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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
'Morning all, need some advice.

After much research, my bud finally got his 2 channel system up:


Paradigm 100's v2

Rotel RB-1080 amp (200w x2)

Rotel RC-1090 Pre

Transparent interconnects

Transparent Bi-wired speaker cable


He's been having a helluva time with fuses, blowing them once a month.

He went and exchanged the amp for a new 1080, but the problem still persists.

Its usually the left one that blows.

He's getting tired of pulling off the cover and replacing these fuses.

We're gonna go over to radioshack and try to pick up some more for a party he's throwing next weekend.


any ideas?

Could bad speaker cables do this?

Bad speakers?

Wrong fuses? (he's buying 'fast burn' fuses, thats correct right?)


His system seems well ventilated. (In a cool basement with open style rack).

This problem has been constant even with the new additions of Transparent cables.

It's an older house so the other thing we're considering is crappy power.

might that do it?

he has a relatively up to date power bar, nothing like the monster power filters, but good enough we assumed.


He went and exchanged the amp, but its still happening, so now i'm out of advice for him.

Getting closer though.

Can anyone help me nail this *****?


regards,

L.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Addendum..

apologies, he says that its the right fuse that blows consistenly.

Also i asked him if he ever tried switching the speaker cables.

He replied, yes, and that its STILL that same fuse that blows.

getting closer...
 

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Put an electrical tester on it to tell if it has been wired correctly. ie a current on the common ground. If it is then check what else is on that circuit. It may be causing an overload or brownout which blows the fuse.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by 9volt
has he tried switching speakers?
This is a fantastic idea. That's what I'd do... Switch the inputs L/R and then switch the speaker cables L/R... Quick and dirty test (well, not if it takes a month to blow hehe), but it would let you divide the range of problems quite significantly by triage...


If you switch the inputs/outputs, and the problem still follows the right channel only, I would suspect possible power issues (spikes more likely than 'dirty' power), or something else faulty electrically in the room. (Possibly something not grounded properly, and dumping voltage to the Rotel amp's chassis through the metal rack...something silly like that. My rotel RMB-1075 does not have a grounded plug, so it is probably somewhat susceptible to things of this nature. I haven't used an RB-1080, but I suspect the design is similar on the power supply end... So this could be a possibility...)


Another interesting, though time consuming, thing you can do is build a circuit that you can hook up to a serial port on a computer that will monitor the wattage on the power line to see if there are any serious faults there. One big tipoff would be if you all of the sudden started sucking down 100kW, heh. You might also be able to set something up to monitor the voltage on the line as well, so that you can tell if you're wattage figure is inline with a spike (100kW at 115v would be nearly 900 amps, I'm sure that'd fry most anything...but if the voltage went insanely high as well, that might tell you something...) I've never done this myself, but a buddy of mine (who also runs a company building MP3 players of his own design) did this at one point to investigate a similar fuse-blowing issue. Check out his page on this at: http://www.seanadams.com/pge/


If you switch the inputs/outputs, and the problem follows the speaker (i.e. the left channel blows instead of the right channel), then you probably have a serious impedance or clipping issue that you'd likely need to investigate before any real damage occurs... (I wouldn't consider a fuse blowing to be real damage. The fuse is there specifically to prevent real damage from occurring anyway...)


It's possible that you may just need a power conditioner, however, I would not jump to that conclusion unless you have one that you can borrow for free for a while. I'm still not convinced that power conditioners are anything more than a placebo for audiophiles that ... hear better when their wallets are lighter. :)
 
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