AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 175 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a WHS and I want to be able to store all my Blu-Ray movies on it and play those back on any TV in my residence. I have been reading various sources on how this is done and it seems there are dozens of combinations on how to do this. I feel like my head is going to explode reading them all. There's MKV, BDMV, ISO. Then there are all sorts of ways to rip, and play back these files. My goal is to be as forward looking as possible at this stage of the game. Information from even 3 months ago seems outdated in cases where different software programs have gained and lost capabilities (PDVD 9).




1. I would like no loss in quality whatsoever in video or audio. I do not believe in transcoding a lossy format.


2. While I would like compatibility with PS3 and XBox 360, it's clear to me that currently trying to use those players is a waste of time since it requires transcoding or some degradation somewhere due to their manufacturer's closed-minded policies. However they are convenient, cheap devices with decent interfaces. So I would like to pick a method that leaves me open to the day when those players may get updates to play these rips. It may never happen and I'm fully prepared for that.


3. Given the above I have an HTPC ready to go and a WHS also ready to go and with plenty of free space. I would like the option to use something like the Asus O Play or WD Media Player, but my first player will be an HTPC with which I will work out the initial kinks.


4. I wish to preserve menus, special features, audio at full lossless quality.






I hear arguments for formats like MKV, ISO, BDMV and I really don't know the best way. It would seem that ISO is the way to go since that is the actual disc image and if in the future things change I could always use that ISO to convert to something else that works better for my purpose. Then I read here on AVSForum that going with ISO for some reason requires audio quality loss on playback. I am confused. BDMV seems like a good option and I understand the only software to play it is TMT3 Platinum. MKV is favored by some but I believe that causes a loss of menus and features.




I'm really confused right now and I wonder which strategy allows me to preserve as much as possible and allow for possible current or future use of cheaper media extenders like the WD media player or the Asus or Seagate or Popcorn Hour. If it makes life easier I could do without menus and such. But I need all audio formats.




I understand if I go the ISO route the ISO must be mounted. How long does this take?





My player will be an HTPC running a Core i7 at 4.1GHz and my WHS is Core 2 Duo at 3.2 Ghz and everything will be via Gigabit Ethernet. At some point I might move the WHS to a dedicated 5GHz Wireless-N bridge. I know that bridge can saturate a 100Mbps Ethernet link - I have tested it.




I am getting my BD-drive tomorrow and I have been waiting long to do this but I wanted to do it right the first time. I don't want to have to re-rip my library in the future if possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
1) Anydvd or DVDFab

2) ISO format = Bitstreaming, VCD 5 seconds or so for mounting and launching

3) HTPC/WDTV Live

4) 40-50GB per movie so be prepared to build a lot of storage.

5) Stick to wired Gigabit whenever and wherever you can

6) TMT3/PDVD9/MPC-HC are a few good choices for player combined with MediaBrowser or MyMovies and you are set.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
350 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by sxr71 /forum/post/18200292



1. I would like no loss in quality whatsoever in video or audio. I do not believe in transcoding a lossy format.

Rip to an MKV and convert the audio to lossless flac. You'll save a bit of space and keep the lossless sound. No need to transcode the video if you have a powerfull enough PC to play them back or can use DXVA acceleration.


2. While I would like compatibility with PS3 and XBox 360, it's clear to me that currently trying to use those players is a waste of time since it requires transcoding or some degradation somewhere due to their manufacturer's closed-minded policies. However they are convenient, cheap devices with decent interfaces. So I would like to pick a method that leaves me open to the day when those players may get updates to play these rips. It may never happen and I'm fully prepared for that.

PS3 Media Serve takes care of the streaming to your PS3. Yes it is trancoded on the fly but believe me I never seen the difference on my 106" screen. But if you want to keep it native you could buy a Western Digital Live media extender. It plays 1080p mkv nativelly.


3. Given the above I have an HTPC ready to go and a WHS also ready to go and with plenty of free space. I would like the option to use something like the Asus O Play or WD Media Player, but my first player will be an HTPC with which I will work out the initial kinks.

Then you don't really have any problem playin MKVs with Flac audio. Just use WMC with Media Browser or XBMC or Media Portal as a frontend and you are set to go.


4. I wish to preserve menus, special features, audio at full lossless quality.

Then your only choice is either rip to a folder structure or to an ISO. While MKV with flac preserves the video and audio you lose the menu and special feature, but then again, unless it is to render your disk kid proof, why would you store the extra and menu on your server and waste space for something you'll only watch once or twice if ever when you could just pull out the disk to do that when the need arise.


