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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
looking for something better than Optoma GT1080Darbee if there are any at this pricepoint under $800, when you suggest a brand and model pls explain why you think its better
criteria:
Short Throw (need)
price point max at $800
resolution at least native 1080p or higher
has Audio out
brighter than 3k lumens

thank you


 

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Hello,
looking for something better than Optoma GT1080Darbee if there are any at this pricepoint under $800, when you suggest a brand and model pls explain why you think its better
criteria:
Short Throw (need)
price point max at $800
resolution at least native 1080p or higher
has Audio out
brighter than 3k lumens

thank you


BenQ 2150st is the most recommended, is about $50 over your budget but is not rated @ 3k lumens. The Optoma is only rated that high because is has a white segmented color wheel but the BenQ has an RGBRGB wheel. As far as calibrated color lumens they are most likely about the same. Short throw range of projectors has kind of been left in the dust and you don't have much to choose from.
 

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If you need more than 3,000 lumens, the problem is your room, not your projector.

Color accuracy and contrast are the biggest qualifiers for image quality, and the BenQ 2150ST does a better job than Optoma with both of these. It has much higher color brightness creating a real world calibrated lumen count closer to 1,400 lumens compared to under 1,000 for the Optoma. They are not 'close' in terms of brightness really. The Optoma can look very nice, but gives up a lot of light output to get the same color saturation that BenQ delivers by default.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you need more than 3,000 lumens, the problem is your room, not your projector.

Color accuracy and contrast are the biggest qualifiers for image quality, and the BenQ 2150ST does a better job than Optoma with both of these. It has much higher color brightness creating a real world calibrated lumen count closer to 1,400 lumens compared to under 1,000 for the Optoma. They are not 'close' in terms of brightness really. The Optoma can look very nice, but gives up a lot of light output to get the same color saturation that BenQ delivers by default.
when you say my room is the problem, what do you mean? I have too much light in the room? will the BenQ 2150ST be more washed out than Optoma in my room with given specs? does the BenQ 2150ST need a darker room since a lot less lumens?
 

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What size screen are you using? Unless you have an abnormally large screen and the Optoma is too washed out then you definitely have an ambient light issue. As AV said the BenQ colors are actually brighter then the Optomas. The Optoma's higher lumen rating is white light only and if your using it in its brighter mode it will look more washed out anyways because colors aren't as bright as the white light.
 

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when you say my room is the problem, what do you mean? I have too much light in the room? will the BenQ 2150ST be more washed out than Optoma in my room with given specs? does the BenQ 2150ST need a darker room since a lot less lumens?
I don't know what it is about your current setup that you don't like.

One thing I will say is that you need to READ REVIEWS and not manufacturer specifications (AKA: LIES) because reviews will tell you the truth about brightness at different settings.
Optoma usually has a projector which calibrates to about 800 lumens or so. BenQ calibrates closer to 1,200 to 1,400 lumens. So, you get a lot MORE brightness out of the BenQ compared to the 'higher rated' Optoma model. This is all about color wheels.

But, if you're unhappy with an image, then you have to determine what it is that makes you unhappy. Contrast is a huge consideration, and nothing impacts image quality more than the ambient light in the room.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I don't know what it is about your current setup that you don't like.

One thing I will say is that you need to READ REVIEWS and not manufacturer specifications (AKA: LIES) because reviews will tell you the truth about brightness at different settings.
Optoma usually has a projector which calibrates to about 800 lumens or so. BenQ calibrates closer to 1,200 to 1,400 lumens. So, you get a lot MORE brightness out of the BenQ compared to the 'higher rated' Optoma model. This is all about color wheels.

But, if you're unhappy with an image, then you have to determine what it is that makes you unhappy. Contrast is a huge consideration, and nothing impacts image quality more than the ambient light in the room.
ok that makes more sense ty
 

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ok that makes more sense ty
You need to understand projectors do not project out black light that lights up the screen as black the way they do color. Black is made by the projector sending out no light and what you will see as black is what the screen looks like with whatever light is in the room lighting the screen. So a white screen in a room with some lights on will look white not black. When you start looking at an image that is lacking black and dark details it looks washed out and nothing but correcting the room will fix that. A million lumen projector still makes black by sending out zero lumens.
There are two types of ambient light. First is windows and lights you may have turned on. The second type is the light bouncing off the walls and ceilings that is coming from the projector. The projectors light can get bounced back off the room to the screen and ruin your image. This is the reason when you go to a movie theater they don’t have windows and they turn off all the lights and why the ceiling is black and the walls are dark colors to absorb stray light from the screen. :)
 

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A million lumen projector still makes black by sending out zero lumens.
While not 100% true (human vision does have a sliding scale of dynamic range that adjusts by opening/closing your eye's iris), the sentiment here is correct.
 

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While not 100% true (human vision does have a sliding scale of dynamic range that adjusts by opening/closing your eye's iris), the sentiment here is correct.
It was the sentiment I was going for.

With newcomers to FP I have found they can get easily overwhelmed when jumping from the basics to things like perception of blacks and contrast as compared to what is black.

I tend to read thru and try and get a feel for where the OP is in his understandings of FP and then give a nudge in the direction of understanding. Lately (last few years) projectors have come way down in price where someone can get a nice enough projector for say 500 bucks. The manufactures of projectors do us no favors showing the family of four wildly entertained watching a 120” movie in their white living room with a wall of windows and some lights on and the image on the screen is colorful with deep blacks. Then there are the screen manufactures doing pretty much the same thing and claiming ALR properties without any of the drawbacks. All this misinformation in marketing and then half of what I read here says the wife will absolutely not allow windows being covered or walls and ceiling being anything but white etc.

So from time to time I over simplify. Actually when a projector wants to send out black it only tries to send out no light but for the most part in the <3000 forum it sends out more light than most of us would like. So black is not really what the screen looks like with just ambient it is a little bit brighter than that.

I’m a proponent of simple neutral density gray screens and brighter projectors mine being .5 gain. I didn’t get into that as well, but I have found lowering the black floor by half to start and then evoking perception with an extra bright projector can produce some nice illusions of black in brighter content like sports and such.

There are many things that can be done but trying to correct the low hanging fruit problems of the room are the best starting place.
I never want to discourage people from thinking about FP as there is much to love about it. It is a bit more complex than buying and hanging a 60” TV though and getting an amazing image. :)
 
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