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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
BENQ TK700STi Review, 4K HDR / Low Lag / Short Throw Gaming Projector

GAME CHANGER


The TK700STi is the latest UHD home entertainment projector from BenQ and comes to market with a feature set unique among it's 4K DLP competition. The headline feature here has to be Texas Instrument's brand new, low latency XPR chip which promises a mere 1 frame of input lag (16.7ms) for 4K/60Hz sources. BenQ has paired this with a true short throw lens capable of projecting a 100" image in as little as 6 and a half feet. The combination of low input lag and a short throw lens is one that was quite popular for 1080p DLP projectors back-in-the-day but this is the first time we've seen such a pairing in a 4K projector! Packing a high brightness rating of 3000 ANSI lumens, you won't need a fully blacked out room to get a fantastic image with the TK700STi either. Wrapped up in a surprisingly compact chassis and featuring BenQ's new AndroidTV streaming platform, is the BenQ TK700STi the new king of low lag, big screen gaming? Let's dig in to find out!

WHAT'S GOOD

Remarkably low input lag for gaming

Short throw lens can project a large screen in limited space
Super bright and exceedingly sharp
Included AndroidTV is snappy and easy to use

Compact and quiet chassis

WHAT COULD BE BETTER


Average contrast ratio
Limited zoom range and no lens shift

Included AndroidTV lacks support for Netflix


MANUFACTURER SPECS
Just the specs ma'am, just the specs


Resolution: 3,840x2,160 (4K)

HDR: HDR10, HLG

3D: No*

Color Gamut (MFR): 96% Rec.709

Color Wheel: 8 segment (RGBWRGBW)

Input Lag (MFR): [email protected] 16.67ms,
[email protected] 16.67ms,
[email protected] 8.33ms,
[email protected] 4ms

Lumens Rating (MFR): 3000 ANSI

Throw Ratio: 0.9-1.08:1 (100" @ 6.5ft)

Zoom Ratio: 1.2x

Lens Shift: None

Keystone: Auto Vertical & Manual Horizontal +/- 30 degrees, Picture Rotation Adjustment

Lamp Life: 4,000-15,000 hrs

Speaker: 5W mono

Smart Streaming: Android TV (dongle)

Remote: Bluetooth/IR with mic (Android), not backlit

Video Inputs: 3x HDMI 2.0b, HDCP 2.2 (HDMI2 supports ARC+, HDMI3 hidden compartment)

Other I/O: 1x USB Type A 1.5A, USB micro cable (hidden compartment), RS232, 3.5mm audio out

Dimensions (WxHxD): 12.3" x 4.3" x 9.7"

Weight: 6.83 lbs

Warranty: 3 Year Projector, 1 Year or 2000 hrs Lamp (whichever comes first)

Price: $1699 USD

(*Not available at launch, return service will be required to add it)


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HARDWARE TOUR
Welcome… to the grand tour


Unpacking the TK700STi you'll find the projector, BenQ's QS01 AndroidTV streaming stick, a natty Bluetooth/IR remote and a power cable. The first thing I'm struck by is how compact the TK700STi is. Most 4K DLPs are small but the TK700STi-- weighing a scant 7 lbs with a footprint barely larger than a legal pad-- is downright tiny!

The TK700STi's design is clean and classy if a bit understated. I like the dark front face plate and there's a couple of subtle 4K HDR logos to remind you of the tech lurking inside. The left and ride sides are largely left open for cooling and you can see the aluminum driver of the 5W chamber speaker peaking out from behind the right vent. Up top you'll find the power and menu/navigation controls as well as a cutout to access the zoom and focus control rings. The rings themselves have a nice high quality feel to them. The whole top plate has a subtle pattern to it which doesn't show up well in photos. The last I saw BenQ use a similar design element was on the HT2050A and I'm glad to see it’s return.