I hear arguments for formats like MKV, ISO, BDMV and I really don't know the best way. It would seem that ISO is the way to go since that is the actual disc image and if in the future things change I could always use that ISO to convert to something else that works better for my purpose. Then I read here on AVSForum that going with ISO for some reason requires audio quality loss on playback. I am confused. BDMV seems like a good option and I understand the only software to play it is TMT3 Platinum. MKV is favored by some but I believe that causes a loss of menus and features.


I'm really confused right now and I wonder which strategy allows me to preserve as much as possible and allow for possible current or future use of cheaper media extenders like the WD media player or the Asus or Seagate or Popcorn Hour. If it makes life easier I could do without menus and such. But I need all audio formats.


I understand if I go the ISO route the ISO must be mounted. How long does this take?

With VirtualCloneDrive it is quasi immediate, maybe a second or two.



My player will be an HTPC running a Core i7 at 4.1GHz and my WHS is Core 2 Duo at 3.2 Ghz and everything will be via Gigabit Ethernet. At some point I might move the WHS to a dedicated 5GHz Wireless-N bridge. I know that bridge can saturate a 100Mbps Ethernet link - I have tested it.

You can play anything with that kind of horsepower. My system is connected via 1gig routers and I never had any hickup. But then again, I'm wired, not wireless.



I am getting my BD-drive tomorrow and I have been waiting long to do this but I wanted to do it right the first time. I don't want to have to re-rip my library in the future if possible.

Myself I went the MKV route and I'm quite please with the result. I'm not a number crunching or stat munching kind of guy. For me the end result count more then the number on a sheet of paper and for me my MKV when put beside the original look and sound the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,807 Posts
The problem with bluray iso is the space. If you have any number of discs say 100 discs you are talking 5-6 TB already. Thats not many movies and an enourmous amount of space. And of course you will probably have other stuff on there. The question is how many discs are you talking and what you are willing to spend. For most people its not worth the cost trying to do full iso rips of bluray when you can take a tiny hit in looks by compressing but then you have to consider the time it takes to do the compression. So you get many more movies and much less space with a tiny loss with compression or fill up a huge array quick with lossless. Seems a crazy expense trying to fit a few hundred lossless blurays on an array. Say you had 300 blurays thats 15TB or more...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you everyone. I think I will start with ISO and then if I desire switch to MKV since I could do that anytime in the future from the ISOs.


As for space, yes it could get expensive but I'm prepared for it since I have 9TB on my WHS now and with 2 Sans Digital Enclosures I could add 16TB to that and get about 25TB in total. Right now I don't own many Blu-Ray discs but as I increase my library I would need to invest in new HDDs.


I am quite interested in the WDTV Live since it's just a $100. But for now I will use my main PC as my HTPC and take it forward as things develop.


Thanks for all your help and I'm looking forward to getting my hands on my first Blu-Ray drive today!


Currently I use a PS3 via my old Mits HD-1000u projected at 120". It's only 720p but its due for an upgrade. Can't believe after 3 years it works with its original bulb.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts
Why ISO and not Blu-Ray folders? I have all of my Blu-Ray ripped to folders and I find it much easier to work with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by BigZAJ /forum/post/18204400


Why ISO and not Blu-Ray folders? I have all of my Blu-Ray ripped to folders and I find it much easier to work with.

I'm curious about this too... can you bitstream from a folder or does it have to be an ISO?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by t30t28t16t12 /forum/post/18200575


1) Anydvd or DVDFab
1.5) ClownBD to reduce size of the iso, while retaining the exact audio & video stream of your choice (basically, only keep best quality audio/video & remove the rest of the junk)
Quote:
Originally Posted by t30t28t16t12 /forum/post/18200575


2) ISO format = Bitstreaming, VCD 5 seconds or so for mounting and launching

3) HTPC/WDTV Live

4) 40-50GB per movie so be prepared to build a lot of storage.

5) Stick to wired Gigabit whenever and wherever you can

6) TMT3/PDVD9/MPC-HC are a few good choices for player combined with MediaBrowser or MyMovies and you are set.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
can you make an iso out of clownbd that contains only audio/video?

how does a player handle this? does the movie just start playing?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by woody777 /forum/post/18204459


I'm curious about this too... can you bitstream from a folder or does it have to be an ISO?

I have folders and as of last night I have bitstreaming as well. Using an ATI 5570 and TMT3.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
525 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by daninfamous /forum/post/18204668


can you make an iso out of clownbd that contains only audio/video?

how does a player handle this? does the movie just start playing?

