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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
I think the Emotiva C2+ and the Monoprice 365 will both be worthwhile upgrades to the 2 way Klipsch center channel in terms of sound quality. I would definitely order both and demo. My only concern with the C2+ despite its VERY impressive specs for the price would be the rising treble response all the Emotiva speakers seem to have. I think the Monoprice will be a bit more neutral based on what I've seen.

So yeah, order both and keep the one you like. I still think the RC263 at regular price is a worthy contender. Knowing it goes on sale makes it a tough pill to swallow.
Thanks a lot!

I saw the RC263 online (in Dec I guess or maybe very end of Nov) before I knew anything about it (not sure if it was still on sale for the ridiculously low price (left out) for another a day more, or so, at the time, or whether it was already back to normal MSRP. Speaking of Infinity centers, someone sold a Intermezzo 3.5c center recently on auction. I personally did not like the finish of that one; there was one with a nicer finish - very light-colored - but the color is far too light for my setup; most importantly there are not enough professional reviews about it.
Speaking of deals, there was a limited time small discount on the THX-365C yesterday from Monoprice on eBay (before I even posted this thread). Just for the benefit of anyone else considering it.
Edit - I removed any actual sale / street prices myself after reading forum description / rule to the right....
 

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Discussion Starter #22 (Edited)
I missed a few THX-365C reviews in my OP yesterday:
Aside from the 3 reviews I posted in my OP from owners who loved the THX-365C vs. their more expensive well known / popular center speakers, there were two more reviews I missed.

One (4th review) is from an owner who replaced his ...... center speaker with the THX-365C. I am not posting the model or the review itself because it is just one owner's opinion and could be off base regarding the reason he ended up keeping the Monolith instead of his prior center.
More importantly I appreciate the feedback of those here who recommended that center speaker in this thread. The point is simply that it to me is one more owner who loves the THX-365C after having used a very highly regarded more expensive one, so to me that just shows the Monolith center is competitive.
Speaker preference is always subjective anyway; otherwise there would likely be far less center speakers - a few per price range...

I also appreciated the 'official' review here - Monoprice Monolith THX Certified HT Speakers w/Atmos... - and on another big AV site.

There was also a 5th review of the THX-365C:
"Nice speaker. I inserted this in my HT between two PSB Stratus speakers after I discovered something was wrong with my old PSB Stratus center. The Monoprice 365C blends in well acoustically to my high quality speaker system, providing loud and clear sound. I had originally worried that mixing speaker brands would be a problem in terms of sounding different, but it was no problem at all. Sounds as good or better than the $1,000 center speaker it replaced. The matte black finish is good for staying out of sight below my projector screen. "

The C2+ should be a good competitor. It is highly regarded as well and, as noted, is more sensitive and has the extra midrange driver.
I think based on your comments, between these 2 options, I am confident that I will find one I love.

A heartfelt thanks again for all the suggestions and recommendations here; those, combined with owner reviews and reviews on AV sites, have given me a solid perspective on what to look for, some options and a potential game plan.
 

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Thanks! The Ultra was also on my short list albeit pricier than the two $400 speakers I have been potentially.
Impressive that SVS have free return shipping.
The free return shipping is built into the price of their speakers, so you pay for it even if you don't return them...
 

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Some other very good centres to consider:
Paradigm Premier 600C
Wharfedale EVO4.C
PSA MTM-210C
What are your current speakers and subs?
 
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+1 for the Monoprice. I have one. During movies I do not look at the speaker. Action scenes with Atmos and with all the other surround speakers doing bullets and bombs, you just sit back and enjoy. During dialogue in Romance movies, you can weep a tear or just feel good at the ending you already knew before you started. I believe there are no bad center speakers over the $200 price point. I bought the Monoprice because I live 20 minutes away and can get a will-call. You have the upgrade itch bad. Your current speaker is fine. Can you do better? Maybe in that one in a hundred movie which use the surrounds for music with the vocals coming from the center speaker, and we are talking marginally better here. Other than that I want a Christmas card for next year for saving you some money.
 

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Some other very good centres to consider:
Paradigm Premier 600C
Wharfedale EVO4.C
PSA MTM-210C
What are your current speakers and subs?
Tell me more about the Paradigm Premier 500c & 600c (the other 2 are too tall for my application) recommendation, I noticed that you have some experience with the brand.
 

