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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Yes! It's here. Live streaming now. 12K acquisition and BRAW. Said to have BMD designed sensor targeted specially for BRAW.
12288 horz resolution, S-35 sensor, Native ISO 800, PL Lens mount.

Why 12K? Trying to address the highest end work, supersampled 8K. Lower resolutions selectable in camera, "in the sensor" because the sensor resolution is symetrical. No crops. 12K, 8K, 4K.
60fps in 12K, 8K 110 fps.

900 MB/S recording on simultaneous dual card. BRAW handles the details, put both cards in same folder, done.

Massively high BRAW playback performance, 12K on laptop possible, as easy as UHD. Can record 12K to USB-C flash drive, 432 minutes. Resolve can sync multiple cam 12K. Demonstrated syncing (9) 12K cameras on MacBook Pro.

12K demo clips available for download at BMD, for Resolve Studio.

Shipping in two weeks,

$9,995.

Edit:

Super high speed M.2 SSD drive recorder will be available in a few weeks, $395, mounts on back of camera, V-Lock battery mounts on the recorder.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
BM's site does not show anything remotely close to that number. Its highest is 578 MB/s. Did you mean 900 Mb/s ?
900 MB/S

Recorded across (2) cards simultaneously. You gather the files from each, put them into the same folder and Resolve will merge them into one recorded at 7200 Mb/s.

Edit:

If one of the cards fails, there is enough information on the other to reconstruct a a complete 4K file. BRAW includes new compression option of 18:1, complement to 5:1, 8:1, 12:1.

The CFA has equal number of G,R,B filters, not the traditional 2:1:1 bayer.
 

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The crowd here won't have much interest in 12K. Can't edit 8K on most computers and many have trouble with 4K60p.
 

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I saw this beast on FB earlier. As you can tell by my profile pic, one could say I'm invested in BM a bit and this made my mouth water.
I'm really curious about the low light performance, which wasn't really the strength of the Ursa lineup.
My Ursa already records at 500MB/s at 4k RAW 1:1, 12k is gonna generate some serious amounts of data.
Can't wait for the reviews. Still jealous of those in-camera ND filters!
 

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Me too, built-in ND in an Ursa Mini. If there is one thing that could undoubtedly make shooting more practical and at the same time improve the quality of the footage, it's this flipping ND in-camera. I have used the built-in variable system in the Sony FS5 and it is very hard to go back to deciding which one of filtration level I should use on the typical built-in 3-4 stage system. In run and gun shooting I simply ride on the ND wheel to control the exposure while the lens iris, shutter speed and gain are all preset. No more problem of motion artifacting, changing DoF or gain noise level.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Me too, built-in ND in an Ursa Mini. If there is one thing that could undoubtedly make shooting more practical and at the same time improve the quality of the footage, it's this flipping ND in-camera. I have used the built-in variable system in the Sony FS5 and it is very hard to go back to deciding which one of filtration level I should use on the typical built-in 3-4 stage system. In run and gun shooting I simply ride on the ND wheel to control the exposure while the lens iris, shutter speed and gain are all preset. No more problem of motion artifacting, changing DoF or gain noise level.
Couldn't agree more. With the pocket 6k and GH5 together on a wedding shoot, it's different size filter threads, so end up with filter on one or the other, forcing a choice between cameras based on ND instead of focal length, or fumbling around with ND filters. I refuse to use the variable ND. And then it all changes, you go from outside to inside or clouds sweep in. Of course, not many events now with Covid19. But to your point, it's difficult enough to decide which one to put on even when I have time, 2-stop, 4-stop, 6-stop. I have them all, in every filter thread I have lenses for, which is everything from M4/3, S-35, FF more probably than any camera store in Denver. Royal pain in the arse. That said, Ursa Mini 12K would definitely not be my first choice for weddings, a beast to haul chasing the bride with all the other things going on.
 

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Couldn't agree more. With the pocket 6k and GH5 together on a wedding shoot, it's different size filter threads, so end up with filter on one or the other, forcing a choice between cameras based on ND instead of focal length, or fumbling around with ND filters. I refuse to use the variable ND. And then it all changes, you go from outside to inside or clouds sweep in. Of course, not many events now with Covid19. But to your point, it's difficult enough to decide which one to put on even when I have time, 2-stop, 4-stop, 6-stop. I have them all, in every filter thread I have lenses for, which is everything from M4/3, S-35, FF more probably than any camera store in Denver. Royal pain in the arse. That said, Ursa Mini 12K would definitely not be my first choice for weddings, a beast to haul chasing the bride with all the other things going on.
What's wrong with a really good variable ND? I agree that the concept is terrific- the look of a video depends on aperture and you dont want aperture to be dictated by the amount of light. So, variable ND.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
What's wrong with a really good variable ND? I agree that the concept is terrific- the look of a video depends on aperture and you dont want aperture to be dictated by the amount of light. So, variable ND.
Which one? I've tried, haven't tried one that didn't have artifacts, or adversely affected the image somewhere. With variable ND, you're filtering out light coming in from particular angles depending on the rotation of the polarizer and your orientation with the source, but you're not filtering all incident light equally. Some angles pass through, others get blocked. Does it matter? I don't know but so far I haven't liked it. Yes, the concept of variable ND is good, execution has not been for me so far. I'm still open but I've thrown money down the rabbit hole chasing.

