AVS Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I have been around audio electronics my whole life, but speaker wiring still confuses me. I have an emotive mps-2 mated with paradigm studio 100 v3's along with the matched cc and surrounds. I chose to biwire all them. I am wondering what series or parallel will do for me? Does it change impedance from 8 to 4? How would this change the sound? If anyone can educate me on this I would be most appreciative.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,587 Posts
IDK what you are asking. If you removed the jumpers on the speakers, the high and low pass sections of the crossover are, by definition, in parallel. There's not a way to run them in series unless you yank out the crossovers and rewire them. Putting them in series would result, I'm pretty sure, in passing the high passed signal through the low pass section of the crossover, and vice versa, resulting in something approaching complete elimination of the whole signal to both drivers. You'd get a fair amount of the octave or so around the crossover point, and not much else . . .


If the jumpers are still in place, it's just like connecting the output of one amp to the output of the other amp, which is a recipe for destruction of amps . . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for the reply. So let me ask another question, going from my amp to the speaker it is 8 ohms. How do you create it into 4 or 2 ohms? Does making it into a lower impedance make the speaker sound different?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,931 Posts
You cannot change the impedance of a single speaker. Bi-wiring separates the wires to the HF and LF sections, it does not change the impedance. Instead of using a single wire with the HF and LF sections connected at the speaker terminals, you connect the wires at the amplifier. Or leave the jumpers on the speakers in place, the sound will be the same unless you have some very strange setup. The impedance is not changed either way.



If you had two separate speakers and wired them in series you would double their impedance (load) to the amp. Put in parallel you would halve the impedance to the amp. The sound probably would not change significantly either way. Impedance is but one of numerous variables in speaker design.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,587 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by riney  /t/1520284/biwire-or-series-or-parallel-speaker-wiring#post_24422136


Thank you for the reply. So let me ask another question, going from my amp to the speaker it is 8 ohms. How do you create it into 4 or 2 ohms? Does making it into a lower impedance make the speaker sound different?

the impedance on each side of the crossover is made up of the impedance of the driver(s) (tweeter, woofer) and the impedance presented by the crossover. You can't change it without changing the driver or the crossover so it's not worth worrying about. I suppose that theoretically a speaker that has an 8 ohm impedance with both halves of its parallel crossover connected might be 16 ohms on each side, resulting in an 8 ohm overall impedance, but it's unlikely that real life is exactly like that. But it still looks like 8 ohms to the amp because the two halves of the crossover are still wired in parallel just exactly like they are with the jumper in place and the speaker wire connected only to one side of the crossover. You just have a longer jumper.


Truly, biwiring (and I had speakers biwired for a long time) just doesn't do anything real. or more precisely, if it does, it's because it results in lowering the resistance of the speaker wires, and you could have the same effect by increasing the size of a single run. (This only becomes relevant in unusual circumstances where the amp's output impedance is so high that, what, an ohm at the very most of speaker wire resistance changes the interaction between the amp and the speaker).
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,420 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by JHAz  /t/1520284/biwire-or-series-or-parallel-speaker-wiring#post_24422229



Truly, biwiring (and I had speakers biwired for a long time) just doesn't do anything real.

Hold that thought!

Quote:
or more precisely, if it does, it's because it results in lowering the resistance of the speaker wires,

Doesn't happen because the speaker ends of the wires are isolated from each other.


For there to be any such benefit to occur the wires would have to be connected to each other at both ends - in a true parallel combination.


That's why Tom Nousaine of S&V calls it "Buy wire" because other than buying twice as much wire and benefitting the dealer, there's no benefit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,846 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonH50  /t/1520284/biwire-or-series-or-parallel-speaker-wiring#post_24422216


If you had two separate speakers and wired them in series you would double their impedance (load) to the amp. Put in parallel you would halve the impedance to the amp.

Provided the speakers in question have the same impedance, yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,931 Posts
Yes, given the level of questioning I decided it wasn't worth it to explain further.


Rtotal_parallel = 1 / (1/R1 + 1/R2 + ...)
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top