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Discussion Starter #1
Here is what I'm starting with. This has to be beefed up significantly.



For this one, I was thinking of removing all windows and using furring channels on all 5 sides with sonoclips, DD/GG/MDF with a backing of acoustimat rubber VB, Roxul and then R-20. Dricore and padded carpet on the floor.

Single studded 2x4 until spring time, and then if need-be, beefed up to double-studded and/or another DD/GG/MDF and/or with cinderblocks.


Basically, I'm trying to contain 100% of the bass... ideally / if possible



The slab is currently 20x16ft, but I'll be adding another 8ft to the front, and upgrading the 50amp to a 100amp run.

It will have an amp rack, projector hood, AC, wall heaters, track lighting, and a security alarm.


I was thinking of possibly making my own 400lb exterior soundproofed security-door, and then having another inner sliding-glass door; if need be... one of these: http://www.soundproofwindows.com/recording_studio_doors.html

 

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Well, if you consider double 5/8" drywall damped doesn't even contain 80hz...if you want to contain 10hz you'll need to at least go to 8 times the thickness to get equal results....and it still won't contain 100% of 10hz. ...and that's if it is a linear function. So figure 1.25"x8=10" thick at least. A thread on the dedicated HT forum would get you more info.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Andreas, How did you figure those numbers?


By my calculations, that would already give me 7.7inches of top-notch high-STC material it has to work its way through. (That's not too shabby.)


It's not JUST two 5/8's of plain vanilla Drywall...but rather WITH sonoclips and GG, and 3/4 MDF with a backing of acoustimat, and the Roxul, and the R-20 and the exterior plywood, and the siding; and then it has to go through 5ft of air, a hardwood fence, and then another 60ft of air, and then (usually) through the external walls of someone's house, before they can hear it.


The door is usually the weakest point for a self-contained structure, that's why I'm leaning towards going a little bit fancy with it and maybe even the inner glass door.


I'm fairly certain nothing above 300hz would get out of the room. It's the 20-300hz band that humans can hear fairly easily (and get very annoyed with) that has me most worried about.



Here's an example of the level of bass it has to be able to stop, except with the other 4 channels going as well

 

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The FG, clips, double wall, accoustimat and sealing will help contain mostly the high frequencies. The low frequencies will just shake the whole structure...they are not airborne like high freqs. Think of a ported sub or a rotary sub's chamber. To pass low freqs they have to be big. What stops the structure from shaking? Mass. I am not sure why stiffness doesn't come into play other than it will increase the resonant frequency...and supposedly you want to lower it. Below or at that frequency the walls will just shake and transmit low freqs freely.


If I were to do it all over again and go for some real ULF isolation I would look into solid concrete walls not touching the structure's walls. You wouldn't need clips, GG, accoustimat, but you'd need to hire someone to pour the concrete....and then do a solid concrete ceiling (also THICK). Mind you, I don't know if this would be the way to go....I just would look into the option. You'd need some room height to spare also.


You are right about the door. Best is two communicating doors. Since the STC is a log function having a door at 30 db and the walls at 60db mean a room at 40 db depending on the ratio of room to door area.


I think there is probably a reason why these types of rooms cost millions of $ and are usually located underground! You really should consult with Ted or Dennis if you want to do it right...they are experts and will get you closer to your goal while avoiding spending money on something that wont work.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Looks like many layers of iron sheets would be the way to go, or rebar filled blocks... and cork would be a very bad thing.



lb/ft^3 Material

1206 Gold

1192 Depleted Uranium

846 Mercury

709 Lead

655 Silver

559 Copper
491 Iron

465 Tin

445 Zinc

283 Titanium

200 Slag

193 Diamond
180 Cement

170 Aluminium

167 Limestone
160 Glass

160 Marble

150 Gravel

150 Asbestos

144 Pure Gypsum
120 Red Brick

100 Sand

074 Acrylic

074 Rubber

062 Water
047 MDF

045 Asphalt

043 Cardboard
042 Drywall

035 Lumber

035 Plywood

015 Cork
 

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The good thing about sand, is it remains somewhat soft/fluid and more able to convert vibrations into heat as opposed to hard/dense objects.
 

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By far the most cost effective is masonry block wall construction filled with either concrete or sand. Poured concrete is great if you have a hookup that can handle the molds and pouring at a good price.


Looking at that pick, since there is an existing outer structure and siding you're talking about an inner wall. How much room inside can you spare? An 8" block spaced from the existing framing an inch or so should do the trick. Gonna need a serious ceiling too though. Either solid performed slab ceiling or something deep/rigid enough to support several layers of bonded materials.


