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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
UPDATE: all but spots along sidewalls (and a few other things) are done.




Status pictures taken on april 2, 2018

So - it's time to start sharing my construction of HT v2 !! I never got around to sharing V.1 – not least since no construction was done πŸ™‚ I have been lurking on AVS since 2004, when HT v.1 went live; now its time to share my own project.

It was started in the winter of 2008-2009, but has suffered a 4 year pause due to a PhD project, after step 4 was finished. My oldest son (12 years old) and I picked up the project in the fall of 2014 πŸ™‚

Biografen means "the cinema" or "the movie theater" in Danish, and that's what the room and the project is called in my family.

This thread will serve as place keeper for plans and thoughts and serve as construction log, with pictures. I will share the process of the already completed steps (1-22), as well, including pictures.

The home theater is an attic that after phase 1-3 in the plan below now measures (LxWxH) 6.3 x 3.8 x 2.3 meters (20.7' x 12.5' x 7.5'). I am really missing 2-3 feet in width and 2 feet in length, but the room is as it is. It will be tight when coming and going, as I decided for two rows of four seats (Berkline 090) at the expense of walking area. There will only be two really good seats, but guests will still be impressed, I am sure πŸ™‚

The style will be a clean theater look, with an AT screen on a false wall, GOM covered walls and ceiling - black ceiling, burgundy walls - and a black oak hardwood floor. The room has classic attic sloping walls - these will be black as well.

Since the constructions has been underway for some time now, most of the design decisions have already been made, but there will will be plenty of smaller decisions yet to make, where I hope to get comments and tips from the fabulous members of this forum πŸ™‚

I have been inspired by many, many threads, but mostly from from Sandman/SmX (star ceiling, AT screen), CJO (Dark Knight Cinema), and Cathan (Flaming Oak Cinema). In addition, Bryan Pape has advised me (in 2008) on the acoustic treatment plan.

Post 1 will describe the plans as well as show the latest pictures. I will post links from the plan to the respective posts that start a new phase.
Post 2 will briefly describe the background of the project, i.e. HT v.1
POST 3 will be reserved for final pictures
Post 4 and forward will be construction log

Overall Plan:
1) Clear out HT v1. and make an interim setup in game room - under the name "Sal 2" (Cinema 2 in Danish) DONE! (link)
2) Isolate and soundproof "biografen" (Sal 1) DONE! (link)
3) Convert the rear 2 meters to office and sound barrier DONE! (link)
4) Fill ceiling cavities with 4" broad band bass absorption DONE! (link)
5) Make and install star ceiling acoustic panels (1” OC703 on top of the 4” in cavities. Black GOM) DONE! (LINK) Star ceiling design LINK
6) Make and install sloping side wall acoustic panels. Black GOM. Consider pre-planned wiring for four ATMOS / 3D ceiling speakers, to include at rear wall. DONE! (link)
7) Buy, spray paint black, and install four GIK versifusors on rear part of each sloping side wall. DONE! (link)
8) Make window cover boards, right half will be removable for additional fire escape. DONE! (link)
9) Make front wall vertical corner bass traps (Fluffy Knauf) - Will skip due to subwoofer placement!
10) Make front wall, ceiling-sloping side wall, and front wall-floor bass traps (12” x 12” fluffy Knauf) - Will delay until room is calibrated and the acoustics without treatment are well know!
11) Cover rest of front wall with 2" OC703, and cover all fiberglass with cheap black AT fabric. Will delay until room is calibrated and the acoustics without treatment are well know!
12) Make false wall skeleton and test screen position with white sheet (sloping walls determine how high screen can be mounted - the acoustic panels add to this problem) DONE! (link)
13) Finish false wall skeleton with consolidated mounting hole for AT screen DONE! (link)
14) Set up LCR speakers and subwoofer behind screen wall (3 possible positions for sub – which one to start out with? Cannot really test until acoustic treatment and chairs are in place…) DONE! (link)
15) Mount SMX 110" wide Cinema scope AT screen DONE! (link)
16) Make projector shelf and set up projector. DONE! (link)
17) Test riser height and depth with two (of 😎 Berkline 090 seats. Likely 35-50 cm high (14-20") and 170 cm deep. DONE!
18) Build riser – will serve as broad band bass trap as well and will have two Buttkickers LFE. Include Ethernet switch and 110 V + 220 V wiring, wiring for USB hub, twin mini jack pluck for headset w/mic, and wiring for Buttkickers. Include hidden rope light at riser edge. DONE!
19) Floor – All black oak floor or some black carpet in front of screen? DONE! Black oak floor added!
20) Acoustic treatment of rear wall: 5” OC703 up to 140 cm (55”) w/ Burgundy GOM, three black GIK versifusors above. Consider wiring for rear surround speakers DONE! No OC703 on rear wall, only versifusers.
21) Connect and hang rear surround speakers DONE!
22) Rear vertical corner bass traps (SSC with fluffy Knauf). Burgundy GOM DONE! Only trap in rear right corner, due to roof access door
23) Make special panel to cover hot water radiator (heating) to allow heating, yet discrete/hidden. Still missing!
24) Burgundy GOM treatment on rear half of vertical sidewalls. Empty frames, no OC703. Include pull wires for side surrounds and set up mounting brackets DONE!
25) Make black AT panels for screen wall – use black GOM or black velvet from SmX? (have – is not as AT as GOM…) Still missing! Will use black GOM
26) Make 12 mm OSB panel covered in black GOM with LED spotlights for each side wall where sloping wall meets vertical wall. Still missing!
27) Connect wiring for LED spotlights, including dimmers in 4 zones, two in each side, front and rear half of side wall. DONE!
28) connect amplifiers, surround processor, HTPC, blu-ray, etc. DONE! Major mistake πŸ˜„ Slowed further progress to almost zero
29) Setup sound – test with REW ? DONE! Need more testing
30) Experiment with front half of vertical side walls acoustic treatment. Test with stereo music, Dolby Pro-IIx 7.1 music, as well as 7.1 movies. DONE! Need more testing. Considering black velvet on side wall first 4' from screen, then a versifusor stack
31) all the rest πŸ™‚

