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I often do frequency analysis on my music so that I can see how what I'm hearing correlates to the actual frequency balance in the music.


The most common frequency spread I see has the low frequency peaking in the 30-45hz range, falling off somewhere in that range. When the music gets louder (or more intense, since the actual level barely increases due to increasing compression the newer the music is), the lowest bass does not change in volume, but instead the 50-100hz range usually increases in level.


The second most common trend I see is when the peak occurs in the 50-100hz range, falling slowly to 30hz and then dropping off.


The third most common is where the peak occurs in the 40-60hz range and slowly falls to 20hz, dropping off.


Take note that these observations are within my personal music collection.


Within individual genres, I find most pop music to have the least extension (what a surprise, huh?), peaking at 50-60hz usually and dropping off. Some goes to 40hz, depending. Some will go lower, of course. I am making generalizations.


Rock and metal will usually peak between 35-45hz and drop below 30hz. Sometimes it will peak around 100hz, but still have decent energy to 30-40hz.


Industrial (at least what I have) tends to have strong peaks in the 30hz range, either dropping off around 30hz or going down to 20hz at times (not with HUGE amounts of energy, usually 10dB lower than the peak in the 30hz range).


Another generalization is that the newer the music, the more extension the low frequencies tend to have (considering that the engineers of the music are mixing/mastering for the speakers and systems used at the time AND the medium of transport, and today's systems tend to have more extension).


Some electronic stuff I have (not bass music like Bass Mekanik, but actual well-known dance/electronic music) will have peaks in the 20hz range with strong response to 15-16hz.



I am aware that this is a bit of a shallow analysis and is mostly restating what we already know and has been discussed.


I personally have a sonosub with an 18" driver. Things don't seem quite right (I have had it for a year now) and I am currently attempting to figure out what the issue is by experimenting. It is possible that it is something obvious I am overlooking.


I did not include movies in this since it is known that they will extend very low. I watched a movie called Deja Vu yesterday and the bass was very dynamic and deep, although something seemed to be missing. I have hypothesized it as a mid-bass issue.


Information without focus... my .000000000314159 cents.
 

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i have performed quite a bit of spectral content analysis of music and generally agree with your findings. however, bass mekanik peaks surprisingly high around 50hz on their title track (track 2, bassest hits, cd), with big hits at around 40hz and little to nothing under 30hz.


"I personally have a sonosub with an 18" driver. Things don't seem quite right (I have had it for a year now) and I am currently attempting to figure out what the issue is by experimenting. It is possible that it is something obvious I am overlooking."


what seems wrong?


have you run a frequency sweep of your sub at the listening position. typically, a peak or null, will be the primary culprit. peak type resonances can make your sub sound sloppy or slow. null type cancellations can make your sub sound weak.


i don't frequent this thread too much, but i try to keep an eye on what is going on in the diy area. if you want a quick reply, pm to me. i'll try to help you out.
 

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I have to agree with the second poster.

Might be a "null" where u sit. Example in my bedroom i sit at lease 10 inches from back wall and i get full bass from 50-100 hz but when i move forward i loose the mid bass. and when i move more forward the upper mid bass comes back. all rooms has nulls. nothing can fix it. even movie cinemas has them.
 

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"even movie cinemas has them."


peaks and nulls are *much* more of a problem in "small" rooms (such as home rooms, even large home rooms/theaters) as compared with "large" rooms (commercial theaters, auditoria, etc.).
 

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Relatively small movements of your subwoofer, especially toward/away from walls/corners, can alter the bass response significantly at the listening position. You'd still need to do frequency sweeps to see what improvements (if any) you've made. This would be the first step in improving the bass if I were doing it.


Also, you might consider room treatment (bass traps) to smooth the bass response. It all depends upon what the problem is. If you have a peak at a certain frequency at the listening position, then bass trapping can help. If you have a null, then my first suggestion can help.


Finally, you might experiment with the crossover frequency to the sub. Perhaps you're cutting out some reinforcement from the mains that you need near the crossover frequency, etc.


Lee
 
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