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I live in Laurel, MD in a community that does not allow the huge antennas on roofs. I have the RCA DTC-100 and am tired of only getting HBO in Hi Def. I want to install an antenna and get the local digitals from both DC and Baltimore (I'm located exactly between the two cities - 15 miles each way). Is there an antenna that I could install in my attic that would do the trick? Please include all of the parts I might need (amplifier, rotor, etc.)
 

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Todd,


Your consideration for you neighbors is admirable (certain suburban-dwelling Americans seem unique in the world in being offended by what their neighbors put on their roofs).


But FYI, if your attic attempts result in failure, note that Federal Law says your community can't prevent you from installing a TV antenna, in most cases. See the link below for more information.


Testing has shown that indoor antennas receive a signal about 10-20 times less than that of similar antennas installed on a roof; keep that in mind. A preamp may be needed. Others who have gone the attic route should be able to give you more tips.


If the attic mount doesn't work and you don't have any big terrain issues, a 4-bay UHF bowtie antenna is pretty unobtrusive.


------------------

You have a right to install OTA and dish antennas on property under your control.


See http://www.fcc.gov/csb/facts/otard.html
 

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As Barry pointed out, you shouldn't feel forced to have an indoor only antenna. However, in your situation, an attic antenna may suffice. (you are so close to the transmitters.)


Keep the material factors in mind. I you have a stucco building (my problem), the wire lathe used by the stucco acts as a Faraday cage and kills off most of the signal. If you have aluminum siding, you'll get almost zero signal. If it just wood, you'll still lose lots of signal but you might be just fine.


In your sitation, you might be able to use a single antenna that recieves signals from both the front and back. Point the antenna in the direction of the weaker signals. If that doesn't work, you might want to use two different antennas pointing in the direction of the two different sources and join the antennas. Read the threads on antenna joining.
 

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Hello Todd,


I went through the same dilemma you did about 6 months ago. Everybody told me I had to get an outside antenna but I didn't want to do that because I didn't want to. My hd towers are about 35 miles away over level terrain and the $35 silver sensor antenna picks up all 4 of my local hd stations and radio shack has a vu-160 that picks up all the hd plus all the ntsc ota stations. Both are able to do this from inside my attic. These are highly directional however, they must be pointed exactly in the right direction. I have heard of people in your situation buying two silver sensors and pointing one at each target city then joining them with a radio shack diplexor to get all the stations coming in to them on one cable.


good luck,

Paul
 

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Quote:
Testing has shown that indoor antennas receive a signal about 10-20 times less than that of similar antennas installed on a roof; keep that in mind.
But there's lots of exceptions, like me - my receptions is much much better with an attic mount, probably due to multipath and marginal LOS to the trasmitters. Anyhow, I recommend the Channel Master 3021 because it is a great antenna, and its shape and size makes it very easy to work with in the tight-confines of most attics. You can see a picture of one in action on this thread: How to Tilt a UHF Antenna .


Dave
 

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Todd


I live in Dallas and am about 30 miles from the transmitting towers and am currently using a Channelmaster 3021 in my attic and get great reception on all the UHF DT and analog stations here. I am also using a VHF antenna to receive normal VHF analog stations as well as the one VHF DT station here. If all your stations are UHF - channel 14 or higher, I would recommend the 3021 and the channelmaster rotor with remote control. Once set, you key in the coordinates and the rotor turns to that location. Like mentioned above, a composite roof rather than metal helps and keep it as high as possible and away from air-conditioning ducts and other electrical wires.


Also check out this site and it will give you the distance and bearing to your stations.
http://www.bsexton.com/tvdb.html


Stark Electronic has the antennas and rotators for sale http://www.starkelectronic.com


The nice thing about the 3021 is it does not take up much space and is easy to place and rotate due to its small size.


Hope this helps

warren
 
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