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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a 4:3 standard (not widescreen) projector to hook up to a 480P source. It needs to display exceptional video (not film) quality.


Any suggestions?


Contrast is not a big deal and the projector will be in a semi-light controlled room.


Just needs to be below $800 new/refurbished/slightly used. Preferably in the $500 range.
 

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the proxima 2800 series are 640x480 and cost less than $80 used after shipping on ebay. they take $7 50 hour halogen bulbs. another you might look at is the lightbook, dukain and ez-pro, there all 800x600 and have the same cheep bulbs. for sd viewing there great but the CR and latency are some of the poorest that can be found out of all the lcd projectors.


in the crt relm for less than $200 you could get either a sony 10xx, electrohome ecp series. i would go for the ecp if you could find one, they do a great 1080i and 1024x768 computer with 20,000 CR, 60+fps great color(32millioin) and most have 3-8,000 hours left in them. they can handle a smokey environment, are very dependable but are very huge, 100lbs and up.


best buy per dollar right now would definatly be the 1024x768 lcd and 1050x1400. a friend of mine plays blue ray on the $650 2200 lumen one from staples that is a 1050x1400 native. he crops the sides off of 1080p and scales it to 1050x1400 and its incredible 4:3 high def. when its that big and sharp you never miss whats cut off on the sides. they can be picked up used for $500 so might as well buy that one new.


another option i recomend would be the jvc dila projectors that run 1024x1366. they are 4:3 and have decient latency. the contrast ratio is good but the bulb replacement is more than the projectors are worth. if you try for one of those make sure it has less than 200 hours so you can get at least 1000 hours out of it(1 year apr for most people) bulbs on those are $250-350


i personally started with a proxima 2810 and enjoyed it for 2 years, no keystone correction and peoples lips would blur when they talked but i was happy. i got a sony 1044 CRT for $180 after shipping and it beat the proxima in every way shape and form. it took me 3 hours or better to get it set up but when it was going it was good for 6 months then i replaced it with a barco graphics 808s (1600x1280 72hz) and never looked back. 720p on it looks better than any of the tv's they sell at walmart. you can pick up a bg808s right now for around $500 in great condition. only prob its a crt and will take you an hour to get a good picture out of it, and 3 huge friends to help you lift it to the ceiling. the bg808s has everything a guy could want, 20,000:1 CR, 72fps at 720p, 1080p softens to around 1600x900 which looks amazing. it will scan to 2560x2048 60hz(120mhz bandwith) only prob its 150lbs and your spouse will be afraid to sit under it. more room for you i guess
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CZ Eddie /forum/post/15528291


I'm looking for a 4:3 standard (not widescreen) projector to hook up to a 480P source. It needs to display exceptional video (not film) quality.


Any suggestions?


Contrast is not a big deal and the projector will be in a semi-light controlled room.


Just needs to be below $800 new/refurbished/slightly used. Preferably in the $500 range.

I'm going to be "that guy" - Why does it have to be 4:3?


My first PJ was a 4:3, and when I was going to replace it I started looking for the same as I didn't want to replace the screen. That said, you REALLY cut down your options when you do that. Most, if not all, 4:3 projectors are set up for data sources - not for video.


Now if you REALLY want/need to stick to 4:3, then you might want to look at the NEC VT800. It is only slightly less than your $800 limit, but it does have some cool features that may make it worth the extra money. Most notably the HQV chip for excellent video processing. It is also bright enough for what you are talking about. Just google it and you can find it for around $750 new.
 

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Okay - 4:3 is native aspect ratio and that doesn't necessarily specify other specs like resolution or input type and there are a number of so called "business" projectors available that are configured as "dual-mode" and do a very nice job of both PC format presentations and Movie presentations.


All digital input streams are "data".


Canon makes a very nice dual-mode projector - our first projector was a Canon 1024X768 and its' image processor had a Cinema Mode that when used with either component source/conntection or our preferred HDCP DVI digital input I can put it side-by-side with our wonderful Panasonic "HT" projector and it throws a very competitive movie image.


The model we bought almost 3 yrs ago is the Canon LV-7215 and we still use it for backyard outdoor HT and it works great as it is capable of throwing a much brighter image than the Panasonic.


Canon uses highest quality glass (lens) and other components so you could give them a look as the business class PJs are most always significantly less expensive than HT models.