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The difference between the two is the 600C uses a pair of passive radiators to increase output. They are both 3-way WT/MW designs, and have fairly flat frequency response if that matters a lot to you.
It seems to me that Paradigm and Klipsch put the most effort into centre speakers than the vast majority of other companies. The only way to tell if it's a better centre than the 440C is to audition it in your home, in your room, with your electronics and sources material. IMHO, whill there may be a bit more "fullness" to the sound sue to the larger woofers, clarity MIGHT be improved a bit, but you probably won't be improving on the dynamics of the Klipsch.
Again, what are your mains, sub, AVR, speaker settings, crossovers, subs, etc? Knowing this info can help us make better recommendations. You wanted a CLEARLY better centre; well, you will have to go bigger to get "better". If Klipsch, the RP-600C, RP-504C, or RC-64iii (in increasing order) are the "better" centres. To increase performance further, you would probably have to go to a completely different configuration (Ascend Acoustics Sierra Horizon with RAAL), speakers in a higher class than your current ones (Paradigm Prestige, Revel, Kef R-series, etc), or Pro Audio-derived speakers like the MTM-210C or JTR Noesis monsters.
 
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Discussion Starter #28
Some other very good centres to consider:
Paradigm Premier 600C
Wharfedale EVO4.C
PSA MTM-210C
What are your current speakers and subs?

Thanks a lot for all the helpful feedback and recommendations!

Here is my current setup (current front speakers and sub in bold):
  • Sony XBR77-A9G 77" OLED TV
  • Sherwood Trinnov R-972 7.1 receiver
  • Sony UBP-X800M2 4K Blu Ray SACD / DVD - Audio player (upgraded from X700 to X800M2). Own two now.
  • Infinity 'Overture 2' - front speakers
  • Advent Laureate - surround speakers
  • Martin Logan Dynamo 500 sub
  • Klipsch RP-440C center channel speaker (used a Paradigm LCR450 before, which I still own)
  • Advent Legacy speakers (not hooked up)
  • HK DC520 dual Dolby HX Pro cassette deck - never use
  • Sony 400 disc DVD changer - almost never use these days
  • Technics Mash 110+1 CD changer - hardly use these days.
  • Pioneer SACD / DVD-Audio player
  • (Extra pair of Mordaunt Short speakers - not used)
 

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Ordinarily I would suggest the Infinity Reference RC263 - especially when on sale - as it would probably be the closest match to your mains. Unfortunately, your "sub" isn't really a "dynamo". You are likely getting the same bass extension as your towers from it.
Maybe your issue is a sound mis-match between your fronts and centre. Some people don't notice any difference, while others find it quite distracting. The ability to level-match the SPL output at the MLP is one thing that AVRs do extremely well. Until now, I had never heard of a Sherwood AVR with Trinnov processing. Perhaps a more modern AVR, even one off of Craiglist, will help make a difference. You could certainly purchase one to test it out and return it if not happy.
Another thing to think about is a "proper" subwoofer. As I said above, the ML one is not likely doing anything in your room. I suggest a high-output, ported 12" sub from (in ascending order) SVS, Monoprice, Hsu, Rythmik, or Outlaw. The ability to play clean, flat, accurate bass from the crossover frequency (usually 80Hz for bass management and 120Hz for LFE) to below 20Hz is literally eye-opening. This will allow your speakers to play louder and with more clarity without the need to play the deep notes.
 

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... I can't help noticing that the C2+ has dual rear ports and a much bigger enclosure---as a result I'd expect it to offer more headroom, dynamics, and mid-bass extension than the 365C's sealed cabinet. The specs (assuming they are legit) bear that out: the C2+ is 3db more sensitive (92db vs 89db) and its 3db roll off is 20Hz lower (45Hz vs 65Hz). ...
I think sealed centers get underestimated, especially when they're properly designed to crossover to a sub at 80 Hz. I think James Larson at Audioholics did a good job of explaining this in the quotes below from his review of the Monoprice Monolith THX-365C sealed center that's certified by THX to be capable of achieving THX Reference level loudness (85 dB continuous with 105 dB peaks) at a distance of 12 feet within a 3,000 cubic foot room.

Sealed designs are preferred by THX (although not required) in order to achieve the 12dB/octave slope needed for a THX speaker/subwoofer crossover, because a sealed design has a natural 12dB/octave slope low-end rolloff that is much more difficult to achieve in a ported design, and a sealed design has a much more predictable phase response. Given that THX specifies an 80 Hz crossover, I wouldn’t expect the Monolith THX speakers to have very much bass output below that point. These speakers are intended to be used with subwoofers, and I would expect the low-end rolloff to occur around 80 Hz.