Around back you'll find all your I/O including two of the three available HDMI ports. The third is hidden away behind a removable cover secured with a screw and is sized just right to house the included QS01 AndroidTV media streamer. Installing the media stick is as simple as unscrewing the cover, sliding the plate off, plugging in the stick and then connecting the little micro USB power lead. The removable cover is shockingly stout and even includes a little pad to keep the streaming stick from vibrating in it's housing. Nice attention to detail here.

The included remote bares more than a passing resemblance to the one Apple includes with their Apple TV box. It feels similar too with it's soft rubber keys and slim profile. The remote offers IR as well as Bluetooth connectivity and has a built in microphone for voice search. The only hot key for streaming is, as you might expect, Prime Video. Unfortunately, the remote is not backlit. Memories of the soft orange glow of BenQ's traditional remote now tug at my heart strings.


SETUP
Hookin' up Shorty


One of the TK700STi's headline features is it's short throw lens. Plenty of 4K DLPs tout a short throw lens in their marketing but this TK700STi is shorter than most. With it I was able to fill my 100" screen with the projector just 6 and a half feet away-- most competitors would need at least 8-9 ft to do the same! This makes setup simple as you can just plop the projector down on a coffee table and point it at your screen or wall. I don't actually use a coffee table in my media room but I found a nice wooden crate in my fiancées work shop that worked all the same.

Alternatively, you could mount the projector to your ceiling. Since my mount is at the back of my room some 10 and a half feet away the TK700STi would be 'limited' to projecting an image roughly 135-160 inches in size. For those heroes that are aiming to use the TK700STi to produce monster screen sizes know that BenQ recommends a maximum "clear image size" of 200 inches.

Zoom range on the TK700STi is a modest 1.2X and there is no lens shift. In lieu of this, BenQ has included a comprehensive list of digital adjustments under the 3D Keystone menu. Here you'll find the ubiquitous vertical keystone correction, which here can be engaged to adjust automatically using the projectors built in leveler. But you'll also find up to 30 degrees of horizonal keystone for side projection and even a picture rotation adjustment if your table or mount is uneven. Overall, these digital placement options work rather well and make it easy to get a square image even if you can't place the projector optimally in your room. Even the typical cost to resolution that keystone imparts is lessened here thanks to the 4K resolution. There is, however, a major limitation of the 3D Keystone controls: they cannot be engaged at the same time GAME picture preset is engaged. Meaning if you wanted the lowest possible input lag with the TK700STi, you'll need to take extra care in lining up your projector with your wall/screen.

The short throw lens of TK700STi will likely mean the projector is positioned closer to the seating position than a conventional long throw model. Thankfully, the fan noise on the TK700STi is some of the least offensive I've heard and this is the first 4K DLP I've tested that doesn't have the buzz I've come to associate with 4K pixel shifting models. In my less than quiet apartment I measured a mere 36db in the projector's Normal bulb setting which dropped to 32db in Eco mode.

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Media Streamer

Configuring the QS01 Media Streamer is simple and quick. I had no issues finding my wifi and loading channels was a breeze-- that is, for every channel but one. Netflix is not natively supported on the QS01. BenQ is in talks with the streaming giant to get the service running on their device. In the meantime, they offer instructions for a work around by casting from another device. I didn't bother. I, like you, have probably six dozen devices in my home that can stream Netflix. Chances are, whatever you might be thinking about hooking up to the TK700STi probably has it too. Still, the exclusion is notable.

While the QS01 Media streamer is technically a separate device, once the stick is installed in the back of the projector and the remote is in your hand it feels just like any other smart display. For example, pressing home on the remote automatically takes you to the HDMI3 input where the streamer is housed. You can even navigate to the projector's settings from the AndroidTV's options menu. Everything feels snappy and cohesive and I appreciate that the streamer is removeable as it means trouble shooting and even upgrading will be easier down the line.

