost me $350, dvdxcopy $100, 4x dvd media $2 each. If I back up 50 movies altogether with this setup it will cost me $13 to back up a dual layer dvd. I probably will back up much less than that, so that actual cost per is much higher.


as far as configuring dvdxcopy, it worked out of the box for me.
 

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Most people who buy DVD burners and software aren't using them just to back up their DVD collection. Most of them also make data backups, and author home movies or TV programming (esp. if not available on DVD) and burn them to DVD's. You can't assign all the cost of equipment and software to DVD backups.


I started out with DVDXCopy and like it very much. I still use it if I want a same-quality backup of my DVD. Many times, though, I use DVD2One or DVDShrink to backup just the main movie. DVD2One does a great job on DVD's that contain TV episodes, by the way. Just use the "Full Disk" option.
 

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What I do is use dvd decrypter to rip an iso to my HD. Then I look at the size of the files on the disc and figure out how much space is being occupied by the 16X9 or the 4X3 version. Then I use dvd2one to "isolate" the version that I want, keeping the output size the same as the actual size of the files so that it doesn't perform any compression, and I keep this version on my HD or burn it.
 

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i make duplicates of my dvd's so i have 1 copy at home and 1 at school. eventually i'll probably keep one set in my car and the other at home. it does take a lot of time but i've already made up for the cost. i bought my dvd+rw for $180 and $2 per blank.


if i remove all the unnecessaries i'd say that 60% of my dvd's fit on 1 dvd-5.


i use dvd decrypter and ifoedit (both freeware). i backed up all 3 seasons of sopranos by putting 2 episodes on each disc. it ends up as 7 dvd's per season.
 

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Mary H,


How easy is it to isolate the 16x9 version of the film using DVDXCopy? Also, does anyone have an estimate on the gig size of an average 2 hr. 16x9 pic (without menus or subtitles)


I'm really curious about all this because the ability to store almost 30 full quality flicks per 100 gigs is the reason I'm upgrading from my laptop to an HTPC.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Roger1
Mary H,


How easy is it to isolate the 16x9 version of the film using DVDXCopy? Also, does anyone have an estimate on the gig size of an average 2 hr. 16x9 pic (without menus or subtitles)


I'm really curious about all this because the ability to store almost 30 full quality flicks per 100 gigs is the reason I'm upgrading from my laptop to an HTPC.
In its current version (1.5.2) DVDXCopy doesn't lend itself to picking and choosing various versions of the movie or extra features. It's strong point is the ability to make a backup with exactly the same quality as the original. DVD2One or DVDShrink are better when you want to select specific title sets, audio tracks, and subtitle tracks, and/or apply compression to force a movie to fit on one disc. I use all 3 at various times, depending on the task at hand.


However, DVDXCopy will be coming out with their "Express" and "Platinum" versions very soon, which are reported to be offering those features, and others.
 
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