So far as the dreaded "black bars" at top and bottom of the image just remember that ALL PJs must scale the widerscreen movie content which is a lot wider than 16:9 so you will have some black bars when watching most movies no matter which type projector you choose.


I have seen numerous Canon units new in the box both at Ebay and Overstock websites. Main necessary capabilities when considering a "business" projector are that it be dual-mode with a Cinema option with HDCP digital input - either DVI or HDMI along with component.

goodluck
 

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This is a very hard question because 480p projectors with great video quality do not really exist anymore in that price range. There are some decent 4:3 projectors in that price range, but nothing with exceptional video quality. Benq makes several models. Maybe you can find an Optoma H30 which was the last inexpensive 4:3 that had good video quality. Here is one place, but the site ratings are not great. I would call to make sure they have it in stock. http://salestores.com/oph30dlppr80.html
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by imjay /forum/post/15531968


Okay - 4:3 is native aspect ratio and that doesn't necessarily specify other specs like resolution or input type and there are a number of so called "business" projectors available that are configured as "dual-mode" and do a very nice job of both PC format presentations and Movie presentations.


All digital input streams are "data".

Yes, every digital signal is "Data", but I never mentioned digital signals.


I may be incorrect in using the term in this way, but to me a data signal is shorthand for computer display standards such as SVGA, and XGA. Both of these sginals can be sent via VGA cables - which is analog. I also used the term "video" meaning 480p, 720p, etc... These signals may also be transmitted in analog as they can be sent over component video, or even VGA (my old Tosh would accept YPbPr over VGA).


That clarified, business projectors are not optimized for video signals. That is a fact. They may produce an acceptable image but an NEC VT800 is built for an altogether different purpose than a Sharp DT-510. My old Toshiba TDP-S20U had modes for projecting in 16:9 and and accurate colour mode. That said, it was a x2 speed 4-segment wheel DLP machine. Fine for presentations, but not exactly a recipe for rich colour reproduction.


Also, the mark of a better projector that can wear two hats (business and HT) goes beyond an accurate colour mode and an HDCP compliant interface. That is why I mentioned the VT800 as it has an HQV chip.


If you are going to spend $800 on a projector that you are going to use to show video, does it not make sense to get something designed for it or at the very least has video processing on-board that can help it give the best possible image?


***Canon does make some nice units, and it is not like the NEC has tons more contrast - they are both really low. I just think that the HQV chip sets the NEC apart. The really nice Canon LCoS projectors are WAY out of the price range.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gwlaw99 /forum/post/15532002


This is a very hard question because 480p projectors with great video quality do not really exist anymore in that price range.

That is the problem. 4:3 projectors have skewed almost entirely into the viewing of spreadsheets and powerpoint.
 

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I know that I will be told I am terribly wrong by some 1080P folks, but we have really enjoyed our Sharp XR-30x for the last 14 months or so. We have a little less than 600 hours of videos on it - mostly from our DVD player at 480p but some from our Dish VIP722 running 1080i. The XR-30X is now discontinued, but I would assume that the XR-32X is very similar, just a tad brighter. The 30X is 2300 ANSI lumens, 2200:1 CR, 1024x768 Native and has component, DVI and other inputs. It also has an excellent cinema mode. As others have said, the optics are awesome. We watch it on a 115" screen at a distance of about 14'. Instead of mounting it from the ceiling, we put it in a furniture grade cabinet between our recliners. When watching it, we open the door and two fans come on - closed, you would never know it was there.


When I started out building our DVD collection, I tried to find full screen (4:3) as much as possible because I thought I would hate the black bars top and bottom. In use, you forget that they are even there as you watch the movie. Most of our current collection is either 16:9 or 'scope format. We chose not to border the screen in black velvet because it would draw attention to the different formats.
 

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I still like my X1 - native 800 X 600, Faroudja deinterlacer for 480i, PixelWorks scaler for 480p+. Going on 6 years now, only on second bulb. I recently compared it to my friend's 720p Samsung TV. Yes, he has better contrast during the day, but at night I'd still take my X1 for smoothness and overall presentation, HD source or not! Plus, his TV has jaggies, especially with HD channels (QAM via the TV's tuner on Comcast).


Not true HD on my X1, but quite viewable. I feed it 480p (DVDs) and HD (Comcast 1080i).


When I can earmark some funds, maybe, just maybe I'll upgrade to a HD65 or something, but not really in the market for at least another year. I guess I'm one of the few remaining holdouts...
 