Built in Audio

Projectors aren't known for having the best built in speakers and the TK700STi, with it's single 5W speaker, is not going to change that discussion. It'll do in a pinch and dialogue is admirably intelligible but you'll really want to connect an external sound system to go with the big, bright picture. Thankfully, BenQ makes it easy to connect to external speakers via the ARC equipped HDMI2 port or the old-school 1/8" audio out port. I settled on the former to connect my Yamaha AV Receiver. U̶n̶f̶o̶r̶t̶u̶n̶a̶t̶e̶l̶y̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶Q̶S̶0̶1̶'̶s̶ ̶b̶u̶i̶l̶t̶ ̶i̶n̶ ̶B̶l̶u̶e̶t̶o̶o̶t̶h̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶n̶e̶c̶t̶i̶v̶i̶t̶y̶ ̶c̶a̶n̶n̶o̶t̶ ̶b̶e̶ ̶u̶s̶e̶d̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶c̶o̶n̶n̶e̶c̶t̶ ̶a̶ ̶B̶l̶u̶e̶t̶o̶o̶t̶h̶ ̶s̶p̶e̶a̶k̶e̶r̶ ̶o̶r̶ ̶s̶o̶u̶n̶d̶b̶a̶r̶.̶ EDIT: BenQ has since reached out to me and explained that the inability to connect to an external sound device using the QS01's Bluetooth feature is actually a bug and they'll be rolling out a fix soon.

LumiExpert

Rounding out our initial setup we'll look at a handy little feature I last saw on BenQ's own TH671ST. LumiExpert, when engaged, uses a light sensor behind the lens controls to automatically adjust the picture based on ambient light levels in the room. LumiExpert doesn't actually control lamp power but instead makes gamma adjustments on the fly to boost contrast and make dark content more visible under lighting. For testing purposes I left this feature OFF but I could see this being of use especially if the projector will be used during the day.

A Quick Note on 3D

While the TK700STi's manual states support for Full HD 3D the 3D picture mode has been disabled as, according to BenQ, 3D wasn't working as intended on the new Texas Instrument DMD. BenQ states that they are planning to roll out a firmware update when it is available from TI. Unfortunately this particular update will require the unit be sent back to BenQ for service (the TK700STi supports user upgradeable firmware normally). This will surely be a disappointment to 3D fans as DLP is one of last bastions of support for the abandoned format. I'll update this review when that update is made available.


MEASUREMENTS
Tales from the test bench


Input lag @60Hz
Game mode: 16.90ms
Outside Game mode: 33.52ms
While using 3D Keystone: ~38ms

Maximum peak output (Bright): 265 cd/m^2
Peak output (Cinema): 172 cd/m^2

Gamut coverage (Cinema)
Rec. 709: 97.3%
DCI-P3: 71.7%

Contrast (Cinema):
Normal lamp power: 1024:1
Eco lamp power: 1029:1
SmartEco lamp power (dynamic): 1754:1

Black Level cd/m^2 / White Level cd/m^2 (Cinema)
Normal lamp power: 0.1678 / 171.82
Eco lamp power: 0.1106 / 113.88
SmartEco lamp power (dynamic): 0.0823 / 144.45

Native 24Hz/24p: No

Operating Noise
Normal lamp: 36dB
Eco lamp: 32-33dB



PERFORMANCE AND CALIBRATION
Brightness, Color and Contrast oh my!


The TK700STi ships with the usual suspects of picture presets. Two of these, HDR10 and HDR Game, are only accessible when you connect an HDR source. The standard modes include: Bright, Living Room, Sport, Cinema, Game and User. First and foremost, if you're after the best gaming performance you'll want to skip straight to one of the Game presets (and ahead to my impressions of the BenQ's gaming performance) as these modes offer the lowest possible input latency. Bright is like most projector's bright modes in that it features the highest available output at the penalty of a strong green tint-- in this case a whopping 265nits! Fortunately there is still plenty of brightness on tap in the remaining picture modes which, surprisingly, all measure practically the exact same output of 170 nits (50fL or 1340 lumens on my 100" screen). Living Room is the vivid preset with it's cool default color temp and low gamma. Sport goes for a more neutral color temp but keeps the shallow gamma to make dark content more visible in bright rooms. Cinema is, as you might expect, the closest to reference out-of-the-box. This is where we'll evaluate the TK700STi's image performance.

