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On the Bass Shakers which is positive and which is negative. I have a copper wire and a silver wire.


THanks,


-jYm-
 

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If I was to quess I would say the copper is positive. That said I think it's more important that they all be wired the same. I dont think this becomes a phasing issue. But I could be wrong. You could maybe test with one of the demo/test disks when finished and switch the amp connection to see if you perceive a difference at bass frequencies.


Jim Mc

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Okay, okay. This is the corniest response you'll ever get to ANY question.


To remember which color code is which, I think of the theme song from "The Beverly Hillbillies." Do you remember the part in the song when Uncle Jed discovers oil?


"Black gold, Texas tea."


Well, just connect the black insulated wire to the copper (or "gold ") wire. [Hence, black gold.] Then the red insulated one connects to the zinc one.


I know. I know. It's goofy. Many, many apologies, but -hey- it works.


Mike
 

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Maybe it is just me, but I have always used the copper colored wire as the red or positive and the silver as the black or negative. I know that the silver is nowhere near being black, but the copper is much closer to red than the silver.


That said, I second Jim Mc's comments on making sure that they are all wired the same (phase). That way, if you have two on a couch, they don't cause the thing to feel like it is rocking as one is pumping up and the other is pumping down. O.K., bad analogy. You don't want one to cancel out the other's effect, so if they are wired together (especially when mounted to the same surface) make sure that you coordinate the wires.


I have six Aura shakers hooked to three love seats. Three in series, in two rows that are run parallel, to equal out to 6 ohms total load that the amp is seeing.


I used this load calculator to figure it out:
Load calculator
 
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