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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did a search, but did not find what I was specifically looking for.


This pertains to my new Samsung LN52B630, but I'm sure its pretty much the same for all LCD TV's.


First when it comes to saving energy, is the backlight setting the most important or even the only setting that makes a difference? Or/and, does the brightness setting also contribute to energy use.


Also, will keeping the backlight set to a low setting improve the lifespan of your TV? And will the brightness setting, and maybe even the contrast setting also effect the lifespan?


I would appreciate any thoughts or comments on this.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom713 /forum/post/17029938


I did a search, but did not find what I was specifically looking for.

'Coz we here don't worry about such things. It's like putting on a cover on the leather sofa 'coz ur afraid to soil it.


Suffice to say, if your TV lasts u 5 years, yer immensely lucky. And if u spent usd1K+, shop for an extended warranty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I appreciate the replies, but I was looking for a real answerer. Granted, maybe both things are small, but with me recently loosing my job, these things are important to me....
 

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If you have suffered a job loss and don't expect your income to return to normal anytime soon sell the TV. It's much better to sell now before you get desperate and sell cheap to pay bills. LCD sets do well on Craigslist.


To answer your power use question get a Kill-a-watt meter for $20 and do a power test to see how much your set uses at various settings. I think you will find the difference is minimal, but will find lots of other things in the house wasting lots of power



As far as extending the life goes, turn the TV off while not in use. Don't use the TV for "background noise". Very few LCD TV repairs I've done are actually the lamps in an LCD panel that have burned out. I have seen panels fail in other ways including bad ballasts/inverters, Tconn boards, lines in picture, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well I thank you for your reply....



I'm not in the poor house yet, but thats because I do look for ways to save money.


I do want to say. I would really appreciate a strait forward answerer to my questions.


Its sounds like the backlight out put will do little to save money on energy. ( although I'm not sure about that )


I guess I'm more concerned about the lifespan of my TV. I think I've read where plasmas loose their brightness after a few years....is it the same with LCD's?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom713 /forum/post/17029938


I did a search, but did not find what I was specifically looking for.


This pertains to my new Samsung LN52B630, but I'm sure its pretty much the same for all LCD TV's.


First when it comes to saving energy, is the backlight setting the most important or even the only setting that makes a difference? Or/and, does the brightness setting also contribute to energy use.


Also, will keeping the backlight set to a low setting improve the lifespan of your TV? And will the brightness setting, and maybe even the contrast setting also effect the lifespan?


I would appreciate any thoughts or comments on this.

CCFL backlight brightness level is by far the biggest contributor to LCD TV power usage. It contributes to around 70% of total power consumption.


brightness does not change the backlight intensity - it affects the signal that is sent to LCD panel only. However, contrast (if used in active contrast or dynamic contrast setting) will affect actual LCD TV panel contrast AS WELL AS backlight brightness level. Contrast setting used on its own will affect ONLY lcd panel contrast.


If the backlight level is set too high at all times, the CCFL output will deteriorate faster and the white colour temperature will change towards reddish / yellowish tones; you will slowly "loose" that bluish white LCD TV "trademark", as well as max. light output capability. This can only be noticed in direct comparison with the same model TV, but brand new. Of course, the drop in light output and change in colour temp can also be measured


Cheers,

Boky
 

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If you have suffered a job loss and don't expect your income to return to normal anytime soon sell the TV. It's much better to sell now before you get desperate and sell cheap to pay bills. LCD sets do well on Craigslist.


To answer your power use question get a Kill-a-watt meter for $20 and do a power test to see how much your set uses at various settings. I think you will find the difference is minimal, but will find lots of other things in the house wasting lots of power


QUOTE]


you will waste more money on the meter for 20.00 that you will ever use saving electricity on the tv
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by smooth2222 /forum/post/17035753


you will waste more money on the meter for 20.00 that you will ever use saving electricity on the tv

Lol. How true.


As said, we don't have real answers, 'coz we don't know, haven't thought about it. You be the first, do a through research and be the first to post the answer that may benefit more ppl who may come after you! But if I was you, I'd spend the time looking for that job, and maybe selling stuff no longer needed.
 

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We sort of understand importance of reducing power consumption…but we always do calculations that concern only our households… and we come-up with $20 dollars saving over a full year - which is nothing… but if we all cut consumption by 50 or 100 KWh per year… then we’ll be doing great favour to everyone on this Planet, including our children.


The focus of this thread is LCD efficiency… manufacturers will have to continue to cut the power consumption of their full LCD TV range… so that we do not have to make our simple calculations ourselves…concluding that we don’t care about 20 or even 100 dollars per year… we are already buying TV’s that consume less than 2 incandescent light bulbs (around 150 – 200W). I expect this to come down to 100W in couple of years, so we will make savings… not because we want to… but because we will be doing exactly that by default where no one is forcing us to save anything.


Boky
 

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Here are some real measurements a friend and I made for his TV, while adjusting the backlight (it says "brightness", which may be what the setting is called on that TV, but it was the definitely backlight level that we were adjusting):
http://www.wattster.com/product/view...cm9kdWN0GMwBDA


0% brightness: 110 watts

50% brightness: 220 watts

100% brightness: 330 watts


He ended up using 25% brightness, which was 165 watts or so and still totally watchable (0% was still quite visible -- not dark, but it looked washed out). It was previously on 100%. So with the new setting, he saves 30 days * (330 - 165) = about 5 kWhrs per hour of daily TV time per month. This TV happens to be on a lot; something like 12 hours a day. So that's 12 hours a day * 5 kWhr per hour = 60 kWhrs a month.


Electricity costs vary by region and usage, but they average something like $0.10 per kWhr. So that's 60 kWhrs * $0.10 per = $6 a month.


At $6/month it would take less than 4 months to pay for buying the Kill-A-Watt, even if adjusting the TV backlight was the only thing he used it for.


In reality this TV owner has an electric pool heater and other energy drains and is way over baseline. Electricity costs rise sharply as you go over baseline, so I think this change saved energy that was costing more like $0.40 a kWhr, or $24 a month. So his Kill-A-Watt paid for itself in less than a month.


-Max
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks Maxcooper....agian very informative.


I know from some of the responses here that saving energy, or prolonging the life of your TV is not important...and thats ok.


Yet I'm sure to some here it is.


I have found that you can turn down the backlight to as little as 6, while turning up brightness and perhaps contrast, the picture quality can still be very pleasing.


Granted, maybe you'll only save a couple of bucks or extend the life of the TV a year or 2, but it all adds up.
 

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Interesting info. I keep my backlight kinda low, for reasons not mentioned.

I use my Sony 46" as a Mac Mini monitor, HTPC and its easier to read bright web pages, email, etc at lower light levels, esp if the room is dark. Also I hope it reduces heat output, and some longevity. lower energy use is good also, of course.
 
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