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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have 2/3 questions regarding A/V and network distrobution


Question #1

I need to distribute one coax line to ~16 TVs. Right now it is all connected with a patch work of radio shack/lowes splitters and amps, and the signal quality is bad at best. What is the best splitter and amp combo? and what is the best layout?


Question #2/3

My parents are building a new house, what is the best value for Coax distribution and networking? They will need 8-12 coax terminations and 16-32 ethernet jacks. is it possible to run all of those coax lines off of one good antena or will they need multiple?


So what are your thoughts? and any info on whole house control costs would be helpful also.


Thanks,

JJ
 

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In both cases the best approach is to put an amp at the antenna or signal source and then use splitters from there. With a good amp you only need one antenna. Just select a known brand of amp with good gain and a low noise figure, particularly in the UHF where most digital stations are located.
 

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If you're willing to put in the time, and be patient, you can DIY these projects.


Otherwise, hire a LV installer/CI.


Not projects to find a solution in a single thread.


BUT - Channel Vision RF distribution modules are slightly less expensive than Leviton and OnQ. Leviton equipment is sold at Home Depot, OnQ at Lowes.


AND - your parents won't need all those ethernet jacks. Wire them all to a 'home run' location (wiring closet), but they'll only need a handful, wired through a SWITCH to the router. Buy a Linksys, Netgear, or DLink switch (not CV/Leviton/OnQ).


Some people mount the distribution modules inside a metal or PVC wiring enclosure ('can'), and others mount them on a piece of plywood hanging on a wall.


Whole house control is usually expensive (Control4) or extremely expensive (Crestron, AMX, RTI), installed by a professional. Unless you want to put the time and energy into DIY (but it's still not cheap) - DIY options include CQC, HomeSeer, Girder, Johnny9, MainLobby, and many others. DIY whole house control isn't something that's easily accomplished - you have to enjoy the process, or you will fail.


Meet with some local CI's to discuss pricing of control. Pricing depends on how much control you want - distributed audio, distributed video, lights, home theater, cameras, touchscreens, doorbell, paging, intercoms... Look at the Control4 website for a list of local authorized installers. Whole house control costs can be bundled with a mortgage, if done during construction.
 
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