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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Looking at mounting a projector in the bedroom from a recessed shelf behind the bed. Ceiling is 2.7m High and projector drop is 600mm from the ceiling.

The throw is 2.4-2.6m and I've bought it down to 2 projectors which fit the budget (both on special at the moment)

BenQ W1110 vs Epson TW-5600. Not bothered too much by the difference of the projected screen size of the two.

When I run the numbers through their respective throw calculators I get two very different results and was wondering those with similar or the same models would care to comment.

Images shows both calculations side-by-side.

The issue I'm finding is the distance from the ceiling to the top of the projected image.

The BenQ shows a drop of 660mm (which is ideal for me) whereas the Epson shows a drop of only 130mm. As you can see from the Benny calculator, the top of the image projects straight whilst the Epson projects top and bottom at an angle?

My questions are (based on ceiling installation), Is this all by design, do BenQ projectors shoot a straight top projection? do Epsons shoot an angled projection? are the calculators correct?
 

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I believe the US equivalents are the Epson HC2100 and the BenQ HT2050 models.

The BenQ and Epson must be mounted upside down. The BenQ should have the top of the image about 2-5 inches (adjustable) below the center of the lens.

The Epson 2100 has some discussion in that thread about the lens shift, but it has a similar range of a few inches, but the Epson appears to run the top of the image a few inches above the center of the lens to a couple of inches below the center of the lens. So, the image generally will be higher on the wall.

Once again, both projectors must be upside down on your shelf, which will hide all of the controls and adjustments that are there. Also, all measurements will be to the center of the lens, not the top or bottom of the projector, so if your shelf is 600mm from the ceiling, the center of the lens may be more like 550mm or 500mm from the ceiling. The top of the image then may be 600mm to 700mm from the ceiling with the BenQ, and only about 400mm to 600mm with the Epson.

That's all to the top of the image on your wall.

This calculator is much more visual, and contains both projectors you are looking at (use the US model numbers I gave you). It offers metric calculations and will show very exact placement options and placement flexibility for the screen.
http://www.reviewtranslations.com/projection_calculator_en.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I believe the US equivalents are the Epson HC2100 and the BenQ HT2050 models.

The BenQ and Epson must be mounted upside down. The BenQ should have the top of the image about 2-5 inches (adjustable) below the center of the lens.

The Epson 2100 has some discussion in that thread about the lens shift, but it has a similar range of a few inches, but the Epson appears to run the top of the image a few inches above the center of the lens to a couple of inches below the center of the lens. So, the image generally will be higher on the wall.

Once again, both projectors must be upside down on your shelf, which will hide all of the controls and adjustments that are there. Also, all measurements will be to the center of the lens, not the top or bottom of the projector, so if your shelf is 600mm from the ceiling, the center of the lens may be more like 550mm or 500mm from the ceiling. The top of the image then may be 600mm to 700mm from the ceiling with the BenQ, and only about 400mm to 600mm with the Epson.

That's all to the top of the image on your wall.

This calculator is much more visual, and contains both projectors you are looking at (use the US model numbers I gave you). It offers metric calculations and will show very exact placement options and placement flexibility for the screen.
Thanks for the replies, yes the projector will be mounted underneath the shelf as the whole shelf itself is recessed into the wall with multiple shelves. Plenty of room within the shelves and the projector will be protruding so there is adequate airflow.

Thanks for the help, the calculator plus your advise puts the epson ontop for me. Fits the budget, meets requirements for the bedroom.

Thanks for your help, I'll post some pics once I've mounted and up and running!

Thanks,
Vic
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hey All,

As promised, pictures of the setup!

Pictures aren't the greatest or straightest. 100" at just under 3m. Will add some more when I'm not enjoying the projector!

Source is MGS V TPP on a PS4 at 1080p. Will take a few more of some darker scenes.

Picture looks great even though we have a bit of light leaking through the side of the blinds.

Thoughts on the Epson;
* Easy to setup, the lens shift works a treat as I've mounted it.
* A bit loud even when on ECO mode. But after a while and with movie/game volume you tend to not notice it as much unless there is a quiet scene.
* Heat is not an issue (not summer yet so we'll wait and see).
* Haven't had a chance to really play with the image settings but from out of the box I adjusted the contrast and brightness to suit and the image is fantastic!
* Depending on the shot, most dark scenes in movies are very good and blacks, although not perfect, are still good and watchable without your brain thinking the image looks washed out. Although, when playing games it really depends on the game and how the developer treats dark/black scenes.
** Playing MGS V, during night missions or entering dark places, the game slightly brightens the scene so that blacks are almost metallic like and reflect other surfaces.
** But when playing Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon, I found that night missions are almost un-playable without enabling night vision within the game.
** Same thing applied to Nioh, dark scenes, although playable, get a little annoying due to how deep the blacks are in the level design and finding yourself almost squinting to really concentrate.
** But on the other hand, playing Deus Ex Mankind Divided, dark scenes are completely fine.
** Driveclub looks fantastic, car details really shine and the colours during race scenes pop out.

(I believe that although the projector is currently throwing to a standard painted wall, if I were to put up a screen or paint the wall with that "projector black paint" I would get a much better picture during dark scenes.)
* The Epson has passthrough bluetooth audio. I tried to connect it to my Bose Soundtouch but it just keeps saying "Failed to connect to bluetooth device" the Bose is not the issue as I've connected multiple devices to it via bluetooth. I'll have to try with a different bluetooth speaker to troubleshoot further.
* Text across every game and in movie subtitles are fine and crisp without any shadowing or aliasing.

Although it's only been 4 days I can say I'm very happy with the Epson, I still would like to see the Benny in action but doubt it would alter or make me regret my decision. This is a bedroom projector, which means I'm not as fussy as I would be if I were setting up a cinema room I would most definitely be more inclined to testing multiple projectors to get the "best" possible image.
I've seen DLP and 3LCD side-by-side before, to me DLP is smoother whilst 3LCD is sharper. 3LCD is sharper whilst blacks are slightly deeper in DLP.

Any questions, fire away.
 

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... I've seen DLP and 3LCD side-by-side before, to me DLP is smoother whilst 3LCD is sharper. ...
That's the opposite of what most believe. Almost every comparison of DLP and 3LCD rates sharpness as an advantage for DLP because it's a single chip vs. three separate LCD panels that are never in perfect aligment. It's possible that you are perceiving another quality in the two projectors you compared as sharpness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's the opposite of what most believe. Almost every comparison of DLP and 3LCD rates sharpness as an advantage for DLP because it's a single chip vs. three separate LCD panels that are never in perfect aligment. It's possible that you are perceiving another quality in the two projectors you compared as sharpness.
Could well be. Although at least to my eyes the Epson felt more crisp. Whether that's related sharpness or not is debatable.
 

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Could well be. Although at least to my eyes the Epson felt more crisp. Whether that's related sharpness or not is debatable.
What you're most likely seeing is screen door effect. :)


3LCD projectors like the Epson have the largest pixel gaps (the least pixel fill) of the three types of projection tech. (LCoS being the best, DLP being second). This results in a more clearly defined pixel grid. I've had more than one person comment that they like this! :eek: To each their own I guess. :p Personally, I perceive this visible pixel grid as being the opposite of sharp. Single chip DLP looks very sharp to my eyes. LCoS has a bit more 'film like' quality that I really like for movies but less for video games.


It's one of the reasons Epson's 'enhanced resolution' models are such an upgrade over their vanilla 1080P 3LCD units-- the 'wobulated' pixels help to fill those gaps.
 
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