AVS Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have older VHS tapes and VHS-C camcorder tapes that I would like to capture to DVD. Is there an ideal way to do this? Right now I have a PC capable of capturing S-video sources, and I have a reasonabley good JVC HS7800U SVHS VCR. I am using a Hauppauge 250 PCI card I believe, and the supplied coftware. I have managed to make a friend a dvd copy of their VHS tape to play in their dvd player, and it worked ok. It was an clay-mation animated cartoon for their kids, so it wasn't very taxing. The main thing I want to transer is VHS-C camcorder tapes of a vacation to see relatives years ago, and numerous videos of punk-rock (hardcore) bands from the late 80's early 90's.


I'm just wondering if there is a better way to do this. I realize it will look a little soft and blurry compared to the dvd and hd signals I've become used to over the years, and also it may not look quite as good as it does when it's simply played back on an interlaced tv. I just want to know if anybody has any suggestions for how I can maximize the quality of the transfer that I am doing. I always experiment with the TBC DNR and use it accordingly. If it looks ok without, I leave it off, if it looks too noisey, I use the DNR.


I have a DVDO VP50 which can de-interlace video very well, but I don't know if that can help me, unless there is a way to record progressive component signals on my PC somehow. Perhaps another card? Basically, I'm not sure the de-interlacing of the hauppauge card is good enough. If I could use the DVDO to de-interlace and then somehow record/capture the progressive signal..that would be best. I would only record it at 480p onto a dvd. No need to upscale any further, although I could experiment and see how it looked at higher resolutions.


thanks in advance for any help,




P.S. I also have to find another VHS-C adapter, as I seem to have lost the old one. It's a pain to have to open a VHS-C tape and try to put it into a regular VHS cassette case. It works, but it's not without it's issues



P.S.S. Maybe I can clear something up first. When I capture from a VCR to my PC, is the result an interlaced file? When I burn to dvd is it from an interlaced file or did the hauppauge or my PC de-interlace it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Im also interested in some feedback on the best way to Convert from VHS to DVD. I know you probably need a good VCR... but is it best to capture it to a computer, and then encode to a DVD, or just buy a DVD recorder and do it that way?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,088 Posts
Just use an analog video capture card and an appropriate software program. I know Pinnacle markets a kit for doing this very thing and I'm sure there are at least a few others. Install the capture card and software on your PC, connect up the VCR or camcorder, and let the software control the playback device. If you have an older VCR you may have to control it manually, but some apps provide direct control of the tape transport, especially if you have a camcorder with either a Firewire or USB connection.


Once the video has been transferred to your PC you can edit it and create your own DVDs using most any authoring program out there. You can add menus and musical backgrounds as well as narrations for that professional look.


You can also use a standalone DVD recorder, but you lose any flexibility for creating your own customized DVDs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,435 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Is there better software than what comes with my Hauppauge 250 PCI card? Is the supplied software that came with my capture card good enough? What level do I chose to record at?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,314 Posts
Here's a pretty good guide . I converted a lot of old college football and basketball games from VHS to DVD using it, worked pretty well. Now I've switched to encoding to H264, so some of the final steps are different. If you use VirtualVCR, it's a bit finicky but it works.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,964 Posts
I use VMC to record the vcr tape. I plug in the VCR to the coax where my cable is normally connected, then I change VMC to a channel which is going to play for a LONG time and that I know will not have a "do not copy" bit set, such as CSPAN.


I start the recording, then press play on the VCR. VMC thinks it is recording the channel, and even saves it as that name, but it is actually recording the VCR tape.


I then use DVR-MS Editor to chop out the parts I do not want.


Then I use Roxio to turn it into a DVD. The newer Roxios can read DVR-MS files.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top