Pre-Calibration:

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The TK700STi is a projector designed to compete with ambient light. If you're after a great image without needing to sacrifice brightness you can switch to the Cinema preset and not touch another dial. Out-of-the-box the TK700STi covers 97.3 percent of the Rec.709 color gamut (71.7% of DCI-P3) which is a bit better than BenQ's 96% claim. The default white point is close to our 6500K target at 6598K but, as you can see from the chart above, white balance leans a bit towards green. Gamma is relatively flat but is effected by errors near peak luminance which drags the gamma mean down to 2.07. Notably, skin tone errors are below 3dE which is fantastic as this is an area where poor out-of-box calibration can be really noticeable. While color saturation and hue are close to their intended targets, overall primary/secondary color performance scores a relatively poor 11dE. So what's going on here?

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In the chart above each column represent a different primary (red, green, blue, yellow, cyan and magenta respectively). The bands inside each column represent color luminance (lightness or intensity), color saturation and color hue. As you can see BenQ has done a really impressive job of ensuring that primaries are practically dead on target for saturation and hue right out-of-the-box. This is actually even better out-of-the-box performance than my factory calibrated HT3550! But color luminance throughout is about 20% below target for each of the primaries with blue coming in well under target by almost 40%. This has to do with how the TK700STi (and bright DLPs in general) produces it's image. In addition to the standard red, green and blue elements in it's color wheel the TK700STi adds a white slice. This white slice dramatically improves peak white output but does so at the expense of color brightness. Now, to be fair, this lack of color intensity is tough to spot in a room with a high degree of ambient light. In such a room the extra brightness and contrast afforded by the white slice helps give the image more pop. Where this becomes and issue is when you start turning down the lights in your room. In a dim or even dark room the lack of color luminance can cause the image look flat.

Luckily, BenQ allows us to control the degree to which the white slice is utilized through the Brilliant Color setting in the main picture menu. Despite it's name, Brilliant Color does not actually make color more brilliant. At it's default setting of 10, Brilliant Color is actually maximizing output and contrast at the expense of color luminance. As we adjust the setting down this brings color intensity back up but has a corresponding effect on overall image brightness. Dropping the Brilliant Color slider to zero brings color luminance in line but comes at a heavy cost to output. As the TK700STi is not a projector intended for a light controlled theater I began my calibration with an eye towards striking a compromise between overall brightness and good image quality.

Post-Calibration:

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I started my calibration by adjusting the setting that has the most immediate and noticeable impact on image quality: Brilliant Color. As I mentioned before the Brilliant Color setting can be adjusted to 10 different intensities with 0 representing off. What is nice is you can essentially use the Brilliant Color control as a dial to target a desired peak white for your particular room. For the TK700STi I tried to target a room with a moderate amount of ambient light meaning I was looking for between 100-120nits (cd/m^2) or 30-35fL. For reference, in my fully dark room I try to target around 55-75 nits (16-22fL) as anything brighter than 80 nits (23fL) actually causes me discomfort.

Dropping the Brilliant Color control to 4 gets us in the desired brightness range and makes for a noticeable increase in color luminance. From here we can set about improving the white point and removing that green tint from the grayscale. Using the 2 point white balance controls, grayscale errors now measure a mere 1.6 dE. Gamma has improved too and we're now measuring 2.18. Color luminance is still low across the board but it's a massive improvement and with the included CMS we can dial in our saturation and hue targets. With the reduction in peak white we've seen a reduction in overall contrast to 600:1. However, with the increase in color luminance the image now displays more depth in our dimmer room. From here I highly recommend engaging the smart eco lamp dimming. Doing so will actually deepen the black floor and dynamic contrast improves to 1176:1.


VIEWING EXPERIENCE

Almost a decade on from it's release, the original Avengers movie seems almost quaint compared to the comic book movies that have come since. But, it remains one of the best super hero flicks of all time and is a personal favorite. The 4K UHD re-release is a worthy addition to any MCU fan's library.