The Monolith THX speakers were not lacking in dynamic range either; crescendos hit with a palpable force and weight. That is no surprise given the THX Ultra certification and oversized three-way bookshelf speaker design. Another aspect of their design that really helps here is they do not try to tackle lower bass frequencies, and that allows the design of the bass drivers to attack midbass bands that much more competently. To be honest, I wish more bookshelf speakers would forego chasing after bass below 80 Hz, as these do, since most users will have subwoofers anyway.

Another disadvantage might be their lack of low bass output. However, their low-end response is a deliberate design goal of these speakers, and they would not work as well otherwise. Besides that, if they did have a deeper bass response, that would lower their sensitivity which is not a trade-off worth making for high dynamic range speakers that are intended to be used with subs. So again, this isn’t a criticism so much as it is a notice for those who are looking to their speakers to handle full-range sound: these are not the speakers for that application.
 

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I think sealed centers get underestimated, especially when they're properly designed to crossover to a sub at 80 Hz. I think James Larson at Audioholics did a good job of explaining this in the quotes below from his review of the Monoprice Monolith THX-365C sealed center that's certified by THX to be capable of achieving THX Reference level loudness (85 dB continuous with 105 dB peaks) at a distance of 12 feet within a 3,000 cubic foot room.

Sealed designs are preferred by THX (although not required) in order to achieve the 12dB/octave slope needed for a THX speaker/subwoofer crossover, because a sealed design has a natural 12dB/octave slope low-end rolloff that is much more difficult to achieve in a ported design, and a sealed design has a much more predictable phase response. Given that THX specifies an 80 Hz crossover, I wouldn’t expect the Monolith THX speakers to have very much bass output below that point. These speakers are intended to be used with subwoofers, and I would expect the low-end rolloff to occur around 80 Hz.

The Monolith THX speakers were not lacking in dynamic range either; crescendos hit with a palpable force and weight. That is no surprise given the THX Ultra certification and oversized three-way bookshelf speaker design. Another aspect of their design that really helps here is they do not try to tackle lower bass frequencies, and that allows the design of the bass drivers to attack midbass bands that much more competently. To be honest, I wish more bookshelf speakers would forego chasing after bass below 80 Hz, as these do, since most users will have subwoofers anyway.

Another disadvantage might be their lack of low bass output. However, their low-end response is a deliberate design goal of these speakers, and they would not work as well otherwise. Besides that, if they did have a deeper bass response, that would lower their sensitivity which is not a trade-off worth making for high dynamic range speakers that are intended to be used with subs. So again, this isn’t a criticism so much as it is a notice for those who are looking to their speakers to handle full-range sound: these are not the speakers for that application.
Interesting. Looks like the biggest advantage according to that article is that a sealed speaker is easier to integrate with a subwoofer. Wonder how that actually translates in real life usage?
It also claims that the lack of mid-bass extension allows for higher sensitivity, but the C2+ is still 3db more sensitive...so I guess the "higher sensitivity" would be only in comparison with the exact same sealed speaker that has more mid-bass extension?

I get the feeling that the Audioholics reviewer is really looking for reasons to praise the Monolith speakers as much as possible.

I was tickled by this seeming bit of candor, followed immediately by more wooly excuse-making:
Monoprice is banking on the THX-certification to add consumer appeal to these products. But, what does THX-certification really mean? The trouble here is that THX closely guards the exact performance characteristics needed to attain certification, but we do have some general guidelines that need to be followed for speaker manufacturers.
THX certification as I understand it mainly means paying THX a buttload of money to get "certified." My lousy old Logitech x2200 computer speakers were "THX certified" and they sounded like crap, lol.
 

