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I'm considering looking into a bias light strip to place around my Samsung edge-lit LCD to combat horrific blooming I'm experiencing in a dark environment when viewing HDR content (scope widescreen films on UHD Blu-rays).

However, my display resides in a pretty massive entertainment center that was customized about three years ago to fit the bigger 65-inch size of the Samsung as compared to the 50-inch Sony SXRD rear projection screen that was there previously, and I'm not sure the light strip would be of any use behind the screen because of the fact that the television is surrounded on all sides by the entertainment center (if you can picture it)...

In other words, would I benefit from bias lighting in my case if there really isn't much room for the light to "shine through" (except for the bottom by the stand, which is open) because it's in a wall unit?

If it would help, I could take some pictures...
 

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I'm considering looking into a bias light strip to place around my Samsung edge-lit LCD to combat horrific blooming I'm experiencing in a dark environment when viewing HDR content (scope widescreen films on UHD Blu-rays).

However, my display resides in a pretty massive entertainment center that was customized about three years ago to fit the bigger 65-inch size of the Samsung as compared to the 50-inch Sony SXRD rear projection screen that was there previously, and I'm not sure the light strip would be of any use behind the screen because of the fact that the television is surrounded on all sides by the entertainment center (if you can picture it)...

In other words, would I benefit from bias lighting in my case if there really isn't much room for the light to "shine through" (except for the bottom by the stand, which is open) because it's in a wall unit?

If it would help, I could take some pictures...
It all depends on how much space you have between the edges of the tv and enclosure. The MediaLight bias light for a 65" panel is not that expensive so I'd try it. It may give you a slight improvement which would be good.
 

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It all depends on how much space you have between the edges of the tv and enclosure. The MediaLight bias light for a 65" panel is not that expensive so I'd try it. It may give you a slight improvement which would be good.
Thanks very much, Otto.

The screen is pretty tight against the top, left and right edges where they meet the entertainment enclosure (almost flush, but with a half a centimeter or so of space); the bottom is completely open, where the display sits on the stand...
 

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Thanks very much, Otto.

The screen is pretty tight against the top, left and right edges where they meet the entertainment enclosure (almost flush, but with a half a centimeter or so of space); the bottom is completely open, where the display sits on the stand...
That doesn't sound like you would get any benefit from a bias light then. You also want the bias light be reflecting off of a neutral colored surface so if it's in a tight enclosure, that is dark as well.......
 

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That doesn't sound like you would get any benefit from a bias light then. You also want the bias light be reflecting off of a neutral colored surface so if it's in a tight enclosure, that is dark as well.......
Unfortunately, that is what I'd thought you say; but actually, with regard to the BACK of the screen, there is nothing blocking it back there (the entertainment center is open in that section so I can access cables) but the wall that it's on is not a light color.
 

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Unfortunately, that is what I'd thought you say; but actually, with regard to the BACK of the screen, there is nothing blocking it back there (the entertainment center is open in that section so I can access cables) but the wall that it's on is not a light color.
The back being open is fine but if you can't see the wall from the viewing position, all you're gonna get is a tiny sliver of light around the sides and then a big blast of light coming out of the bottom. The idea of a bias light is to trick the mind and eyes into perceiving a higher contrast and better pq by illuminating the wall behind the panel so that the light bounces off of the wall and to your eyes, not directly in your eyes like what comes from the panel. I use bias lighting on the LCD for the downstairs HTS as well as the OLED for the upstairs HTS. Both panels sit on media consoles in front of a neutral colored wall.
 

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The back being open is fine but if you can't see the wall from the viewing position, all you're gonna get is a tiny sliver of light around the sides and then a big blast of light coming out of the bottom. The idea of a bias light is to trick the mind and eyes into perceiving a higher contrast and better pq by illuminating the wall behind the panel so that the light bounces off of the wall and to your eyes, not directly in your eyes like what comes from the panel. I use bias lighting on the LCD for the downstairs HTS as well as the OLED for the upstairs HTS. Both panels sit on media consoles in front of a neutral colored wall.
I see, and I understand what you're saying about the light coming out of the bottom.

Seems like I am either going to have to save up for a FALD or OLED, or find another way around this blooming issue...

Let me ask you this: Being that I already tried activating the "Ambient Light Detection" in my Samsung (when viewing HDR) and it reduced the blooming at the expense of cutting WAY down on the spectacular highlights (thus defeating the point of HDR) because the backlight dims in response to room conditions, what else can I try in terms of settings to reduce the blooming in letterbox areas of scope films? I didn't care for the way the picture looked with the backlight reduced, so I need to find another way; I also tried lowering the local dimming from high to the middle setting, standard, but this didn't really stop the aggressiveness of the dimming, ultimately not cutting down on the blooming really.

