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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You know how you measure each primary at end point of a D65 color graph?

How does that correlate to NTSC/ATSC colors and how does that related to

bits? I saw 10bit LCD have a major color banding against a 8bit LCD. This thing

confuses me. I am trying to figure this mess out.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by like.no.other. /forum/post/17016157


You know how you measure each primary at end point of a D65 color graph?

No I'm not actually sure exactly what yo mean.

Quote:
Originally Posted by like.no.other. /forum/post/17016157


How does that correlate to NTSC/ATSC colors and how does that related to

bits?

ATSC uses the rec.709 color gamut to define it's RGB primaries

NTSC uses SMTP-E primaries

Both use D65 as the white point

Quote:
Originally Posted by like.no.other. /forum/post/17016157


I saw 10bit LCD have a major color banding against a 8bit LCD. This thing

confuses me. I am trying to figure this mess out.

Bit depth has no direct effect on color gamut. The primaries are defined by the physical characteristics of the display.


This is what the gamut looks like



The bit depth just changes how many steps each primary has between off and on (256 for 8 bit, 1024 for 10 bit). There are good TV's and bad TV's and things like more bit depth won't make a bad TV good. That said if both TV's were PROPERLY calibrated I'd be shocked if the 10bit panel ended up showing more banding with the same image.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by sotti /forum/post/17017489


No I'm not actually sure exactly what yo mean.



ATSC uses the rec.709 color gamut to define it's RGB primaries

NTSC uses SMTP-E primaries

Both use D65 as the white point



Bit depth has no direct effect on color gamut. The primaries are defined by the physical characteristics of the display.


This is what the gamut looks like



The bit depth just changes how many steps each primary has between off and on (256 for 8 bit, 1024 for 10 bit). There are good TV's and bad TV's and things like more bit depth won't make a bad TV good. That said if both TV's were PROPERLY calibrated I'd be shocked if the 10bit panel ended up showing more banding with the same image.

Thanks! I was so confused that I didn't even know how to put that in writing.

Now it's less blurry to me, I appreciate it!



I was asking because I see this brochures that say 70% NTSC colors but the

primaries are accurate therefore going by the chart, it wouldn't reach that

primary point because the color gamut traingle isn't wide enough. Get that?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by like.no.other. /forum/post/17017852


Thanks! I was so confused that I didn't even know how to put that in writing.

Now it's less blurry to me, I appreciate it!



I was asking because I see this brochures that say 70% NTSC colors but the

primaries are accurate therefore going by the chart, it wouldn't reach that

primary point because the color gamut traingle isn't wide enough. Get that?

I think there is quite a bit of confusion going on with what's where. The original NTSC primaries where never really used. So they moved to SMTP-E primaries in the 70s since everyone was only using like 70% of the NTSC gamut because Green was much closer in.


So 70% is often very close to rec.709 or SMTP-E so even if you have a set that does 100% hopefully you'll have a Color management system as well so you can reel green back to where it is suppose to be.
 
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