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Equipment list (2019):
Denon X4400H receiver, with DTS:X, Atmos and Aurua 3D, has 9 internal amps, but I only use 4 to power rear heights and rear surrounds
Lyngdorf TDAi-2170 amp for LR, bass management for front main L+R and 4 Rythmik subwoofers. Room Perfect EQ used in place of MULTEQ XT32 in receiver.
Denon AVC -A10SE used to power center, front heights and surrounds (X4400H could power them all, but I think spreading the load will provide more control over the speakers)
OPPO BDP-83SE
HTPC w/ Media portal 1
Mediaserver (Norco 4224, with 24 HDD, WHS 2011, 4 DVB-C tuners, Mediaportal TV server, Plex server)
Apple TV4K (iTunes, Netflix, HBO, Viaplay, DR etc.)
Audiovector M3 Signature LCR speakers
MK Sound SS150 L/R side surround speakers
M&K SS150 THX L/R rear surround speakers
MK Sound IW-85 L/R rear heights
Audiovector Mi1 L/R front height speakers
Rythmik subwoofers: 2 x E15HP and 2 x FM8
JVC RS540 (DLA-X790R)
SmX 279 cm (110") wide cinemascope AT screen
IHC light control

Desired upgrades:
- Lyngdorf MP-50 16 ch processor (10000 USD) - Timeframe: 2020

----------------------------------------
Basic layout plan - yes, all layouts and construction plans will be in hand πŸ™‚



-----------------------------------

Acoustic treatment plan:
Ceiling:
4" of OC703 on rear half (over seating area), 4" standard Rockwool on front half. The 4" fill out the cavities between the joists.
In addition, 1" 703 in a 1" wooden frame wrapped in black GOM all over ceiling, by making six 94x160 cm panels. Although ceiling is 182 cm wide, rather than 160 cm, I left the last 22 cm to be covered by the sloping wall panels. One reason was the width of the roll of black GOM - its only 175 cm.
All 1" ceiling panels will have 3 mm rubber spacers between them and the joists, for a bit of decoupling.
I considered adding pond liner to the 1" panels in all areas except FRZ, to make room more live, but decided on wooden floor instead, for same purpose. The 1" panels will have a fiber optic star ceiling installed.