Can I try dropping the brightness (black level) a couple of clicks, or would this not really affect the blooming? I don't want to mess with lowering the gamma slider (which would make the picture darker) with HDR, so my only other choice would be to play with brightness.

Should I mess with any settings in my Panasonic UHD Blu-ray player, which offers a plethora of tweaks -- from the usual brightness, contrast, color, etc. to all sorts of things to play with in the "HDR Optimizer" menu?
 

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I don't know of any way to really eliminate or reduce blooming on a panel. I've never experienced it on any of my panels to the degree that it adversely affected the pq. I just don't see it. When you start messing with the settings you always affect another setting which can create yet another issue. Edge lit has always had its issues. It's just the nature of the beast.
 

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I see, and I understand what you're saying about the light coming out of the bottom.

Seems like I am either going to have to save up for a FALD or OLED, or find another way around this blooming issue...

Let me ask you this: Being that I already tried activating the "Ambient Light Detection" in my Samsung (when viewing HDR) and it reduced the blooming at the expense of cutting WAY down on the spectacular highlights (thus defeating the point of HDR) because the backlight dims in response to room conditions, what else can I try in terms of settings to reduce the blooming in letterbox areas of scope films? I didn't care for the way the picture looked with the backlight reduced, so I need to find another way; I also tried lowering the local dimming from high to the middle setting, standard, but this didn't really stop the aggressiveness of the dimming, ultimately not cutting down on the blooming really.

Can I try dropping the brightness (black level) a couple of clicks, or would this not really affect the blooming? I don't want to mess with lowering the gamma slider (which would make the picture darker) with HDR, so my only other choice would be to play with brightness.

Should I mess with any settings in my Panasonic UHD Blu-ray player, which offers a plethora of tweaks -- from the usual brightness, contrast, color, etc. to all sorts of things to play with in the "HDR Optimizer" menu?
Please provide a photo of the entire wall the TV cabinet sits in front of from the primary viewing location or line of sight with that seat.
 

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I don't know of any way to really eliminate or reduce blooming on a panel. I've never experienced it on any of my panels to the degree that it adversely affected the pq. I just don't see it. When you start messing with the settings you always affect another setting which can create yet another issue. Edge lit has always had its issues. It's just the nature of the beast.
This is what I was advised on, as well; the best way to reduce or eliminate blooming is to lower the BACKLIGHT of an LCD way down -- but this is okay for SDR, not HDR content. As we know, HDR requires the backlight to be maxed out, and THAT'S what causes the severe blooming in my room. For SDR content, I keep the backlight of my Samsung on "11" out of "50," and this not only hits the target 100cm light output for standard DVDs and Blu-rays in a dark room, it practically eliminates blooming with these sources. It's the HDR that my TV has a bad issue with.

It's surprising you never experienced bad blooming on any of your panels, unless you always bought a FALD or OLED; those wouldn't really expose the issue.
 

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This is what I was advised on, as well; the best way to reduce or eliminate blooming is to lower the BACKLIGHT of an LCD way down -- but this is okay for SDR, not HDR content. As we know, HDR requires the backlight to be maxed out, and THAT'S what causes the severe blooming in my room. For SDR content, I keep the backlight of my Samsung on "11" out of "50," and this not only hits the target 100cm light output for standard DVDs and Blu-rays in a dark room, it practically eliminates blooming with these sources. It's the HDR that my TV has a bad issue with.

It's surprising you never experienced bad blooming on any of your panels, unless you always bought a FALD or OLED; those wouldn't really expose the issue.
I do have an OLED upstairs, and the LCD downstairs, which I will be replacing this year being as it is 10 years old, is LCD (not LED back lit) and it still looks as good as the day I brought it home (it's an LG LD520). I'm looking to replace it with the new Q80A once the reviews are in because an OLED won't work for the downstairs family room.
 

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I do have an OLED upstairs, and the LCD downstairs, which I will be replacing this year being as it is 10 years old, is LCD (not LED back lit) and it still looks as good as the day I brought it home (it's an LG LD520). I'm looking to replace it with the new Q80A once the reviews are in because an OLED won't work for the downstairs family room.
I believe the LG 40" LCD (1080p) in my bedroom is one of those non-LED backlit models; there's no dimming algorithm whatsoever, and sometimes I feel like it performs much better than the expensive new(ish) 4K panel we use in the home theater.....:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::mad:
 

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This could interest you guys:
This may look like fun but it destroys image fidelity and viewing comfort!