Avenger's opening scene is bathed in shadows and here the limited depth of DLP black levels are apparent and appear more a dark gray than true black. Notably, however, the image never gets murky and detail near black is clearly discernible. Skin tones look natural and, after our tinkering, everything just looks right. Highlights like the blasts from Loki's scepter have a nice pop not present in the SDR release. BenQ doesn't advertise the TK700STi as featuring their popular HDR Pro Tone mapping but I have to complement the Tk700STi's performance here nonetheless. Specular highlights are never blown out or lacking detail. Banding wasn't ever an issue during any of my viewing.

During the iconic team up scene during the battle of NYC the TK700STi acquits itself very well. From the vibrant red, white and blue of Captain America's shield to the subtle purple details in Hawkeyes suit-- the limited gamut reproduction in the test chart doesn't present much of an issue with actual content. If you pressed me I might say that Thor's cape isn't quite as rich of a red as it is on my reference projector but here, in isolation, the TK700STi looks fantastic. All the laser blasts, lightning bolts and fiery explosions make good use of the TK700STi's lumen muscle. Overall, the image depth and sense of dimensionality bellies the modest contrast spec.

The TK700STi does not have the ability to display 24Hz (24p) content natively like it's stable mate the TK850. Like the vast majority of 4K DLPs, the projector performs a 3:2 pulldown. I doubt too many people will even notice this but if you're a cinema fan and desire your movies without a hint of telecine judder you should be aware.


GAMING PERFORMANCE

I'm going to cut right to the chase: the TK700STi sets a new benchmark for gaming projectors. DLP front projection has long been a favorite of mine when it comes to gaming thanks to it's inherent advantages in motion handling and image clarity. We've had 1 frame/16.7ms 1080p DLP projectors for years but the TK700STi now brings that same responsiveness to 4K sources. In addition, BenQ has equipped the TK700STi with the ability to display 1080p resolutions at 120Hz and even 240Hz with a similar reduction in latency.

In Game mode I measured the TK700STi's input lag at 16.90ms for both 4K/60Hz as well as 1080p/60Hz. This is virtually perfect response for a 60Hz source and, when combined with the TK700STi's crisp motion handling, results in an excellent gaming experience. Controller inputs feel right now responsive. While I don't have a way to test for 120Hz/240Hz input latency, connecting my PC to the TK700STi and running the projector at 240Hz lent my mouse inputs an even greater sense of urgency than they do on my 144Hz gaming monitor.

One thing to note about the TK700STi is that in game mode when fed a 1080p source it will display that source as 1080p natively. That is, it will switch off it's pixel shifting and output a 1920x1080 image. This of course goes for 1080p sources at the higher refresh rates but also for 1080p/60Hz devices like the Nintendo Switch. The projector does this to offer the lowest possible input lag. Personally I prefer this as 1080p games always look best at 1080p resolution (in my opinion, I don't feel the same way about movies). We've used the TK700STi for more games of Mario Kart and Mario Party than I can possibly count and the modest Switch looks a lot better than you might imagine at 100" displayed in it's native resolution. If, however, you prefer to have your 1080p games upscaled to 4K you can by switching out of the game mode. This will raise input lag from 16.90ms to 33.52ms.

The game preset also grants access to three additional picture modes: FPS, SPG and RPG (first person shooter, sports game and role playing game, respectively). All three have the same latency and each offer picture enhancements like what you'd find on a gaming monitor. FPS flattens the gamma and raises black levels to make opponents more visible in shadows, SPG exaggerates color saturation and RPG is effectively the neutral setting and is best used when you care more about a pretty picture than gaining a competitive advantage.

Of course, the TK700STi doesn't have every bell and whistle available to a more traditional gaming monitor or some of the more advance gaming TVs. For starters, the TK700STi does not support variable refresh rate (VRR). It also cannot display 4K/120Hz. These items are not omissions but, rather, limitations of the current 4K front projection technology.

A quick detour into the topic of how input lag is measured and how DLP can produce clearer motion.