A 1" ceiling panel:


Sloping side walls:
The front half will have 96 mm deep panels with strips of 6" wide and 3" thick OC703 in a 21x96 mm wooden frame, spaced by 5-20 cm (no repetitive pattern). Design is inspired by Bryan Pape. I will make connected sections 94 cm wide and wrapped in black GOM to match ceiling panels.
The rear half will have 4 GIK versifusors on each side, side by side, and oriented vertically. Above and below the versifusors, I will make GOM wrapped panels to match the front half of the sloping wall.

Construction drawing for sloping sidewall acoustic panel:


Layout and construction drawing for sloping sidewall full treatment, including versifusors:


Since I know it's hard to visualize, here is a completed panel, seen from the back side:


Front wall:
Bryan Pape advised 2" OC703 on whole wall + super chunks corner bass traps from floor to sloping ceiling + 6" x 6" on floor/wall corner. Window to be covered in double Β½" OSB w/ green glue. I will make the right half of window cover removable, as an extra emergency exit.
I have decided not to make SCC, but will instead make 30 cm x 80 cm (12x31.5") vertical soffit type corner bass traps using fluffy Knauf + 30 cm x 30 cm (12x12") likewise traps for sloped wall/front wall, front wall/ceiling, and floor/front wall corners. Rest of wall still 2" OC703. All wrapped in black AT fabric (something cheaper than GOM).

This picture shows the difference between a 17x17x24" super chunk triangle corner trap and a 12x12" square one:

UPDATE: reconsidering due to planned test of Lyngdorf TDAi-2170 with two front corner loaded sealed subs. The Room Perfect eq supposingly negates the need for corner bass traps. I can always add them on top of the subs if desired/unhappy. In addition, I will NOT TREAT ENTIRE FRONT WALL initially, but try without treatment, then add for testing purposes.

Rear wall:
5” OC703 up to 140 cm (55”) w/ Burgundy GOM, three black GIK versifusors above. Black GOM wrapped OC703 5" panels for the triangles on the sides of the versifusors, as well as above them (from 200 cm to 230 cm).
I am considering making the OC703 panels with open sides rather than using a 5" wide board, to allow bass to travel horizontally across the panels. Any thoughts on this?
I am also considering using pond liner in the OC703 panels, since their main purpose is bass absorption. The pond liner should per Pape's advice, be mounted floating against the OC703 and will increase bass absorption. Anyone, beside Bryan Pape, that has tried this?
The door will be a challenge - the OC703 panel cannot be too heavy. It will have a versifusor at the top, that will just be mounted with adhesive velcro. Unsure if OC703 panel can be velcro mounted. The door has heavy hinges, but probably not designed for more than the heavy door itself.
UPDATE: reconsidering due to planned test of Lyngdorf TDAi-2170 with two front corner loaded sealed subs. The Room Perfect eq supposingly negates the need for rear wall bass absorption.

Rear vertical corners:
17x17x24" Super chunk corner traps using fluffy Knaub.
The left rear corner trap needs to be removable, since there is an access door to the roof. I am considering hinges that will make it swing 135 deg.
UPDATE: reconsidering due to planned test of Lyngdorf TDAi-2170 with two front corner loaded sealed subs. The Room Perfect eq supposingly negates the need for corner bass traps.

Side walls:
The rear half will probably not have any broadband treatment.
Maybe a few versifusors on the left side between the two rows - the seats will be right up against the left side wall.
The right side will not have room for more than 1" of treatment due to walking passage, but 1" will not be broadband enough, so likely it will just be burgundy GOM on empty 21 mm frames - maybe strips of 21x45 mm wood under GOM for cruder scatter/deflection.
There is a water heated radiator inside the right side wall. I plan on covering it with a panel made of strips of 21x43 and 21x21mm painted black, with burgundy GOM spray-glued on, and cut off between the wooden strips, to allow the hot air to come out.