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The way I look at it THX certification isn't any less reliable than speaker company specs or amateur opinions on AV forums. :) Anyway there's nothing complicated about 85 dB continuous with 105 dB peaks at a distance of 12 feet within a 3,000 cubic foot room that couldn't be verified by an independent source with the proper measuring equipment, same as verifying sensitivity or other published specs.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
The difference between the two is the 600C uses a pair of passive radiators to increase output. They are both 3-way WT/MW designs, and have fairly flat frequency response if that matters a lot to you.
It seems to me that Paradigm and Klipsch put the most effort into centre speakers than the vast majority of other companies. The only way to tell if it's a better centre than the 440C is to audition it in your home, in your room, with your electronics and sources material. IMHO, whill there may be a bit more "fullness" to the sound sue to the larger woofers, clarity MIGHT be improved a bit, but you probably won't be improving on the dynamics of the Klipsch.
Again, what are your mains, sub, AVR, speaker settings, crossovers, subs, etc? Knowing this info can help us make better recommendations. You wanted a CLEARLY better centre; well, you will have to go bigger to get "better". If Klipsch, the RP-600C, RP-504C, or RC-64iii (in increasing order) are the "better" centres. To increase performance further, you would probably have to go to a completely different configuration (Ascend Acoustics Sierra Horizon with RAAL), speakers in a higher class than your current ones (Paradigm Prestige, Revel, Kef R-series, etc), or Pro Audio-derived speakers like the MTM-210C or JTR Noesis monsters.
Thanks! (I see someone asked a question, but your reply was helpful to me as well- the OP).
Ordinarily I would suggest the Infinity Reference RC263 - especially when on sale - as it would probably be the closest match to your mains. Unfortunately, your "sub" isn't really a "dynamo". You are likely getting the same bass extension as your towers from it.
Maybe your issue is a sound mis-match between your fronts and centre. Some people don't notice any difference, while others find it quite distracting. The ability to level-match the SPL output at the MLP is one thing that AVRs do extremely well. Until now, I had never heard of a Sherwood AVR with Trinnov processing. Perhaps a more modern AVR, even one off of Craiglist, will help make a difference. You could certainly purchase one to test it out and return it if not happy.
Another thing to think about is a "proper" subwoofer. As I said above, the ML one is not likely doing anything in your room. I suggest a high-output, ported 12" sub from (in ascending order) SVS, Monoprice, Hsu, Rythmik, or Outlaw. The ability to play clean, flat, accurate bass from the crossover frequency (usually 80Hz for bass management and 120Hz for LFE) to below 20Hz is literally eye-opening. This will allow your speakers to play louder and with more clarity without the need to play the deep notes.
Thanks for the feedback!
While the built in subs on my front towers are very nice and the ML is not the loudest / largest sub by any stretch of the imagination, I can assure you the ML sub is definitely helping a lot with the overall experience. I prefer it to my prior 15" sub which died on me (amp failed, but I still have it).
I auditioned the ML first since the woofer driver is "only" 10" and I wanted to be sure it met my needs. I was very happy during the audition and was not disappointed when I hooked it up at home to say the least. Low frequency effect (including explosions) in sound tracks are more than loud enough with no distortion and literally rock the room, even though the HT is set up in a very large finished basement. Frankly anything larger / more powerful would be overkill for my needs and I already worry about my ears during loud scenes as it is. :)

Regarding a new center, I am not unhappy with my system at all. However, I just figured that now that I have my 77" OLED and Hi Res Audio / 4K Blu Ray player (which I use to pass 4K video to the TV via 2nd HDMI output on the BD player given receiver is not 4K capable) that I might want to explore a new center to see if I could benefit from a better center (e.g. ideally one with dual 6 1/2" woofers and 3-way design). The RP-440C woofers (while there are 4, are only 4") are the main 'downside' IMO.
That being said, my RP-440C is a very nice center and maybe I am expecting too much from a THX-365C or C2+ although at least one here said they expect it would be a noticeable upgrade. :)
If so I may hold off.

At least I am not too concerned about the potential new centers both being 4 Ohms, based on your comments and those of Zorba that it probably won't be an issue.
The unless you play it very loud caveat it there however. I hence readily admit that I am always careful to keep things within spec and would prefer not to have to even worry about any potential accidental amp damage - For instance I was scrolling surround sound modes for Hulu non-5.1 content this weekend and one mode was literally twice as loud as all the others. Luckily I was by the receiver and quickly turned the volume down by hand to avoid any damage. With a 4 amp center it might have been more scary than with my current RP-440C.
Also if I ever want to crank it up or if I even inadvertently do so (albeit unlikely), I do not want to have to worry... My system is currently worry-free. The Klipsch is easy to drive to very loud levels thanks no doubt due to its high sensitivity, being 8 Ohms and the heavy duty amp section in my receiver :)
(* It was a surround sound mode I never use but was using an optical output from TV to receiver to test HBO Max free trial that came with my Sony BD player - the Sony 800M2 does not have HBO Max app (not a concern since Netflix and Prime are my main concerns; Hulu is the other one; it is not supported by the BD player but I use the app on my TV for that).
I may bite the bullet on the C2+ or THX-365C and give it a shot anyway (despite the 4 Ohm impedance) and try to be more careful than usual even.

