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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought antenna rotors were a thing of the past. Now, with the advent of broadcast HDTV, a rotor would increase the number of available HDTV channels by accessing the Philadelphia and NY markets. Unfortunately, when we built our house 2 years ago, we did not consider rotor control wiring.


Is there a rotor that can be remotely controlled via RF?


I looked at the channel Master, but it requires the control wire to run into the house to a controller box. I do not want to run any wires to the antenna other than power.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Candyman:
I looked at the channel Master, but it requires the control wire to run into the house to a controller box. I do not want to run any wires to the antenna other than power.
Candyman, it is less hassle to run a control wire (low voltage) than a 120VAC power drop that meets code. The control wire for the Channel Master 9521 is small and flexible.


With the Channel Master 9521 you can change the direction by entering the compass heading as a three digit number. Another method is to memorize the compass heading for each of your stations, then to change the heading for the desired station all you need to enter is the corresponding stations two digit number.


The 9521 comes with a IR remote. The IR system will emulate a couple of Pioneer products. This will allow most universal remotes to control your rotor. More info at:
http://www.channelmaster.com or this one to go direct to 9521 info: http://206.155.192.130/pages/rc1.htm


For the Channel Master Model 9521, try Consumer Direct at: http://www.consumerdirectonline.com or Stark Electronics at: http://starkelectronic.com



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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I knew, after I posted, that someone would realize that the power line is more difficult to run than the control wire.


In my situation, the antenna is in the attic and I can tap into the 120VAC line that supplies my attic fan. So, being the lazy couch potato that I am, I hoped that modern technology would have an easy option for me http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif
 

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OK, a lazy man's answer.

Buy a cheap IR repeater from the Shack. Now hook up everything in the attic, and leave the IR transmitter in the attic pointing toward the Channel master sensor. Make sure you keep that attic fan working, I don't thing the gear is made for high temps.

Take the IR receiver to the living room and put in on the TV, or next top the screen, whatever.

Now pop a beer.


SM

 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Swampfox, that sounds like it has potential. I've never used an IR repeater, so I'll have to do some research.


What I was hoping, is that someone had invented a rotor with the control signals multiplexed onto the antenna cable. Now that would be ideal!
 

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Well you have to run coaxial RG-6 anyway to the antenna, getting some Class 2 wiring to ride along is not any much more difficult.


The cable runs to my aerial are 150 feet, and that includes some underground placement, consider yourself lucky.


Rotors and aerial towers never died, there are plenty in this area. Analog Cable TV is just the lazy persons out to 57 channels and nothing on.



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Married Men Live Longer Than Single Men, But Married Men Are More Willing To Die.
 

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Originally posted by Steve13:
I would doubt you'd have much success with an RF IR repeater. There's going to be lot's of interference in the area of the antenna.

My suggestion was 1/2 in jest, but I don't think the antenna will cause interference. After all they receive, not transmit. Besides, you can run the control cord a good distance from the antenna, and have the IR devices away from the antenna. I had a repeater in a closet with a PC, talk about RF interference . . . all I had to move the repeater 3 or 4 ft from the PC to have it work.

The real issue will be the heat in tha attic in the summer. Consumer electronic equipment is not designed to operate under harsh conditions, and I would guess time-to-failure would be short.

A practical solution might be to have the rotor controller in a room upstairs, where the wire could be easily "fished". Then all sensitive gear is in conditioned space.

Another problem with the antenna in the attic is having enough space to rotate the antenna.


SM
 

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I would doubt you'd have much success with an RF IR repeater. There's going to be lot's of interference in the area of the antenna. If you're running coax to the attic, there are IR injectors that inject the IR into the coax. Here's an example. http://www.smarthome.com/8197.html. This kit has a few more pieces than you need, but it will give you an idea.


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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks to all for taking the time to contribute to this thread.


Steve13, your IR injector idea looks like the leading contender at the moment. I need to research that one some more.


HandvB, Will the noise cause problems for the rotor or for the antenna reception? I can tie into the circuit that feeds the fan or the circuit that feeds a light. The fan was my first choice because of its proximity to the antenna.


Another possibility I had is installing a second antenna pointed towards the NY market (roughly NE) and keeping the first pointed towards Phila (roughly South). I read about a ChannelMaster device that can multiplex the two antennas and provide good reception without the rotor.


Any thoughts on this idea?
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Candyman:
Another possibility I had is installing a second antenna pointed towards the NY market (roughly NE) and keeping the first pointed towards Phila (roughly South). I read about a ChannelMaster device that can multiplex the two antennas and provide good reception without the rotor.

Any thoughts on this idea?
I live between two transmitters and I installed a rotor, but I'm starting to think that the 2 antenna idea would be better. Here is the CM page on their antenna joiner products:
http://www.channelmaster.com/pages/cjs1.htm


I still think the rotor is retro-chic though. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif
 
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