The front half will be an experiment; I will test different setups when everything else is done:
A) 4’ high 6” OC703 + 1.5’ bare wall, or
B) 4’ 6” OC703 + Β½ Versifusor (1’ high), or
C) mix of 4’ high 6” OC703 and 4’ high versifusor (two stacked) (ABABAB), or
D) only versifusors, or
E) bare wall (baseline - not a final option)

I might make the treatment removable with velcro. Then, if something sounds better for music, and something sounds better for movies, I could switch. Possibly, two channel music might be better with diffusion or a mix of diffusion and absorption - we will see (hear πŸ™‚ )...
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Home theater v.1

When my wife and I bought our house in the fall of 2004, a large attic storage room was available for a HT project.

Initially, we just added two Lazy boys, we already had, later a small coach as well. The projector was a Sanyo Z2 and the screen a Da-Lite Highpower pull down screen, 92" wide cinema scope.

Media sources were a Pioneer laser disc and a HTPC with TheaterTek and Ffdshow post processing filters.

The three Audiovector M3 Signature speakers were powered by a Denon AVC A1SR (AVR-5803). Four Dali 102 served as surround in a 7.1 setup, with a poor yamaha subwoofer.








The sound was somewhat boomy due to carpet and tapestry, but no bass absorbers. However, the sound stage was quite good, probably due to the strips of wood on the side walls - it worked as crude diffusion/ reflection in the FRZ I believe. I did not make it, the room was like that when we bought the house.

However, the room was hot in the summer and cold in the winter - too little insulation. Moreover, I had to turn down the volume at night due to too little soundproofing. In addition, it really needed a different color theme :-D

In the winter of 2008, I decided to clear out the room and start the current project. Unfortunately, it stalled completely when I started a PhD project in 2010...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Step 1: Clear out HT v1. and make an interim setup in game room

This step started in the winter of 2008-2009.
I have no pictures of how the attic room looked when completely empty.

I had tons of sh.. stored in there, it took some time. I had also bought 8 Berkline 090 powered HT recliners, which were stored in there. They had to stay, so they were moved around, as I worked on different parts of the room...

The game room, originally used for Lego, Brio trains, etc., received the two blue Lazy boys, as well as a dark grey couch.

The pictures below are from the fall of 2014, when the Berkline recliners finally left the HT room. My wife generously allowed four of them to be set up in the game room, and the others stored in there. On the pictures, there is one Berkline 090 on top of the couch, as part of testing for riser height and depth :)



 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
STEP 2: Isolate and soundproof "biografen"

The plan was to add 20 cm (8") of standard rockwool to the vertical side walls on the outside of the room, and 10 cm (4") to the inside of the sloping side walls.

Well, I reconsidered for the right side wall, since the wall height only was about 110 cm here, so the floor space could not really be used for anything. Therefore, I isolated on the inside here, which made the width of the room 5" smaller (4" rockwool and DD with GG).
The decision was also taken due to the fact that working on the outside of the room, in the tiny space between the roof and the side wall, would have been pretty hard. On the left side of the room, there is a much larger space on the outside, as there is an eaves that extends the roof 5' from the outer wall, over the terrace below.

On the left wall, I added two additional layers of drywall, with green glue, for soundproofing. The same for the front wall, around the window., and for the ceiling, between the joists.

All drywall had 5 mm (1/5") fo air around the edges, which had sealant added.
I used SilenSeal from the Green Glue company. It was cheap, but it turned out to adhese pretty poor to the drywall: it cracks when temperature shifts make the walls expand and contract.

The ceiling was hard work, with all the sealing needed to be done.

For the sloping side walls, I had a couple of contractors do it. I needed to make sure it ended up being straight and horizontal - which the wall wasn't really before we started. It only had one layer of drywall, with 4" rockwall behind.

At some point, I decided to build a new rear wall - a double wall on independent studs, and with a 40 Db soundproof door in. I moved the wall 2 meters, which gave me approx 1,8 meters for a small office and equipment room. Contractors build the wall for me and installed the door.
The wall is decoupled on all sides, from floor, ceiling and side walls, and sealed with SilenSeal. It is build with 70 mm metal studs, and 2 x 70 mm fiberglass for sound proofing.
The door opening has a double frame, which allows me to install an extra door later on the office side, if need for further soundproofing.

The wall had conduites installed for each side wall, for electricity and surround speakers, and a large conduite for projector, rear speakers and electricity.