I often see input lag tests of TVs and monitors that claim latencies of less than 16.67ms for 60Hz sources. While this isn't strictly incorrect it is a bit misleading. A conventional LCD TV/monitor draws it's image line by line from the top of the screen to the bottom of the screen. For this reason when testing an LCD WHERE you measure on the screen will determine what result you get. Popular input lag testers like the Leo Bodnar or Time Sleuth (of which I own both) offer at least 3 sections of the image to measure: at the top of the screen, in the middle and at the bottom of the screen. For an LCD, the top position will always measure the quickest while the bottom will always measure the slowest. Most publications I see either list just the middle reading or take an average of all three (which should be nearly identical to the middle reading). The argument for using this middle reading is this is where your eyes are focused in most games (example: the reticle in an FPS). However, it's important to point out that even the fastest LCDs will not post a bottom reading of less than 16ms for a 60Hz source. Why?

1 second / 60 (frames) = 0.01667 seconds OR 16.67ms

Incidentally, this works the same for 120Hz as well as 240Hz: 1 second / 120 = 8.333ms; 1 second / 240 = 4.167ms.

Unlike LCD, DLP doesn't draw it's image in this way. Instead it 'flashes' the entire image all at once from a frame buffer. Therefore it doesn’t matter what position you measure on the screen as all three positions will always give the same exact result. In this case, a measurement of 16.67ms would be the absolute quickest result you could measure for a 60Hz source. It's this way that DLP produces it's image that gives it an advantage when it comes to motion handling. LCDs use something called sample and hold for producing motion. In the absence of a black frame or creative frame insertion feature, LCD holds it's image on screen until the next image is drawn. In the case of a 60Hz source this means the image lingers for the full 16.67ms. This wreaks havoc with how our eyes track motion and we perceive this as blur. While DLP is not impervious to motion artifacts (rainbow effect being the most egregious example), in general, DLP performs more similarly to flicker or 'impulse' type displays like plasma or CRT than it does sample and hold display types like LCD and OLED-- motion is rendered with less blur.

Detour over. Back to your regularly scheduled review.



GAMING EXPERIENCE

My reference material for any gaming display is the criminally overlooked Titanfall 2. On the PS4 Pro/PS5 the game runs like a dream in full fat 4K at a rock solid 60fps. Here the TK700STi gives the cult favorite an extra sense of scale as you zip around, wall running and slide hopping through the maps at break neck speeds. Switching over to the PC and 1080p/240Hz I did miss the jaw dropping 4K visuals but quickly remembered why pro players typically sacrifice resolution for higher frame rates. At 240Hz, the TK700STi renders motion with a clarity that is simply awe inspiring. BenQ claims an input latency of only 4ms at 240Hz-- I won't argue as movement felt almost telepathic.

But that's not to say the TK700STi can't excel at more casual endeavors as well. The sheer detail available when navigating game environments on a large format, full resolution 4K display cannot be overstated. Swinging across the New York skyline in the PS5 release of Spider-Man Miles Morales on my 100" screen feels almost surreal. Perching myself on the edge of a sky scraper and panning the camera down towards the street actually triggered my fear of heights-- something that never happened to me in the original game. The immersive nature of front projection works as well for games as it does for movies-- arguably more so considering the interactive nature of games. This is my current favorite way to get lost in my game of choice. No TV or monitor, not even my ultrawide screen gaming monitor, offers the same level of thrills.


FINAL THOUGHTS

The ability to finally experience 4K/60Hz games with virtually no input lag is something gamers have asked for since 4K projectors first started hitting the market. This is, hands down, my favorite way to experience games on the next generation consoles. The addition of a short throw lens, high brightness design, compact form factor and AndroidTV, even absent Netflix support, also makes this TK700STi a really compelling argument for a TV replacement.

The TK700STi isn't perfect, I would have really liked to see some lens shift to make installation easier. And it's color/contrast performance, while on par with it's 4K DLP competition, isn't going to set the world on fire. Ultimately, if you're a gamer with a light controlled theater you're probably still waiting for a low latency model with wide color support and better contrast/black levels. But if you're in need of a home entertainment projector that can stand up to ambient light and perform just as well on game day as movie night: the T700STi would get my very enthusiastic recommendation!


