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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my LCD for a few years now. Whats the best present way to calibrate an LCD TV? I was wondering If you could do it with a Spyder 2 that you use for a PC monitor. Or do you still basically have to do it by eye?

Also heard that some DVD THX discs have an "optimizer" you can use to do it with.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bsmooth /forum/post/20768863


I've had my LCD for a few years now. Whats the best present way to calibrate an LCD TV? I was wondering If you could do it with a Spyder 2 that you use for a PC monitor. Or do you still basically have to do it by eye?

Also heard that some DVD THX discs have an "optimizer" you can use to do it with.

You can use the AVS HD709 disk and calibrate the "basics", brightness, contrast, basic color, sharpness, aspect, etc.


You can use the same disk, or others, in conjunction with light meters etc.


You can pay to have a professional do it.


Some disks (THX) have the "built-in" calibration settings but I don't know how effective those are overall or if they just tweak your set based on THX standards for the particular movie.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So there really isn't any tried and true way to do a calibration the same way twice? Its all based on what you see, not like when you say have a PC monitor, load some Spyder 2(Colorimeter I think software) and run a test and basically get the same calibration everytime.

I put a few bars on the screen and visually try to match them certain ways and hope i got it pretty close, correct ?

Doesn't seem like a very good way to do it, considering.

Is there a way to hook it up to a PC and do it somehow?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bsmooth /forum/post/20773800


So there really isn't any tried and true way to do a calibration the same way twice? Its all based on what you see, not like when you say have a PC monitor, load some Spyder 2(Colorimeter I think software) and run a test and basically get the same calibration everytime.

I put a few bars on the screen and visually try to match them certain ways and hope i got it pretty close, correct ?

Doesn't seem like a very good way to do it, considering.

Is there a way to hook it up to a PC and do it somehow?

rahzel's suggestion is probably the best DIY method. It does take time and there is a learning curve if you've never done it before. You may be limited somewhat depending on the options that your tv has for setting the various parameters (CMS, IRE, etc).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bsmooth /forum/post/20768863


I've had my LCD for a few years now. Whats the best present way to calibrate an LCD TV? I was wondering If you could do it with a Spyder 2 that you use for a PC monitor. Or do you still basically have to do it by eye?

Also heard that some DVD THX discs have an "optimizer" you can use to do it with.

You sound to me like you'd really enjoy visiting the Display Calibration topic here on AVS. Lots of great info and professional calibrators there.
 

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There's a lot to learn for beginners, so IMO, it's best to read those guides I posted above, make a first attempt at calibration, then post any questions you may have in the Display Calibration section.


Btw, if your set has a 10pt grayscale/IRE adjustment, you'll need to use the 10% grayscale (0-100% in steps of 10) rather than high and low that's shown in the guides. If your set is a local dimming set, it's recommended to either turn it off and use windowed patterns, or leave it on and use full-field patterns.


Also forgot to mention that you'll need to grab AVS 709 that Otto mentioned above for test patterns if you don't have a disc like DVE or Spears & Munsil.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just found the DVD I used when I originally got the display. Its called Avia Guide to Home Theater, copyright 1989-1999, by Ovation software.

I did do a little reading and saw that the DVD they recommend Digital Video essentials, but is that the best one for beginners to use?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bsmooth
I just found the DVD I used when I originally got the display. Its called Avia Guide to Home Theater, copyright 1989-1999, by Ovation software.

I did do a little reading and saw that the DVD they recommend Digital Video essentials, but is that the best one for beginners to use?
It's all a matter of opinion. Disney has a new one called WOW Discover, Optimize and Experience HD Home Theatre. It's just about the best I have seen for beginners. On top of it, the producer is on-line at the Display Calibration area, where they have been discussing just about every parameter and every pro and con of this Blue-ray disk.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bsmooth
I just found the DVD I used when I originally got the display. Its called Avia Guide to Home Theater, copyright 1989-1999, by Ovation software.

I did do a little reading and saw that the DVD they recommend Digital Video essentials, but is that the best one for beginners to use?
SD and HD use different color spaces that have a different set of standards. HD uses REC 709 and SD uses REC 601, so it depends on what device you're calibrating (DVD player, Blu-Ray player etc.) Every device will probably be different too, so you'll probably have to calibrate for each device.