Finally, I had another contractor lay a double 5/8"OSB floor with green glue, on top of a 10 mm rubber matt I bought from an Italian company called Isogomma. Underneath the the rubber matt were the original wooden pine boards.
Underneath the pine boards is a large cavity - 8" high - and then the house's original flat roof made out of roofing felt.
Update December 5, 2014: I just accepted an offer from a contractor to fill out the 8" cavity with paper wool http://www.thermofloc.com/en/builders-homeowners/cellulose-insulation/blow-in-insulation

Pictures of the rubbermatt:




Right side wall, sloping side walls and new rear wall done. Still left to be done is ceiling, front wall, and left side wall, as well as the door. You can see the cutout on the right side wall for a new water based heating radiator.



 

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Discussion Starter #6
Step 3: Convert the rear 2 meters to office and sound barrier

The office turned out to be the last being done for four years...

I spend a summer on the office, adding xtra drywall with green glue to original rear wall, and doing plaster work and painting.

The I started working on my PhD in political science in the office.
Nothing was done for the next four years, except yearly upgrades on MediaPortal, building a new mediaserver, and a new living room HTPC.

The office space can be seen here. You can see the double frame at the entrance to the HT on the second picture - it still needs to be sealed :)

 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Step 4: Fill ceiling cavities with 4" broad band bass absorption

After discussing back and forth with Bryan Pape, I decided on filling the cavities between the ceiling joists with 4" broadband absorbing material.
Overhead the two seating rows, as well as the sections next to the front wall and the rear wall, I used OC703, for greatest effect on low freq.

For the three front sections, I used standard Rockwool; the same between the double joists.

The boxes against the left wall is OC703. You can also see the door installed here.


 

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Discussion Starter #8
STEP 5: Make and install star ceiling acoustic panels

Now starts the more fun part - making acoustic panels :)

Let me repeat the plan for the ceiling:

- 4" of OC703 on rear half (over seating area), 4" standard Rockwool on front half. The 4" fill out the cavities between the joists. (step 4)

- In addition, 1" 703 in a 1" wooden frame wrapped in black GOM all over ceiling, by making six 94x160 cm panels. Although ceiling is 182 cm wide, rather than 160 cm, I left the last 22 cm to be covered by the sloping wall panels. One reason was the width of the roll of black GOM - its only 175 cm.

- All 1" ceiling panels will have 3 mm rubber spacers between them and the joists, for a bit of decoupling.

- I considered adding pond liner to the 1" panels in all areas except FRZ, to make room more live, but decided on wooden floor instead, for same purpose.

- The 1" panels will have a fiber optic star ceiling installed.

The first panel I made was a test. It was the first time I tried to wrap a panel in GOM, so I decided to make the panel for the section behind the AT screen first. This panel would also have to LED downlights, and it would have no fiber optic stars.
Therefore, I decided not to fill the panel with 1" OC703, but simply make an empty frame.
I also decided to use my Burgundy GOM, since I fear I won't have enough black GOM. Hence, I would save a little black, as the panel won't be visible. It should still be wrapped in GOM (or some other AT fabric, to avoid the fiberglass fibers from entering the seating area.

Here is a picture of the panel (sorry for the distance):

 

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Very nice progress. I too will be monitoring your build as I have slanted ceiling/wall and am very curious how you built it up.

Are you going to be building any diffusers for your room?

I like the thickness of the acoustic treatments you are applying to the room. 4" of anything is better than those hard surfaces you had previously.

Good luck and keep up the good work.

-sirjaymz
 
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
First ceiling panel with stars

The first ceiling panel with stars to be made was the one closest to the door - the panel next to the rear wall.
It is not as wide as the other six, only 75 cm as opposed to 93.9 cm. For simplicity, the description in this post will treat it as 93.9 cm wide.
It also has two LED downlights, as the only star ceiling panel.

I was considering to make this panel with pond liner between the black GOM fabric and the 1" OC703, but the pond liner arrived too late for that.
Thus, this panel is without pond liner. I will talk more about pond liner in the post for the next panel.