At the time I bought the R-972 AVR, it was based on build quality, performance and also to get HDMI, Dolby True HD, dts Master HD and was further convinced by the professional reviews which called out the "sought after Trinnov room correction system" (same as the one that came with the $13,000 professional system at the time). I also got a great deal on it, which I am still amazed by.

While I am considering a 9.2 receiver (not 7.2) for either now or later in the year, mostly to get 5.1.4 Atmos capability (e.g. Marantz SR6014, SR7013, Denon 4500H etc.), and while I am at it would get HDMI 2.x and eARC etc. of course, I am not necessarily in a rush for a new AVR - Aside from Atmos and dts X support, I have the features I need most (lack of eARC is not a huge deal to me yet). Also not sure how much Atmos will improve my system since I have no options for in-ceiling speakers in my large HT media area.
The R972 has been rock solid (reviews below) and I use my Sony UBP-X800M2 for 4K output to the TV. So aside from lack of Atmos and ARC/eARC, my AVR has what I want, especially sonically.
That being said I am checking deals for 9.2 receivers (going to jump over 7.2 straight to 9.2 so I can get 5.1.4 Atmos without an external amp).

In case it helps, below are some professional reviews of the R-972. These are admittedly from 2010, but aside from not having Atmos, dts X and HDMI 2.x [and 4K for which I have an easy workaround using the UBP-X800M2], it is an amazing AVR and I know that I would need to get a top of the line current AVR to give me the audio performance, build quality and effortless power.

Speaking of 9.2 receivers, since I am researching those too now: While I would ideally like a Marantz SR6014, SR7013, Denon X4500H or better, I wonder whether a 9.2 Atmos THX Select Onkyo NR-797 (someone has a nice deal on one and I could get one now rather than wait given all the recent spending) be a downgrade, purely speaking in terms of amplifier and overall sonic performance compared to my R-972 Trinnov?
I suspect I am probably better off waiting / getting one of the other 3 receivers noted above (or better of course) to avoid being disappointed...
Also heard about Onkyo reliability potentially not being what it once was unfortunately (my first quality receiver, before surround sound was an Integra TX-890 - 360W per channel at 2 Ohms. The good old days.
The 40+lbs Trinnov never feels strained or even gets hot thanks to the large heat sinks etc. My HTR before that was a 62 lb beast - Elite 47TX THX Ultra 2 (still have it - will sell it eventually after COVID concerns are out of the way) which I replaced with the R-972 to get HDMI, along with Dolby True HD and dts Master Audio etc.
So I do not want to take a step down in overall sound or build quality.

Wow, this became a novel!!! :)
Anyway, thanks again! Appreciate the feedback / insights / recommendations. Now to determine if this is a case of upgradeitis or not. ;)
 

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There's a lot to digest in that post, but it's pretty straightforward.
Heat doesn't build up instantly in an AVR, so you don't have to worry about damaging it or the speakers with a momentary volume burst. If you're watching action movies back-to-back at high (85bB) SPL then I would think about getting an AC Infinity cooler for the AVR - a less-expensive option that external amps.
Apparently the Denon X3700 is the better 9-channel AVR in their lineup, so keep that in mind. The X3600 measured "best" on ASR.
If you're happy with your sub, then there's no need to replace it. Just re-run your speaker setup when changing centres, as they all have different characteristics that affect the processing.
 
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Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
There's a lot to digest in that post, but it's pretty straightforward.
Heat doesn't build up instantly in an AVR, so you don't have to worry about damaging it or the speakers with a momentary volume burst. If you're watching action movies back-to-back at high (85bB) SPL then I would think about getting an AC Infinity cooler for the AVR - a less-expensive option that external amps.
Apparently the Denon X3700 is the better 9-channel AVR in their lineup, so keep that in mind. The X3600 measured "best" on ASR.
If you're happy with your sub, then there's no need to replace it. Just re-run your speaker setup when changing centres, as they all have different characteristics that affect the processing.
Thanks again!
Yes, I was planning to rerun the Trinnov Optimizer after any center replacement.

Speaking of receivers briefly (and then will close out my post with the original focus - a potential new center speaker):
I am hearing talk about Atmos being underwhelming / not being all it's cracked up to be and even then an apparent lack of content (although content wise I think there is a fair amount).
I will perhaps hold off on getting an Atmos (9.2 or 11.2) receiver; I was not in a hurry anyway as posted above. Add to that the fact that a number of R-972 owners tried newer receivers and preferred the natural sound / overall sound of the R-972 and some even sold the newer ones and went back to R-972 (was just reading the last page of the long R-972 thread here on avsforum).
Last but not least, I cannot add true height speakers in my HT room ceiling; height extension / up firing speakers may not replicate the actual ceiling speaker effect well enough from what I have hear / read).