I have played with Clown, although I'm still a fan of having a navigable menu (mainly for scene selection). To answer your question yes the main feature just starts playing.


I will say I used ClownBD to reduce District 9 from 40gig to 22.5gig.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by daninfamous /forum/post/18204668


can you make an iso out of clownbd that contains only audio/video?

how does a player handle this? does the movie just start playing?

I use Clown. It's super flexible and will basically do whatever you tell it to. I rip to Blu-Ray folders and pull out just the main movie, main soundtrack and any forced subs.


I did a few like that to ISOs and they worked great. I launch them from MediaBrowser in 7MC and play with TMT3. I mounted them with VCD. In the MediaBrowser setup you point to your mounting software and you can set an external player for any media content. It was quite seamless.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
I use ToNMT to strip the "feature film" streams out of the bluray folders and remuxed into a single TS file that is loss-less but cuts out all the crap and the file doesn't have to be mounted - its playable by VLC, WMC, or just about any set-top box. The program can be downloaded here (***. networkedmediatank.com/showthread.php?tid=1786 ) and was created for users of the Popcorn Hour and other NMT devices. It has a nice UI and allows you to pull the audio track you want. This cuts the size of most BD's quite a bit. Aside from a few tricky titles it's always worked perfectly for me when coupled with AnyDVD HD (which runs in the background).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by ogormask /forum/post/18203429


The problem with bluray iso is the space. If you have any number of discs say 100 discs you are talking 5-6 TB already. Thats not many movies and an enourmous amount of space. And of course you will probably have other stuff on there. The question is how many discs are you talking and what you are willing to spend. For most people its not worth the cost trying to do full iso rips of bluray when you can take a tiny hit in looks by compressing but then you have to consider the time it takes to do the compression. So you get many more movies and much less space with a tiny loss with compression or fill up a huge array quick with lossless. Seems a crazy expense trying to fit a few hundred lossless blurays on an array. Say you had 300 blurays thats 15TB or more...

I don't know man - 300 BluRays is a healthy chunk of change. Even if you got them at a bargain price of $15-$20/ea, that's a lot of money spent on just movies, which means you take your movies pretty seriously. You can grab a 2TB drive for $170. Throw a few in a chassis and you are good to go. Or do the cheap NAS route (Dlink DNS-323). You don't need a big fancy array. Besides, what's a few hundred extra bucks when you've already spent several thousand on your library?


Plus, the time it takes to encode these things is just insane. You'd need a small data center to manage that workflow and chew thru it all. You can use TSMuxer and suck the movie off the disc to an M2TS in about 15 minutes. Re-encoding is like 15 hours if all you've got is a basic HTPC.



I say take the hit on storage - every time you buy a BluRay, mentally tack on another $5 in storage overhead for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts
Man you guys are using way to much space for a Blu-ray ripping and storage. Blus can be converted easily to a 8-12GB 1080p mkv without video or audio loss. Take away the special features and menus and save yourselves some space. Use h264 for video and extract the primary audio streams to mkv. So far i've converted 10 out 150 Blu-rays out my collection and the results are the same or even better as the original disk. The difference is not noticable by the normal 20/20 human eye . I currently have 110" carada Screen with a Epson 1080UB projector for testing this kind of stuff and it all looks and sounds the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,652 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by theshadow1234 /forum/post/18205154


Man you guys are using way to much space for a Blu-ray ripping and storage. Blus can be converted easily to a 8-12GB 1080p mkv without video or audio loss.


Sorry, but that's a load of crap and one's own opinion. You absolutely lose video quality when compressing. The question is, does it make a difference to your eyes with your equipment. Many of us can tell the difference and for the amount of little compression we'd be willing to accept, it would be almost the same size and take 8+ hours just to convert one movie. Isn't worth it in the end with the price of storage these days.


It is worth striping the menus/previews/special features.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
I've started ripping to 720p (2-6gb) instead of 1080p (20-40gb) and keeping the HD audio and/or ac3 track. To me the space saving is worth more than the loss of video quality (very small to my eye; wife and kids don't care) to the number of times I may actually rewatch every movie. If watching in 1080p is needed, I just pull the disc from the shelf (always watch first time from disc anyways).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
308 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrwalte /forum/post/18205280


You absolutely lose video quality when compressing. .

You must say what you feel is right of course. I hope you have something that proves to all of us the above opinion. If your opinion is true then someone is definately doing something wrong during the encoding process.


Again 1080P BLu-ray to 1080P MKV = No Loss and Small File Size depending on the tools used and the preferences set by the person encoding.
 
1 - 20 of 175 Posts
Top