The frame is made out of 27 x 27 mm (1" = 25.4 mm) as well as 21x45 mm pieces.
It worked out quite well using the 27x27 pieces, as the slightly larger (thicker) dimensions than the 1" OC703 panel made it easy to get a good fix of the OC703, while leaving 1-2 mm on the backside for the fiberoptics.
On this particular panel, I also used two 21x95 mm pieces, for mounting the downlights. The hole for the downlights was 75 mm.

The picture below is not from this particular panel (no 21 x 97 mm pieces), but you can (almost) see how I construct the panel using the 21x45 mm pieces at the ends as cross-pieces with two screws and a 27x27mm right next to it with one screw. The 27x27mm and the 21x97mm pieces are 88.3 cm long and are screwed together before attached to the 160.0 cm long 27x27 mm pieces that make the panel’s long sides. Of course, a 27 x 97 or 27 x 72 mm would have been much easier to use at the short ends of the panel, but such a measure is not available in Denmark.
I align the 27x27 mm and the 21x45 mm on the GOM side (the visible side), and the 27x27 mm inward towards the first OC703 strip.
The OC703 strips on the panels are 12” x 88.4 cm, which gives me two strips per 2’x4’ OC703 panel and a about 1’x2’ of leftover, saved for other use later. They are cut to length of 88.4 cm for a tight fit in the wooden panel's 88.3 mm width.
A 27x27 mm piece with one screw is attached just short of 12” further down the long side of the panel. This makes the space for the OC703 strip about 1.0-1.5 mm shorter on each side than the size of the OC703 strip, for a tight fit.



No picture available of the backside of the finished panel.
The finished panel, mounted in the ceiling, can be seen below.

Originally, I thought I would attach the ceiling panels with strong 3M velcro. However, that turned out not to be possible - it was not strong enough with the four pieces of 4" velcro I added to each long side. Maybe, if I had added velcro along the full length of the panel, but that would simply be way too expensive.
I wanted the panel to be removable for future access to wiring, ceiling speakers, new mounting position for projector, etc.

In the end, I used a compressor nail gun, with small (1 mm) 2" nails.
With theater lighting, they cannot be seen in the GOM fabric.
I added 6 pieces of 3 mm rubber pads on each long side, to decouple the panel a bit from the joists, and to make a little extra room for the fiber optic cables.

 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Star ceiling design

Before I go on and show the next ceiling panel, let me describe how I designed the fiber optic star ceiling.
I basically copied Ruben's (SmX) method, except I didn't use a 1/4" MDF for the frontside, since I wanted my whole ceiling to be a broadband absorber. Ruben had a few FRZ panels with thin 1" OC703 and the MDF board on the backside of the OC703, but I did not want such thin acoustic panels - it is an outdated HT acoustic design, I believe.

Consequently, I was curious whether I could make my ceiling panels rigid enough and avoid sagging of the OC703 material without the MDF when the fiber optics were added, and whether the fiberoptics would stay in place with no MDF to hot glue them to, like Ruben did.

As it turned out, I was not a problem :)

I designed the star ceiling by using a computer program for the star sky (stellarium-0.9.0).
I picked the southern night sky on my birthday, January 22, in the town I live in, Kolding in Denmark.

This is how the whole ceiling will look. Two side-by-side black rectangles represent a ceiling panel, for a total of six panels:



I used a 48 fiber cable, with 4 1.5 mm, 10 1.0 mm, and 34 0.75 mm fibers. I believe Ruben used only 0.75 mm fibers, but I wanted the larger stars to be larger :)
Below is a picture of ceiling panel one star map. I marked the 4 largest stars with red, the 10 medium with green and the rest with black. Each of the 6 ceiling sections will have their own 48 fiber cable, for a total of 288 stars.
On some star sky sections not all the smallest stars will have a fiber, but it turned out to be pretty close to 48 on all 6 sections.
The large grey circles are the markings for the cutout for the two LED down lights.



Here is panel 2:



And here is the projected picture (the star map is put in a power point and exported as PDF, then projected on the ceiling panel complete with OC703 and wrapped in black GOM. The reflections on this particular panel is larger due to the pond liner used underneath the GOM (see next post). I just a small philips type screwdriver to mark the star. On the backside, the hole is visible in the OC703, and light from the projector can be seen through the hole. I then put a fiber through the hole from the backside. See next post for backside of panel with fibers in place.