Revised 5/27/2021. Greatly expanded performance and calibration section based on new tools. Full calibration report included. Updated review bullet points to better reflect the TK700STi's place in the market.

Revised 5/13/2021. Added information about the QS01 update to bring Bluetooth audio connectivity to the device. Clarified the HDR picture controls section. Corrected several grammatical and typographical errors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
FAQ:

Q: My picture looks washed out in Game Mode.

A: Once in the Game picture mode, the TK700STi gains access to three additional picture sub-modes that modify the image in specific ways. Those modes are FPS (first person shooter), SPG (sports game), and RPG (role playing game). By default, the ‘FPS’ preset is selected. FPS intentionally reduces gamma to exaggerate dark level detail. This is so it’s easy to pick out opponents that might be hiding in shadows. The result is a washed out image with grey blacks. Simply select a different game preset like SPG or RPG to eliminate this effect.

CALIBRATION SETTINGS:

Reminder: you should NOT copy setting as unit to unit variance means these settings are just as likely to harm than they are to help. I'm posting the settings I've employed for reference. Brightness is still over 100 nits and contrast sits at 1176 dynamic.

TK700STi

Picture mode: Cinema
Contrast: default
Brightness: default
Brilliant Color: 4

Advanced Color Settings
Gamma: 2.2
Color Temperature
red gain 97
green gain 96
blue gain 99
red offset 251
green offset 256
blue offset 250

Color Management (Hue, Saturation, Gain)
red 178 200 200
green 170 192 200
blue 218 199 200
cyan 168 178 200
magenta 190 197 200
yellow 200 186 200

Light Source: SmartECO
 

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Great review! No native 24p alone would be a deal-breaker for me personally (I can definitely see the difference between that and 3:2 pulldown).
But nice to see that Benq has come up with a good 4K alternative for the more serious gamers. ;)
To make me want to upgrade, they would have to give me a W2700/HT3550 upgraded with this new DLP chip and a low-lag Gaming Mode, though. But will they ever release an all-in-one package? Time will tell...
 

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Thanks for the great review! I just received my TK700 yesterday and got it mounted last night. For the most part I am really happy. Black levels leave much to be desired but I am coming from a 2150st so I wasn't really expecting them to be better.

I am really limited with my projector selection with the layout of my room. I need to stick with a projector that can throw 110" in less then 9ft. I would go with a higher end EPSON or JVC but don't want my projector hanging down so low I can't walk under it. With 4 kids on the younger side that is just asking for a problem.

I am still using an Elite Screen Sable frame with CineWhite material. Would a different screen or material make more sense for this projector? The room is mostly light controlled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great review! No native 24p alone would be a deal-breaker for me personally (I can definitely see the difference between that and 3:2 pulldown).
But nice to see that Benq has come up with a good 4K alternative for the more serious gamers. ;)
To make me want to upgrade, they would have to give me a W2700/HT3550 upgraded with this new DLP chip and a low-lag Gaming Mode, though. But will they ever release an all-in-one package? Time will tell...
... Hang in there. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the great review! I just received my TK700 yesterday and got it mounted last night. For the most part I am really happy. Black levels leave much to be desired but I am coming from a 2150st so I wasn't really expecting them to be better.

I am really limited with my projector selection with the layout of my room. I need to stick with a projector that can throw 110" in less then 9ft. I would go with a higher end EPSON or JVC but don't want my projector hanging down so low I can't walk under it. With 4 kids on the younger side that is just asking for a problem.

I am still using an Elite Screen Sable frame with CineWhite material. Would a different screen or material make more sense for this projector? The room is mostly light controlled.
I’m a big advocate for white screens in light controlled rooms but there are plenty of advocates for gray screens here on the forum.

