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I'm getting a center channel speaker that supports bi-wiring. There's something about it that I don't get and I'm hoping someone can explain it to me.


If I don't bi-wire, I connect a single set of red and black from my center channel output posts to a set of terminals on the speaker. There are metal strips shorting the two sets of inputs to my speaker so the signal goes to both sets of inputs equally.


If I bi-wire, i take out the strips on the speaker, removing the short at the speaker and run a second set of wires from the center channel to the second set of inputs on the speaker. Effectively the short is moved from the speaker to the receiver center channel output posts.


Electrically, outside of some impedance in the wires (which is negligable), these are identical setups.


What am I missing?


The only thing I can think of is the wires that short the two sets of terminals on the speaker aren't actually shorting the two connections and the connection is part of a series connection.
 

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Your going to get a lot of different opinions on this matter. I don't know a lot of the science of it but for me personally, I bi-wire because I can. I can't say I hear a difference in the sound but something about having two sets of inputs and only using one bothered me lol.
 

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You are not missing anything; it's the same circuit. I presume that the high-frequency part of the crossover will draw less current than the low frequency part, and that some people assume that the signal going through the HF wires won't be as affected by the wire because of the lower current. But if the wire is of sufficient gauge in the first place, it doesn't change anything.
 
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