Given the above and the fact that my original goal was whether to get a new center: For now, I will focus (primarily) on whether or not to get a new center (now) and, if yes, which one. Been spending a lot of time on reading up (which is good), but I will also focus on simply enjoying my system either way.
Note (for anyone else in the same boat): The cost of return shipping for some of the speakers I have been checking is easily $115+ for Ground shipping (varies greatly depending on location). Just something to keep in mind...
 

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Per the Audioholics measurements the THX-365C starts to roll off at 100 Hz, which IME does not yield my ideal 'fullness' around the crossover frequency and at lower volumes. For that reason I've personally gone with the C2+, even crossing with a subwoofer, and am much more satisfied.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Per the Audioholics measurements the THX-365C starts to roll off at 100 Hz, which IME does not yield my ideal 'fullness' around the crossover frequency and at lower volumes. For that reason I've personally gone with the C2+, even crossing with a subwoofer, and am much more satisfied.
Thanks for the feedback!
Which receiver / amp are you using to drive it? (Just asking given it is a 4 Ohm speaker...).
Which center speaker (if any) did you have before the C2+ and would you consider the C2+ a significant improvement over your prior center?
 

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Thanks for the feedback!
Which receiver / amp are you using to drive it? (Just asking given it is a 4 Ohm speaker...).
Which center speaker (if any) did you have before the C2+ and would you consider the C2+ a significant improvement over your prior center?
With respect to center channels I used the Def Tech ProCenter 1000/CLR-2002/CLR-3000 (monster center speaker...), Jamo C-10-CEN, and Infinity RC263 before being fully happy with the C2 (I don't have the '+' version). After all of those though there was some depth and 'naturalness' that was lacking, even with the 70-pound subwoofer-equipped CLR-3000, and that's what led me to keep looking.

I tried the RC-263 head-to-head with the C2 and was actually quite happy with that one too but the C2 has a slightly bigger and wider sound in my room. I feel that the deeper extension helps with integration and the C2 particularly sounded better/fuller to my ears at low volumes, so I kept it. Had I not had the C2 on-hand I likely would have kept the RC263 and been happy enough but no question that the C2 suits me better. The 263 really opens up at medium-to-high volumes and while doesn't extend as deep, it does offer great clarity.

With respect to driving them I used my Onkyo receivers for many years and just recently switched to an Outlaw 5000 fed by a Denon 4500X. I do feel it's an improvement but is undoubtedly wayyyyyyyyyy into the realm of diminishing returns, a total 'fun' upgrade that only happened because someone was selling the Outlaw locally for silly cheap. My Onkyo NR-656 pushed the C2, Revel F35s (6-ohm), and Jamo S809 surrounds just fine to quite loud volumes and isn't technically 4-ohm rated.

I'll also add that across the front I've used Def Tech ProCinema 800s, SM350s, SM450s, Jamo C93s, Jamo S803s, Elac UB5s, JBL Studio 530s, Revel M16s, and now my Revel F35s. I've also used Jamo S809s and JBL Arena 180s in my living room so feel like it's a good smattering of flavors. My ear definitely prefers neutral, if not slightly treble-leaning, speakers and has zero tolerance for mud and perceived missing detail.
 

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Per the Audioholics measurements the THX-365C starts to roll off at 100 Hz, which IME does not yield my ideal 'fullness' around the crossover frequency and at lower volumes. For that reason I've personally gone with the C2+, even crossing with a subwoofer, and am much more satisfied.
Per reference design for use with an 80 Hz crossover to sub the THX-365C, Infinity RC263, NHT C LCR and other well regarded sealed 3-way centers all start to roll off at 100 Hz at 12 db per octave. It may not suit all personal preferences with all setups in all environments but it's the way quality sealed 3-way centers are designed for optimum reference performance.
 

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Per reference design for use with an 80 Hz crossover to sub the THX-365C, Infinity RC263, NHT C LCR and other well regarded sealed 3-way centers all start to roll off at 100 Hz at 12 db per octave. It may not suit all personal preferences with all setups in all environments but it's the way quality sealed 3-way centers are designed for optimum reference performance.
Which is precisely why I specify 'in my room' and 'to my ear' in these posts. Centers that roll off at 100 Hz or above aren't my preference but many are very satisfied with it.
 
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