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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Behringer is a very powerful amplifier, offering 450w per channel into 8ohms. It weighs 17.4Kg.

The first impression is the Ep2500 was positive as the midrange with excellent resolution and detail. Very relaxed sound. Can play very loud without any strain. Easy-on-the-ears sound quality.


But then I realized that the bass wasn't too tight, knotty or powerful. Then the treble was rolled off a bit. Obviously the sound has been tailored to not irritate during live performance, even if there is crappy A/C power or FRI/EMI interference.

But not an audiophile amplifier by any means.


Switching back to the reference Crown K1 STUDIO amplifier immediately reminded me of what Crown has always claimed about the K series:

"Best of all, the K Series delivers all of the superior sound that Crown is known for - tight, chest-slamming low end, crystal-clear highs and a well-defined midrange. Several exceptional product reviews concur that the K Series delivers fantastic sound. The K Series stands above the rest as the performance leader in convection-cooled designs."


Now I know just why they said that! This leads me to believe that the sound quality described of the EP2500 above is typical of most professional road amplifiers.


Conclusion

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The Behringer EP2500 is a knock-off of the QSC which sells for twice as much.

From weight, parts quality and appearance they both are an exceptional values.

But consumers should to pass them up.


BTW, the Behringer A500 STUDIO amplifier is due to arrive this Friday and will be reported in the other thread.


Main Review system:

2K watt balanced transformer with Belkin PF60 filtered, isolated power

Krell Showcase processor using balanced outputs

Crown K1 amplifier

Gallo Reference 3 speakers
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by reincarnate
This leads me to believe that the sound quality described of the EP2500 above is typical of most professional road amplifiers.
Except for the better-quality ones.
 

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Quote:
This leads me to believe that the sound quality described of the EP2500 above is typical of most professional road amplifiers.
I don’t think anyone would qualify the EP 2500 as a touring amplifier.


Regards,

Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

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But then I realized that the bass wasn't too tight, knotty or powerful.


Another review;
http://srforums.prosoundweb.com/inde...15b1#msg_27765

I own 3 EP2500 from Behringer i push dual 15's Jbl's 2 per amp and they work great! i have had one amp push 4 of this dual 15'' Jbls at 2 Ohm at is max and it works flawless...


Another review;
http://srforum.prosoundweb.com/viewt...1643a39ca1c933

Stereo Testing:

This amplifier performs very well under 8 – 2 ohm configuration, when used for Mid to High Frequency applications. Mismatched loads seem not to bother the amplifier either. In Bass applications, this amplifier performs very well under 8 – 4 ohm configurations. Occasional clipping is not audible to the point of being noticeable. It clearly has a strong enough power supply to withstand a clipped signal without oscillating.

Bridged Mono Testing:

This amplifier performs well under 4 ohm configuration considering its price point. The one thing I should note is the audible distortion this amplifier offers when not using its limiters located in the back of the amplifier (Dip Switch 1, and, 10) when driven into clip. Although the amplifier heats up rather quickly (2 ½ to 3 minutes) it doesn’t shut down. However, the amplifier starts to run out of gas the more you drive it into clip, and, will begin to start distorting more, reducing its gain abruptly, and, shutdown. Although it shuts down, it tries to reset itself very quickly (Around 1 second). Providing, you use the amplifier with little to no clipping , the amplifier performs well.

Short Circuit Testing:

This amplifier fully protects itself when it is driving a 4 ohm load, bridged mono, elevated heating, and, accidentally encounters a shorted speaker wire within the chain.

Heating Up, Cooling Down:

The amplifier heats up under low impedance, high SPL use in ruffly 3 minutes. This amplifier cools itself off completely in 2 minutes tops, with no signal passing through, when driven at high SPL’s, under low impedances.


The woofers conducted under the bass test were the Beyma 18 LX 60, and, JBL 2441. The impedance dip according to the cabinet design were 6 ohms on the JBL, and, 7.4 on the Beyma. (Lowest impedance dip when used from 100 – 30Hz)


Note: Both woofers were used together when testing this amplifier to give the worst case scenario of using multiple brand speakers under these conditions.

The Music:

For the bass testing, the CD Maroon 5, was selected. Using tracks, Harder To Breathe, and, This Love, which offers a strong emphasis on the kick drum.

Conclusion:

At a price point of $350.00, this amplifier performs very well, under the given conditions. This amp would be perfect for a Band, or, DJ, that wants power, but is on a budget.



/////
[Note] - the last sentence reflects that this is a proaudio review, not

a home audio review so the 'band' and 'DJ' comment is appropriate.


//////


Reality check;


EP2500 - $300

QSC RMX 2450 - $600 {it's competitor}

K1 cost $1000


The EP2500 has a smaller transformer inside compared to the QSC, so of course it's going to output less power, but the price is 1/2 so you arn't getting ripped off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Here is the Tapco (Mackie) which upon close examination is easily on par with the QSC. Behringer is, in my opinion stripping off to much in parts quality in their newer products to meet a lower price point. They are NOT a real value.


The most important point of this post is that the Tapco Juice J2500 amplifier has been reduced in price from $550 to $399. The juice also uses the NE5532 op-amp which are excellent as compared to the TL072 inferior op-amps in the Crown XLS series.


