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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm about ready to start my basement theater. I could also use info on how to post pics.

The room is 16' wide x 30' long. I was thinking of building a wall on each side of the posts but then this creates a problem with installing a door. There is a 3-1/2" wide wood beam (rather than steel) on top of these posts. I could enclose all the posts inside a 2x6 wall but then this creates a sound isolation problem. Anyone have any ideas on how to solve this?
 

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Why would enclosing the posts cause a sound isolation issue? Assuming you build the wall using standard sound isolation techniques and don't couple the poles, you should be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·



Looking towards the front of theater.

If I enclose the posts wouldn't the sound transmit up through the top plate and into the beam?

I'm also not sure about what to do with the cutout on the right. It's only 2' deep so I'm thinking of framing a wall past it. Any ideas?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kensmith48 /forum/post/15461906


I'm also not sure about what to do with the cutout on the right. It's only 2' deep so I'm thinking of framing a wall past it. Any ideas?

How about designing a built-in cabinet for your media storage and A/V components. You could run all of your cables behind the cabinet and have everything at your disposal. Run some conduit as well for future cables.


ft
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, I thought of that, but 2' depth makes it hard to get at the back without pulling it away from the wall.
 

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Another mid-Michigainer, hello!


Ideally you'd have the new theater walls outside all of all theater walls.This is so much easier. You avoid the columns, the beam they support, etc.


You can incorporate the columns in the theater walls, and then build a soffit to cover the beam and ducts, but you'll have to plan carefully.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kensmith48 /forum/post/15463730


Thanks, I thought of that, but 2' depth makes it hard to get at the back without pulling it away from the wall.

You could talk to a clever carpenter/woodworker and come up with something on wheels/tracks that could pull out easily.


Or you could build in false backs to your cabinets that can be removed (after taking the shelves out, or course) easily to allow for cable/power access. You have 2 feet to work with, so reserving 6" behind the false wall will still allow for 18" of shelf space. Most components are shallower than 18", so you're still good there. If you need deeper shelves, you could make the whole thing a little deeper or just "bow" out the center while leaving the ends of the cabinets at 2 feet.


There are lots of options for you here. I'm really feeling the wheels/tracks idea. I'm sure with some thoughtful planning and clever hardware, you could come up with something really cool with lots of WOW! factor.


Good Luck!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kensmith48 /forum/post/15461906


I'm also not sure about what to do with the cutout on the right. It's only 2' deep so I'm thinking of framing a wall past it. Any ideas?

I'd never throw away space or square footage. do some built in shelves or something at the very least, don't just throw it away. I'd try to find a way to do the equipment rack in that space or something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a Salamander Synergy a/v/ rack on casters and I thought I'd put it in the rear of the theater so that I could access the back of it from another room. In my previous house I was always pulling it out away from the wall. This wasn't easy, since it was on carpet and didn't roll very easily. I'm thinking that cutout on the side might be a problem with acoustics. It's probably alot easier to just frame past it.


Hi Ted,

I've e-mailed you before, but with my crazy work schedule, we never did meet. I'm thinking of using your soundproffing techniques, but I'm not sure if they're in the budget. It's just me and the wife so there isn't too much sound that would bother either one of us.I used to live in Midland, but now I'm closer to Auburn.

I'm not sure what you meant by your statement about "new theater walls outside of all other theater walls". Could you clarify?

I should point out that my wife wants a small room for herself on the opposite side of the posts and the theater would be to the right.
 

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Although my situation is not the same is yours, I did have to do something about the poles and I-beam. For me, going on the outside of the I-beam, I was able to gain an extra foot in room width. This was critical for me with the seats that I was going with. This allowed just enough room to walk comfortable to the second row. I built the walls on the outside of the I-beams, by doing this, this made the I-beams part of the room. With the walls up, I made the frame work to enclose the I-beams so then there was a soffit running the length of the room. I still had to deal with the poles supporting the I-beams. I was going to do something decorative, but the poles are off center from each other. Not only that, the poles are very close to the riser. With them being off center, you would really notice this and my OCD would not allow that. I made four bump outs two of them enclose the poles by the riser. I made them wide enough so that the enclosures would be inline with each other, even though the poles were not.


As far as soundproofing that really wasnt a concern, although I did fill the cavities with insulation to prevent resonance. Here are some pics to better describe:







 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
stiddrvr,

Thanks for the info. I just got back from Home Depot w/ 2x6's. I decided to put the 2 poles inside the wall. Since on one side is the theater and the other side is the wife's room I had to hide them somewhere. The poles are only about a 1/2" difference so it should work. I only hope I can find a door wide enough for 2x6's + dd 5/8"+ 1/2 dw on the outside.
 

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Oh yeah definitely use that 2' for some storage. At the very least some base cabinets and a counter top. A base cabinet for a kitchen is 2' deep, so that's a perfect depth. Maybe put an av cabinet on the left side so you can access it from the room behind. Would have been a bit easier if those ducts were on the other side of the posts, but you have a great space, it's be fun when its done!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kensmith48 /forum/post/15461906


You could probably move one of those main HVAC trunks to the right side of the room and build a soffit to enclose them ... looks like that one would slide right into that 2' recessed wall
 

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You need to make sure the order of operations from theater to wife's rooms is:


Double Drywall

Wood Stud framing with insulation

Air Cavity

Wood Stud framing with insulation

Double Drywall


stisrvr has a very nice theater build there. A suggestion for you Ken, is to perhaps not to have drywall in between the finished walls (leaves). One big air cavity from room to room with no drywall in between.


Does this make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ted,

If I understand you correctly--you mean to build a wall on either side of the posts with an air cavity in between. I was thinking of doing it that way but then I couldn't figure out how to put a door to the theater somewhere in between the 1st and 2nd posts in my picture. The width of the 2 walls would be approx. 12" wide.
 

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Yes, that's it. The door would have field installed extension jambs. Better yet, install two doors. FAR higher isolation
 

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I agree with the pull out style rack. They make some drawer slides now-a-days that can move a LOT of weight. Something to consider.


You and I have similar challenges to deal with in our basement spaces. I had very similar posts to deal with in my basement:



I surrounded them using plastic collars (from McFeely's website) with a 2x6 on two of the sides:




Just before the columns were drywalled shut I stuffed some extra R-13 insulation I had lying around into all the nooks in the columns:



To be completely honest I cannot hear any sounds from the theater on the floor above it unless I have the system turned up beyond reference levels. There is also no rattling from the posts at all. When I tap on the posts all I hear is a solid "thump".


Hope that gives you another perspective.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Anyone give me a link or manufacturer of these pull out racks. I suppose I should have a look. If nothing else I'm thinking of framing it out just for the dvd rack that's sitting there now.
 
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