ColorHCFR (and other calibration software) allows you to select what color space you will be calibrating for, REC709 (HD) or REC601 (SD). It's all explained in the guides.


Avia should suffice for SD, but use AVS709 for HD. AVS709 has a manual that explains the different sections.

Really, the only thing that separates the different calibration discs, is how informative/helpful they are. All you really need help with, is how to set the basic settings like contrast, brightness, sharpness etc. For the meat of the calibration (grayscale and color) the only reason you really need the calibration discs are for the test patterns, and any of them should work fine; the rest is explained in the guides above.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rahzel
SD and HD use different color spaces that have a different set of standards. HD uses REC 709 and SD uses REC 601, so it depends on what device you're calibrating (DVD player, Blu-Ray player etc.) Every device will probably be different too, so you'll probably have to calibrate for each device.
That brings up an interesting point. I've always felt that each device should probably be calibrated, if possible, because the pathway is going to be different to the tv. However, there was a discussion, rather pointed, in another group that disagreed. Once properly calibrated, it should be good for all inputs. Thoughts? For the record, I calibrated via my BD player and use the same settings for OTA and my ATV2.
 

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In my limited experience, sometimes things can look a lot different, but that was back in the day with DVD players. Nowadays, settings seem to work quite well for other similar devices. If you have the equipment, it doesn't hurt to take a quick measurement. You might have to make some minor/small adjustments, but it will probably be close and probably wouldn't be noticeable anyway.


Obviously there are things that you can't calibrate, such as cable/satellite/OTA. Usually I just calibrate my main video device (which is my HTPC) and transfer the settings to cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Does that mean you need to adjust for regular HD and then Blu-Ray using 2 different calibration discs. I also heard that one of the Avia calibration DVD's put out a while ago was actually incorrect, is that the one I have by any chance?

I did check some of the settings last night and the Contrast was set at 95, which seems way too high, and I turned it down to 75, although for the Samsung I have which is a 530 series, I did see here under that particular series discussion, the settings were similar to what I had mine set to under settings that were done using a Calibration DVD.

I'll have to put the Cal disc in this weekend and check more thoroughly.

maybe I should get that Disney Cal DVD, I could use all the help I can get, is it availabe through Amazon? Or should I wander over to calibration discussion to check?
 

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HD is HD, you only need one disc for HD. SD requires an SD version. It's not essential... I have SD cable and just transferred my calibration settings from my HTPC. I don't really care how SD looks TBH.

Sorry, don't know much about Avia.


Many Samsung LCDs (and even their plasmas) can reach 100 contrast without many detrimental effects. In fact, most people have the contrast at around 90 or higher on Samsung displays.


Contrast essentially sets the peak light output or white level. You need to set it until one of the following happens:

1) you see white detail being clipped or crushed/removed

2) you see light shades of gray start to change color (usually pink)

3) you experience eye strain


If you don't see 1 or 2, then just set the contrast to a comfortable level for your viewing environment. Also keep in mind the backlight setting as it has a similar effect. Set contrast first, though, then the backlight because the backlight will make your black levels lighter whereas contrast doesn't.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thats the thing, when I have my setup screens on for my DVD player there burning in an image in as little as 4 or 5 minutes. So after a few inquires here and elsewhere that shouldn't be happening, so something must be set wrong, and someone here said 95 is wayyy too high.But my baclight is only at 3 and I think brightness is at 48, and I never had it set to dynamic, but I do use the movie setting.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rahzel
SD and HD use different color spaces that have a different set of standards. HD uses REC 709 and SD uses REC 601, so it depends on what device you're calibrating (DVD player, Blu-Ray player etc.) Every device will probably be different too, so you'll probably have to calibrate for each device.

ColorHCFR (and other calibration software) allows you to select what color space you will be calibrating for, REC709 (HD) or REC601 (SD). It's all explained in the guides.


Avia should suffice for SD, but use AVS709 for HD. AVS709 has a manual that explains the different sections.

Really, the only thing that separates the different calibration discs, is how informative/helpful they are. All you really need help with, is how to set the basic settings like contrast, brightness, sharpness etc. For the meat of the calibration (grayscale and color) the only reason you really need the calibration discs are for the test patterns, and any of them should work fine; the rest is explained in the guides above.
If the DVD is upscaled to HD resolution, it should not matter that it's a DVD and not a BD.
 
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