However the two fans in the J2500 use sleeves and not ball bearings. Bad!


80*80*25 AD0812US-A70GL Sleeve bearing 12VDC 0.38A 4.56W 3700rpm 46.7CFM 38.5DB/A $7.50 Original Tapco J2500 fan

80*80*25 AD0812LB-A70GL Ball Bearing 12VDC 0.12A 1.44W 2100rpm 28.1CFM 22.5DB/A $11.15 Similiar but improved low noise fan for home theater
 

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reincarnate:


does your observation of the Tapco also apply to the Tapco J-1400?


And as far as the fans go, has anyone considered or done a mod to quiet them?


Thanks,

Gerry
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry S
reincarnate:


does your observation of the Tapco also apply to the Tapco J-1400?


And as far as the fans go, has anyone considered or done a mod to quiet them?


Thanks,

Gerry
I don't know much about the J1400. The J2500 is a two stage Class H amplifier, unlike the J1400 which is class AB only.


The J2500 has a very wide dynamic range, as it should with its power rating. It is still being broke in, but sounds quite promising. I am in the process of constructing and assembling 12 and 15" super sound quality woofers from oaudio.com and soundsplinter.com. Which is why I'm adding very powerful woofer amplifiers, not those cheap, inferior, unbalanced input, integrated and convenient Booby Carver down tracking plate amplifiers.


J2500 consumes 0.6 amps at idle or 72 watts. DC output offset voltage is 8 and 12 millivolts. No transformer hum or speaker noise whatsoever.


As for the fans mods, I've determined that only the back fan is necessary. I cut out the back part of the chassis which "protects" the fan as it restricts the air flow to much (in my opinion). Removing the one fan causes the remaining fan to speed up. I installed an Antec computer fan with a 100 ohm 10w resister is series with the 12V supply as a temporary fix. The low noise/lower rpm fan listed above should work even better.

The XLS amplifiers have better stock fans than this Tapco. Tapco took no effort in their design to reduce fan noise, so rubber gourmets may help here too. But the Tapco has superior and more powerful (yet at ease) sound quality which makes it worth the effort. Actually this is fun for me and there is no other way to achieve superior sound quality without taking out a second mortgage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't know much about the J1400. The J2500 is a two stage Class H amplifier, unlike the J1400 which is class AB only.


The J2500 has a very wide dynamic range, as it should with its power rating. It is still being broke in, but sounds quite promising. I am in the process of constructing and assembling 12 and 15" super sound quality woofers from oaudio.com and soundsplinter.com. Which is why I'm adding very powerful woofer amplifiers, not those cheap, inferior, unbalanced input, integrated and convenient Booby Carver down tracking plate amplifiers.


J2500 consumes 0.6 amps at idle or 72 watts. DC output offset voltage is 8 and 12 millivolts. No transformer hum or speaker noise whatsoever. The circuit breaker is rated at 20 amps - real muscle power here.


As for the fans mods, I've determined that only the back fan is necessary. I cut out the back part of the chassis which "protects" the fan as it restricts the air flow to much (in my opinion). Removing the one fan causes the remaining fan to speed up. I installed an Antec computer fan with a 100 ohm 10w resister is series with the 12V supply as a temporary fix. The low noise/lower rpm fan listed above should work even better.

The XLS amplifiers have better stock fans than this Tapco. Tapco took no effort in their design to reduce fan noise, so rubber gourmets may help here too. But the Tapco has superior and more powerful (yet at ease) sound quality which makes it worth the effort. Actually this is fun for me and there is no other way to achieve superior sound quality without taking out a second mortgage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerry S
reincarnate:


does your observation of the Tapco also apply to the Tapco J-1400?


And as far as the fans go, has anyone considered or done a mod to quiet them?


Thanks,

Gerry
I don't know much about the J1400. The J2500 is a two stage Class H amplifier, unlike the J1400 which is class AB only.


The J2500 has a very wide dynamic range, as it should with its power rating. It is still being broke in, but sounds quite promising. I am in the process of constructing and assembling 12 and 15" super sound quality woofers from oaudio.com and soundsplinter.com. Which is why I'm adding very powerful woofer amplifiers, not those cheap, inferior, unbalanced input, integrated and convenient Booby Carver down tracking plate amplifiers.


J2500 consumes 0.6 amps at idle or 72 watts. DC output offset voltage is 8 and 12 millivolts. No transformer hum or speaker noise whatsoever. The circuit breaker is rated at a full 20 amps. Impressive!


As for the fans mods, I've determined that only the back fan is necessary. I cut out the back part of the chassis which "protects" the fan as it restricts the air flow to much (in my opinion). Removing the one fan causes the remaining fan to speed up. I installed an Antec computer fan with a 100 ohm 10w resister is series with the 12V supply as a temporary fix. The low noise/lower rpm fan listed above should work even better.

The XLS amplifiers have better stock fans than this Tapco. Tapco took no effort in their design to reduce fan noise, so rubber gourmets may help here too. But the Tapco has superior and more powerful (yet at ease) sound quality which makes it worth the effort. Actually this is fun for me and there is no other way to achieve superior sound quality without taking out a second mortgage.
 
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