The first thing I’d recommend, if you haven’t already, is to engage SmartEco. Unlike previous BenQ projectors I’ve tested the TK700STi can actually achieve a darker shade of black in smart eco below what is possibly in the standard eco setting.

I’ll post my setting for the TK700STi tonight. I don’t recommend straight copying setting due to unit to unit variation but it might give you a good starting point.
 

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I’m a big advocate for white screens in light controlled rooms but there are plenty of advocates for gray screens here on the forum.

The first thing I’d recommend, if you haven’t already, is to engage SmartEco. Unlike previous BenQ projectors I’ve tested the TK700STi can actually achieve a darker shade of black in smart eco below what is possibly in the standard eco setting.

I’ll post my setting for the TK700STi tonight. I don’t recommend straight copying setting due to unit to unit variation but it might give you a good starting point.

Thank you! Right after reading your review I sent and switched from ECO to Smart ECO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This should be called a "Short-ish Throw". I would literally have to have it sitting on my lap to work...
(forever stuck with my wst1080 i guess...)
I’d still consider this a true short throw as anything with a throw ratio of less than 1.0 Is technically ‘short’ but you point is taken. This is NOT as short throw as the old TH671ST or Optoma’s GT1080. Still, it’s a big improvement over the TK850 and UHD51 which both needed over 8 and 9 ft respectively. You could actually use this on a coffee table in the right room. My Ht3550 (same throw as the Tk850) is actually mounted at the back of my room projecting over my head.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Now that’s what I call a real, substantive review. Awesome work @sage11x.
Thank you. I have this feeling like I forgot something but I double checked my outline and I covered it all. Please let me know if there is something I forgot.
 
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Great review! This answered just about every question I had except for one thing. Does the input lag differ in the game mode vs game mode with HDR or is it the same in both? Or did I miss that?

Thanks again, I hope to order soon!
 

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Thanks for the great review.The projector seems perfect for my needs. I'll hold off placing my order until the 3D issues have been fixed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Great review! This answered just about every question I had except for one thing. Does the input lag differ in the game mode vs game mode with HDR or is it the same in both? Or did I miss that?

Thanks again, I hope to order soon!
No you didn’t miss anything. I was able to test for 1080p and 4K in the standard game mode but I don’t have the ability to test for HDR input lag. Sorry.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Great review, no 3D means a no for me. I'll be sticking with Epson it seems.
Keep an eye out. I’m not a big fan of 3D but I was looking forward to testing the TK700STi with 3D as bright DLPs typically make for some of the best 3D displays.

BenQ is still planning to add the feature in a future revision. We’ll just have to wait and see.
 
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Sage, do you know if the 3D will be 120 or 144Hz (guessing maybe nobody knows yet)?
Have any idea why it seems Benq has completely phased out the superior judder-free 144Hz 3D technology? The W1070 did it many years ago and it should be possible to implement in today's tech, so why? Only Benq themselves know probably, but maybe you have some idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Sage, do you know if the 3D will be 120 or 144Hz (guessing maybe nobody knows yet)?
Have any idea why it seems Benq has completely phased out the superior judder-free 144Hz 3D technology? The W1070 did it many years ago and it should be possible to implement in today's tech, so why? Only Benq themselves know probably, but maybe you have some idea.

I am a complete nub when it comes to 3D. I know just enough to be dangerous. Wasn’t the Ht2050 capable of 144Hz?

I don’t think we’ll have an answer until TI rolls out the firmware update.
 
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Hehe! The HT2050 and most (or all) other post-W1070 1080p enthusiast level Benq projectors have had 144Hz 3D. But for some reason the 4K pixel shifters do not, even though it should have been just as feasible to implement in them. The 3D is done at 1080p anyways, so...

144Hz is pretty much the native 24p of 3D, so I would not hold my breath for this one to get it when the other ones that do native 24p don't.

But as you wrote about 3:2 pulldown...most people don't really notice the judder and won't complain. A bit bad for us videophiles that do though... When it in the end probably is an easy thing to change for those who write the firmwares.

Sorry for deviating a bit away from the main topic of the thread :p
 
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