And here is a picture of panel 1 and 2, with the stars on. See if you can recognize the star map :) Top is panel 1, bottom panel 2. The ceiling continues below this picture.

 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Construction of star ceiling panel 2

The second panel, which will be right over the seats of the second row, has a pond liner cut to about 88.5 cm x 146 cm , just touching the wooden inner edges of the frame. The pond liner should be mounted floating, i.e. no stables.

The pond liner idea is Bryan Pape's. It serves two purposes: 1) It reflects the highs, making the room more lively. 2) It adds to bass absorption.

Bryan said to minimize the wooden slats across the panel to make the pond liner float as much as possible. Thus, for this panel, I designed it for 24" (2') wide OC703 panels, and 88.3 cm long.
The ceiling panel's total width without GOM, with the 27 mm pieces for the long sides, is then 93.7 cm and about 93.8 - 93.9 cm with GOM.

Since people in the seats will serve as bass absorbers, and possibly as diffusors as well (?), I decided no need for high freq absorption above the seats. I like a lively room, and I will also be playing music.

As it turned out, the pond liner smells a bit, even after a while. In addition, inserting the fiber optics through the pond liner was a b.tch. Last, I thought the 24" wide OC703 panels fit less tight and solid than the 12" strips from the first panel - I was afraid it might sag in the middle over time, rigid or not.
Therefore, this is my one and only ceiling panel with pond liner...

Here is a picture of the backside, finished, with fiber optics. You can see how I had to make a recess on both sides to make room for the fiberoptic cable from this panel, as well as the cable from panel 1. Consequently, I cut the narrow center piece of OC703 in half height, i.e. Β½", to make room for the cable run from panel 1.


Another angle:



The width of the panels has been calculated as to make each junction between two panels be right at a joist. It had to be exact, as each joist only is 5 cm (2") wide). 75 cm for the first and 93.9 cm for the rest ended up working quite well. The width without GOM was 93.7 cm and the GOM added about 1-1.5 mm. I allow 0.5-1 mm for mounting flexibility. You can see the six 3 mm rubber pads attached to the joists for decoupling and spacing on the picture of the ceiling before mounting panel 2:



And after mounting:

 

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Discussion Starter #14
If you zoom in on this picture, you can see I added downlight casings to the panel. The casings were mounted on a 21 x 97 mm cross board that on all the other panels is replaced by a 27 x 27 mm piece. The cutout hole for the casing was 75 mm.
I cut out a 8 x 8" hole in the OC703 between the joists, per instructions from the casing manufacture ( for heat dissemination). I use 220 V GU10 type LEDs.

 

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Discussion Starter #15
Construction of star ceiling panel 3-6

The last 4 panels were constructed identically (except of course the position of the stars).

Here follows pictures of the panel construction. I constructed each wooden frame to hold four 12" wide 1" OC703 strips, plus a smaller Β½" strip in the middle to make room for the fiber optic cables from the adjacent panels (the cables all end at the front wall). No pond liner was used.





And the finished ceiling:

 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
STEP 6: Make and install sloping side wall acoustic panels

PLAN:
The front half of the room will have 96 mm deep panels with strips of 6" wide and 2-3" thick OC703 in a 21x96 mm wooden frame, spaced by 5-20 cm (no repetitive pattern). Design is inspired by Bryan Pape. I will make sections 94 cm wide that have 3 frames of 6" OC703 as well as space between them, all in one black GOM-wrapped panel, to match the width of the ceiling panels.

The rear half will have 4 black-painted GIK versifusors on each side wall, side by side, and oriented vertically. Above and below the versifusors, I will make GOM wrapped panels to match the front half of the sloping wall. The ones above will also have 2" OC703, as they are in the side wall/ceiling corner.

Panel 1:
Here is a picture of the first panel, before inserting the OC703 and wrapping in GOM. Also missing are three pieces of wood to seal the sections that will hold OC703, at the angled top. I decided to seal each OC703 section completely on all four sides, while the empty sections will be somewhat open at the top and bottom ends, with only a 94 cm long 21x45 mm piece that holds alle the subpanels together and makes it a single large panel that can have GOM frabric wrapped around it.
The panel is somewhat heavy and I have concerns about attaching it to the single layer drywall on the side wall. I will only be able to have four screws hit the horizontal studs. I will add additional screws that will only attach to the drywall itself... In addition, I will use 1 mm 2" nails at the top, where they attach to the joists.


