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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys/gals,


I'm looking for a little advice on the best/reliable way to match drivers for a single speaker. Lets say for sake of discussion a 3-way, TMW.


Currently, I've just been taking into consideration senistivity, frequency response, and of course load. I've been using the manufacturer frequency response graphs to see how well the respective drivers will blend, using that info to gauge crossover points.


However being a newb, I was wondering if I should be focusing more attention on other aspects of the T/S values? ...and/or possibly ignoring the manufacturer graphs and utilize third party results for frq response.?


All opinions welcome, and suggestions for third party sites would be appreciated. From what I've read on here and other forums. Some have their favourite testers and within the same discussions others will discredit those results.


I did do a search thinking this must be a common question, but didn't find anything to conclusive. If I missed something I apologise in advance.


TIA
 

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Have you considered any of the already proven DIY designs? Some say simulations from FRD files and T/S params will get you close enough while others firmly believe in full measuring capabilities. A 3way xover is a DIY nightmare in itself and without reliable freq response graphs, a shot in the dark at best. Given the cost of amplification and digital processors, you might consider an active crossover like a behringer dcx unit which will give you the flexibility to match most passive designs without the expense of components, modeling software and timely measurements and equipment. It will also allow for an educational curve as well, being able to audibly detect the differences in xo points, slopes, etc. Proper physical layout of the baffle considering the design will still have to be followed of course.


It really depends on how much time and effort you're willing to put into this. If it's a one shot deal, then i say build an existing design. But if you plan on doing more and the learning curve interests you, invest in the measuring gear or the digital xover and amps. Either way, you'll get plenty of help here and on other forums as you go. I'd consider the intended purpose of the speaker first and work outwards from there. A lot of new and progressive thinking in regards to driver types and alignments being better or worse for different applications. It helps to have a reference point in memory as well, meaning a listening experience that may have inspired this whole thing to start. For me it was a pair of B&W 800s in a treated room playing Dark Side of the Moon on Vinyl. That's waay out of my price range, but i'll keep plugging away with DIY to get as close as i can. In the long run if i consider the amount of time and materials i have and will use, i could've probobly bought those B&Ws..LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

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Originally Posted by mayhem13 /forum/post/15577137


Have you considered any of the already proven DIY designs?

Nope... not interested honestly. That's not meant to belittle anyone's efforts by any means though. I'm a troubleshooter/tweaker by trade, so to me building someone else's design is cutting corners, and futile if you have any desire to learn from the experience. Odds are...whatever I do happen to come up with, will have already been done by someone else, and I certainly could have saved time. However I have an abundance of time, and I believe in getting my hands dirty...so to speak


Quote:
Some say simulations from FRD files and T/S params will get you close enough while others firmly believe in full measuring capabilities. A 3way xover is a DIY nightmare in itself and without reliable freq response graphs, a shot in the dark at best.

Thanks... this is kind of feedback I was looking for. The 3-way was just an common example I had in my head that illustrates the improtance of what I consider "matching". Seeing as all three would have to "play well" together for the end result to be worth while. Not that I need to explain that improtance to you....it was just so the forum could see where I was coming from, and was more so an effort in not being vague with my question.

Quote:
Given the cost of amplification and digital processors, you might consider an active crossover like a behringer dcx unit which will give you the flexibility to match most passive designs without the expense of components, modeling software and timely measurements and equipment. It will also allow for an educational curve as well, being able to audibly detect the differences in xo points, slopes, etc. Proper physical layout of the baffle considering the design will still have to be followed of course.

An active crossover is on the short list for the B-day...
. Thanks for the model suggestion.


Short of removing a limp in a cabinet building accident
I hope to take several kicks at the dyi speaker can. From what I've picked up already on many forums, your active crossover advice for sake of tweaking/learning is exactly what I plan to do. While I'm certainly a newb, I'm definitely not under the delusion that I can build a crossover strickly by the numbers (SW) and expect the result to be completely satisfying on a sonic level.

Quote:
It helps to have a reference point in memory as well, meaning a listening experience that may have inspired this whole thing to start. For me it was a pair of B&W 800s in a treated room playing Dark Side of the Moon on Vinyl. That's waay out of my price range, but i'll keep plugging away with DIY to get as close as i can. In the long run if i consider the amount of time and materials i have and will use, i could've probobly bought those B&Ws..LOL.

lol....
As long as I don't hit that milestone within the first year, I'll be happy.


I appreciate the response..., and look forward to having my first design torn apart by the guru's here...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem13 /forum/post/15577137


Have you considered any of the already proven DIY designs? Some say simulations from FRD files and T/S params will get you close enough while others firmly believe in full measuring capabilities. A 3way xover is a DIY nightmare in itself and without reliable freq response graphs, a shot in the dark at best. Given the cost of amplification and digital processors, you might consider an active crossover like a behringer dcx unit which will give you the flexibility to match most passive designs without the expense of components, modeling software and timely measurements and equipment. It will also allow for an educational curve as well, being able to audibly detect the differences in xo points, slopes, etc. Proper physical layout of the baffle considering the design will still have to be followed of course.

I wouldn't say a 3 way crossover is a nightmare, but then again my major is electrical engineering. Some good software like Filterpro and Pspice makes things much easier.
 

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Ok, now that you're ready to go, check out zaphaudio.com and review the driver tests. The graph data will give you a good idea of the range the individual drivers should be used in. Zaph's comments on each driver are also very helpful. Post your selections and design intentions in a new thread and see where it takes you. Good luck and Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by yelnatsch517 /forum/post/15591371


I wouldn't say a 3 way crossover is a nightmare, but then again my major is electrical engineering. Some good software like Filterpro and Pspice makes things much easier.

I'm with ya... If I had to do this with paper/pencil, I would be terrified. As it is, modern science hopefully will make things a little easier.


I'm keeping an eye out for something along the lines of the DCX2496 (used) to test with before building passive networks. The way I see it, if I decide after some time not build anymore, the DCX (and multi ch amp) will make the LCR of my HT the best it can be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by mayhem13 /forum/post/15591451


Ok, now that you're ready to go, check out zaphaudio.com and review the driver tests. The graph data will give you a good idea of the range the individual drivers should be used in. Zaph's comments on each driver are also very helpful. Post your selections and design intentions in a new thread and see where it takes you. Good luck and Enjoy!

Oh ya... I've had Zaph's site on the favourites list for some time..



I think my step will be some hardcopy literature... Cookbook seems to be crowd fav. I look forward to input this site can offer, but I think I'll try to educate myself some before I riddle the forum with too many newb questions.


Thanks for the feedback, and the advice. Again...it's very appreciated
 

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Reading up on all these DIY speakers and designs and whatnot, the only question I have is how well these speakers end up performing. It seems the best speakers on Zaphaudio is the ZD5 using Scan Speak 15W8530K00 and the Vifa XT25TG30-04 drivers. How well would those speakers perform compared to commercially available speakers?
 
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