"THE IMPORTANCE OF VIEWING ENVIRONMENT CONDITIONS IN A REFERENCE DISPLAY SYSTEM"
 

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I believe the LG 40" LCD (1080p) in my bedroom is one of those non-LED backlit models; there's no dimming algorithm whatsoever, and sometimes I feel like it performs much better than the expensive new(ish) 4K panel we use in the home theater.....:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::mad:
Yep. I really like the old LG LD520 (1080 only). It's calibrated, and even tho it has an S-IPS panel, the use of the bias light at night mitigates the shortcomings of the IPS panel so pq is still excellent for a 10-year old "dumb" tv. We just want something a bit bigger (it's 47") so a 55" new tv, with current bells and whistles, will work just fine. I'm not impressed with LG's LED's so I'm looking at Samsung. Not a gamer so I don't have to worry about any of the HDMI 2.1 hype. The OLED upstairs is an LG and it has phenomenal pq.
 

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Yep. I really like the old LG LD520 (1080 only). It's calibrated, and even tho it has an S-IPS panel, the use of the bias light at night mitigates the shortcomings of the IPS panel so pq is still excellent for a 10-year old "dumb" tv. We just want something a bit bigger (it's 47") so a 55" new tv, with current bells and whistles, will work just fine. I'm not impressed with LG's LED's so I'm looking at Samsung. Not a gamer so I don't have to worry about any of the HDMI 2.1 hype. The OLED upstairs is an LG and it has phenomenal pq.
I hear ya...

Just based on my personal experience, I can't recommend a Samsung (we had techs come out to our home three times when the panel when just a month old, under warranty, to fix an HDMI board problem that was never really fixed even after the board was swapped out for a "new one;" long story), but I understand that nearly every brand has horror stories like this...
 

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I hear ya...

Just based on my personal experience, I can't recommend a Samsung (we had techs come out to our home three times when the panel when just a month old, under warranty, to fix an HDMI board problem that was never really fixed even after the board was swapped out for a "new one;" long story), but I understand that nearly every brand has horror stories like this...
I'm hoping that I have the same good luck with the Samsung that we're looking at that I did with both of the LG's (C8 and LD520). Zero issues OOB. It just seems that LG has missed the mark in the last couple of years with the LED sets, concentrating their efforts on OLED. We'll see in a couple of months.
 

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I'm hoping that I have the same good luck with the Samsung that we're looking at that I did with both of the LG's (C8 and LD520). Zero issues OOB. It just seems that LG has missed the mark in the last couple of years with the LED sets, concentrating their efforts on OLED. We'll see in a couple of months.
Indeed, I have heard nothing but bad things about LG's non-OLED models...

Being that only Sony and LG offer OLEDs (in the States anyway; I know Panasonic offers them in other regions), which would you recommend if I were to look to an OLED for our next display? Which brand does it better, so to speak, or are they about the same, being that I read LG makes the OLED panels for Sony?
 

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Indeed, I have heard nothing but bad things about LG's non-OLED models...

Being that only Sony and LG offer OLEDs (in the States anyway; I know Panasonic offers them in other regions), which would you recommend if I were to look to an OLED for our next display? Which brand does it better, so to speak, or are they about the same, being that I read LG makes the OLED panels for Sony?
They all have issues of one sort or another and they all have bad panels from time to time, even the ones outsourced from LG to Sony and others. I have been very happy with my LG C8. Never had any issues with it. That being said, I am not one to go looking for problems if I don't see any. I'm OCD (like most of us on this forum ;) ) but I don't bother to run slides and check for issues or anomalies because I know I will find them. No panel is perfect. So for me, if I don't see any problems in picture quality, regardless of the source, then there are no problems. That keeps me sane and my wife happy.

That being said, OLEDs do take more extra care and feeding than an LED. Our primary viewing is downstairs where I will be replacing the LCD with an LED as I have mentioned. So, if I care to watch CNN for example, or any program that may have a static logo, I don't worry about burn in or image retention because it won't happen. On an OLED, it MAY happen over a long period of time so I just don't watch that type of programming upstairs. Downstairs, there is a lot of window light that indirectly can hit the panel. I won't worry about that on an LED but I would with an OLED. So again, upstairs I have much better control over ambient room light. I can leave one window shade open all the time on one side of the room but the other window shade is closed all of the time because it has more direct sunlight.

When it comes time to replace the LG OLED, I will look first to LG to see what is offered. I have been very happy with their products and quality. Can't speak to service because I've never had to make a service call. I've called Support because I had a setting question but that's been it since I've had the C8 (Nov. 2018).
 
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