Here is a picture of the backside of the first finished panel, here you can see how the three sections with OC703 now are sealed on all four sides:


Here is a picture of the mounted panel, seen from below. You can see two angled screws in the OC703 section that attach it to the drywall, here with no stud behind it. You can also see the pink cord used to align all the panels horizonally.


Here is a picture of the mounted panel from the side. Here you can see three angled screws into the drywall, one of them hits a stud, another one further up does as wall. You can see it is not completely flat against the wall, due to alignment with the ceiling panel (see next picture for this). Twist you head 40 degrees to the left to align with reality :)


The mounted panel seen from the future position of second row of seats. The cardboard box behind it is a model for an ATMOS speaker:


The last picture shows the mounting and alignment at the top, where it meets the ceiling panel. As can be seen, I have also prepared for wirering for ceiling speakers. More on this in the next post. Of course, despite planning for this, I forget it during construction and had to remove the three top pieces of wood on the OC703 sections and make room for the tube :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Sloped wall panel 2:

Here is a picture of the second panel before GOM. I started to use leftover strips of OC703, to minimize the waste. I also used a 2" and a 1" strip, for a total of 3".


Here is a picture of the backside of the second panel, which I decided to put GOM on the backside of the OC703 sections as well, to incapsulate the OC703 completely. As it turns out, this became the only section to have this, as I reckoned I wouldn't have enough GOM if I did this on all the panels. I should probably have gone out and bought some cheap muslin fabric for the backsides, but never got around to it. I might still do so for the last two panels.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Sloped Wall Panel 3 and 4

These panels have been prepared for ATMOS/DTS X speakers here. Therefore, I divided the panels into two parts, with the top part mounted with velcro and sized to hold a MK IW-85 or 95. An IW-150 will require a redesign. Alternatively, a MK S150T/SS150Thx can be mounted on top of the removable top panel. Wiring is prepared.

Here is the lower panel seen from the backside:


And the front side, GOM covered:


Here is the top panel:


And here is a lower and top panel mounted in the right side of the room, and a lower panel in the left side:
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
STEP 7: Buy, paint black, and install four GIK versifusors on rear part of each sloping side wall.

I have bought 16 GIK Versifusors, which are a 13-root QRD diffuser made out of polystyrene. They are sold in packs of four 2'x2' (60 x 60 cm) panels, and are untreated.
They are very cheap compared to other QRD diffusors, but do not look very attractive.
However, painted black and added next to my black GOM panels, in a darkened HT room, you cannot see they are made out of polystyrene.
I am not aware whether they sound differently than one's made out of wood, but they likely sound better than bare drywall.

I have added them in the rear half of the room, as seen below. They are mounted with 3M adhesive velcro.
I have 5 panels left, which will likely be used somewhere on side walls in the front half of the room.





I will add black GOM covered panels below and above for finish. The panels above will also serve as potential positions of ATMOS/DTS:X ceiling speakers. I have pre-wired.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
STEP 16: Make projector shelf and set up projector &
part of STEP 20: Acoustic treatment of rear wall: three black GIK versifusors from 150 cm and up


Sorry - breaking the order of the plan :-D
It made sense to me to add the rear wall versifusors together with the sloped sidewall ones. I then realized I had to make the projector shelf first.

I have tried to decouple the shelf a bit by adding 3 mm rubber pads between the shelf and the shelf brackets, and between the shelf brackets and the wall.




The shelf itself is a 16 mm solid oak shelf painted black.
I am considering adding a 10 mm rubber decoupling matt and a 10 mm MDF board on top of that, to avoid low frequency vibrations. I will probably wait and see if there is a problem.

I then cut out slots on the back of the versifusor panel that will go in front of the brackets. In addition, the panel was shortened 10 cm in length. I made sure there was a small air gap between the brackets and the backside of the panel, to minimize vibrations.

These pictures show the versifusors mounted on the rear wall. They are mounted with 3M adhesive velcro.


 
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