For ulf, you want both mass and stiffness.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BassThatHz  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it/0_50#post_22533232


Basically, I'm trying to contain 100% of the bass... ideally / if possible

Whatever you come up with, make sure you have a plan for ventilation. If you get it tight enough to keep the bass in, you'll need to provide a way to get fresh air in/stale air out or you won't be able to use the room.


I second the suggestions on posting to the dedicated HT forum. There are lots of knowledgeable people over there when it comes to sound containment.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BassThatHz  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it#post_22534904


Looks like many layers of iron sheets would be the way to go...
Zinc and iron. Start collecting engine blocks and pennies to melt down!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BeerParty  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it#post_22541101


Whatever you come up with, make sure you have a plan for ventilation. If you get it tight enough to keep the bass in, you'll need to provide a way to get fresh air in/stale air out or you won't be able to use the room.
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it#post_22541133


Dig hole right beside structure. Put structure in said hole. Pour additional concrete around structure in the hole. Bury structure with storm shelter type steps to access main entrance. Done
Yup. Build it underground with reinforced concrete, zinc and iron walls. Tell the neighbors your building a zombie apocalypse shelter. They'll believe that before they believe it's to keep LF in.
 

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Level that structure and build using insulated concrete forms. The toughest part will be the ceiling. Adding mass there is the toughest. You might be stuck with multiple layers of DW and GG. I would suggest talking to an expert to be honest. You will be spending a good chunk of money so you might as well bring in someone who has experience with something this crazy.
 

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I was thinking, wouldn't he want something that isn't too dense in order to absorb the waves? It just occurred to me that back in the 90's when I was into competition car audio (when JL was cutting their teeth), I had a nasty problem with the hatch on my Escort vibrating like mad from 4 12W1's. No amount of Dynamat helped and the back of the car sounded like it was going to fall off, despite it being an Escort. I ripped all the plastic interior panels off and filled every cavity with with Great Stuff expanding foam. There was NO resonance from the rear of that car at all afterwards. A knock anywhere on the rear resulted in a solid "thunk" instead of a hollow "thud".


Now, where is this going? Because at $4 a can, it would cost a fortune to do a building! Well, there are very similar products used in the home building industry for insulation purposes that are applied in large quantities with a spray gun. I know these products vary in expansion amounts and I have no doubt that it would help greatly.
 

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This was mentioned earlier but think 6 walls of concrete bunker to contain all the waves and then wall treatments to make that room sound good. I would suggest building a closet off the side for your equipment so it does not heat up so much in there. What about air conditioning and heating? Basements work great! Oh wait, say good bye to that $10K.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by coctostan  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it#post_22541161


Level that structure and build using insulated concrete forms. The toughest part will be the ceiling. Adding mass there is the toughest. You might be stuck with multiple layers of DW and GG. I would suggest talking to an expert to be honest. You will be spending a good chunk of money so you might as well bring in someone who has experience with something this crazy.

A typical cast in place concrete ceiling has a lot of flex. You would be surprised at how much bounce and flex they have. I have done several multi-story cast in place structural concrete buildings. You may not like the results.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AV Science Sales 5  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it#post_22541695


A typical cast in place concrete ceiling has a lot of flex. You would be surprised at how much bounce and flex they have.

I was thinking the same thing. And everything has a resonant frequency (Fs). I'd be worried about that cast ceiling resonating over time and cracking.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MKtheater  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it/0_40#post_22541564


This was mentioned earlier but think 6 walls of concrete bunker to contain all the waves and then wall treatments to make that room sound good. I would suggest building a closet off the side for your equipment so it does not heat up so much in there. What about air conditioning and heating? Basements work great! Oh wait, say good bye to that $10K.

Is that not more trouble than it is worth to get good in room response? Sure it keeps noise from getting out, believe me I know.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JapanDave  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it#post_22545085


Is that not more trouble than it is worth to get good in room response? Sure it keeps noise from getting out, believe me I know.

It is about keeping all the bass inside the room.
 

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Isn't the most important thing to decouple your inner room from the outer room? So… Take what you've got, and build a second high mass enclosure completely separated from your inside one. That way less of the sound can get moving the structure and outside where you can hear it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by MKtheater  /t/1436049/i-have-10-000-help-me-spend-it/0_40#post_22545159


It is about keeping all the bass inside the room.

What about RT60 times and room modes?
 
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