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Brown; I think there are lots of us actually.


I've had my X1 4 years this month. I still have very few hours on the bulb (can't recall, but VERY few), as we have a few more TV's around the house for regular TV viewing. I'm one of the guys who'll most likely only go HD when the bulb calfs.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brown Radagast /forum/post/15534781


I still like my X1 - native 800 X 600, Faroudja deinterlacer for 480i, PixelWorks scaler for 480p+. Going on 6 years now, only on second bulb. I recently compared it to my friend's 720p Samsung TV. Yes, he has better contrast during the day, but at night I'd still take my X1 for smoothness and overall presentation, HD source or not! Plus, his TV has jaggies, especially with HD channels (QAM via the TV's tuner on Comcast).


Not true HD on my X1, but quite viewable. I feed it 480p (DVDs) and HD (Comcast 1080i).


When I can earmark some funds, maybe, just maybe I'll upgrade to a HD65 or something, but not really in the market for at least another year. I guess I'm one of the few remaining holdouts...
Quote:
Originally Posted by grantv /forum/post/15536186


Brown; I think there are lots of us actually.


I've had my X1 4 years this month. I still have very few hours on the bulb (can't recall, but VERY few), as we have a few more TV's around the house for regular TV viewing. I'm one of the guys who'll most likely only go HD when the bulb calfs.

You guys are agreeing with me without even knowing it!


The X1 was a superb projector, and they just don't build them like that anymore. While not a widescreen 720p projector Infocus built the X1 with both video and data in mind. The Faroudja and Pixelworks chipsets allowed the X1 to do very well with video.


Other than the VT800 I do not know of any other current 4:3 projectors that includes that level of video processing tech (not for under $1k anyhow).


You guys are going to find this out when you go to replace those machines!
 

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Infocus X6, $400
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Wow, too many suggestions here for me to really reply to them all!



I would definately prefer a CRT projector for this, because CRT typically offers the best video picture available. When I say "video", I mean 480i analog TV picture.

HDTV looks phenomenal on digital projectors and makes the CRT argument more difficult.


I've owned dozens of Electrohome Marquee and other CRT's.


But right now, I just need a 4:3 digital projector with a great picture, for a short term project. It will not be replacing my current 16:9 projector. I don't have time or the space to mess with a CRT. Plus, there aren't any local that are selling for a good price. And I'd lose money on shipping when I flip it in a month or two.


I'm liking the Optoma HD30 idea. I've had a couple of Infocus X1's. They are fine, but hopefully the HD30 being newer technology, will look better?

I have no need for the built in scaling/processing of the X1.


What I was really hoping for though, are suggestions of projectors that sold for $5000 (or whatever) just a few years ago and are today selling for a couple hundred dollars sicne they aren't HDCP or don't have digital input.


The JVC D'ILA would be a nice suggestion, but I don't think they were ever 4:3. At least not the good ones.


Thanks, everyone!
 

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If you are looking for a 4:3 projector that is better than an X1 you might have a hard time.


While you may not think you need the video processing, you will unless you are running it through an external scaler first. You are taking 480 line of interlaced video and giving it to a digital device that must project a different number (if you go with an SVGA or XGA projector). If you didn't like the X1, imagine what the picture would have been like if it didn't have the video processing. Also, the Optoma H30 is a year older than the X1. And check out those prices!


As for other technologies, JVC still charges a fortune as does Canon. The LCos Canon Realis X600 was launched in June 2006 for $4000 and still costs well over $2000 now - and it is an out of production model! Its replacement, the X700, goes for only slightly more. And we are talking about XGA projectors here.


I think you have two choices. Go with the cheapest 4:3 you can find (such as the Infocus X6 - which is not just a newer X1) and accept the picture quality as "YGWYPF" or you can look for a deal on the 720p models.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
FYI, I wound up going with the Sharp XR-10X because of it's native 1024x768 which would have offered a great picture without worry of screendoor effect. But the unit I bought from eBay was advertised as having ten hours and instead, it arrived with 1430 hours.


Needless to say, the picture looked like crap. Colors were washed out and focus was no longer perfect. Typical high hour projector picture.

I sent it back for a full refund.

Too bad though. The XR-10X is an inexpensive projector that seems to have a good rep on AVS. I would have liked to see how it compared against my Sharp XV-Z12000 MKii.


Thanks for all the suggestions.
 
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