Then you still have the problem of different filter sizes for different lenses. Due to cost, you may be tempted to use step-up rings, always a possibility of vignetting.
 
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Variable ND filters are really tough, but I've had endless headaches with fixed ND filters. Image degradation and especially coloration has made almost all of them a no-go for me, including some really expensive ones from B&W. It never fails to amaze me how so many of them advertise as not impacting color when they very obviously do.

There are few things as disheartening to me in video as having carefully dialed in color, only to have a bronze, blue or some other tint added to your video.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Have you used polarizers? They are far more appropriate to still photography. Depending on the orientation of it, certain angles are mitigated others are not. It filters the most when light is at a right angle. Now you use it to darken the sky, good as long as your not shooting wide angle where some of the sky light is at right angles other not, in which case you get a gradient across the sky. Or in video, you pan the camera and the darkening effect changes with the pan. Same phenomenon underpins the variable ND filter which is just two polarizers stacked.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Variable ND filters are really tough, but I've had endless headaches with fixed ND filters. Image degradation and especially coloration has made almost all of them a no-go for me, including some really expensive ones from B&W. It never fails to amaze me how so many of them advertise as not impacting color when they very obviously do.

There are few things as disheartening to me in video as having carefully dialed in color, only to have a bronze, blue or some other tint added to your video.
B&W, Hoya, Vivitar, Tiffen *are* the cheap ones, dyes applied through vacuum deposition, on one side of the glass, if decent a second coating to protect the first; if IR rated at all use cheap dyes. Use Formatt (Firecrest), coating is sandwiched between two pieces of ground glass, not a dye but a metallic film. But even cheap ND are better than variable up to 3 stops, then you have the problem of IR contamination because the longer (invisible to you) wavelength is not blocked, but is visible to the sensor in greater proportion as more density blocks only the visible light. An effective or worthwhile ND for video is often 4 - 6 stops, then you need IR filtration, IRND filter. Two types, dyes or metallic film. The latter good.

Edit: Forgot to add here, the keyword for metallic film in ND filters is called "hot mirror."
 

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Which one? I've tried, haven't tried one that didn't have artifacts, or adversely affected the image somewhere. With variable ND, you're filtering out light coming in from particular angles depending on the rotation of the polarizer and your orientation with the source, but you're not filtering all incident light equally. Some angles pass through, others get blocked. Does it matter? I don't know but so far I haven't liked it. Yes, the concept of variable ND is good, execution has not been for me so far. I'm still open but I've thrown money down the rabbit hole chasing.

Then you still have the problem of different filter sizes for different lenses. Due to cost, you may be tempted to use step-up rings, always a possibility of vignetting.
I have been using the PolarPro variable ND, which has stops where artifacts are minimized. I have shot a number of videos with it, so have experienced the great convenience, and not noticed any color issues. It is a 77mm filter, and I have used it with 77, 72, and 67mm opening lenses with step up rings. Again, I saw no vignetting. I can post links to videos I shot with the filter, but I have not done on-off comparisons. I know variable NDs have awful, justified often, reputations. And they are costly.
 

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B&W, Hoya, Vivitar, Tiffen *are* the cheap ones, dyes applied through vacuum deposition, on one side of the glass, if decent a second coating to protect the first; if IR rated at all use cheap dyes. Use Formatt (Firecrest), coating is sandwiched between two pieces of ground glass, not a dye but a metallic film. But even cheap ND are better than variable up to 3 stops, then you have the problem of IR contamination because the longer (invisible to you) wavelength is not blocked, but is visible to the sensor in greater proportion as more density blocks only the visible light. An effective or worthwhile ND for video is often 4 - 6 stops, then you need IR filtration, IRND filter. Two types, dyes or metallic film. The latter good.

Edit: Forgot to add here, the keyword for metallic film in ND filters is called "hot mirror."
I don't recall if I tried the Formatt brand, but it does sound familiar. I have so many lying around, I'll have to check. However with that said, I have spent upwards of $150 (which I don't think of as cheap for a ND filter) on a B&W filter, which is as much or more than the Formatt filters I've seen for the same size.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I don't recall if I tried the Formatt brand, but it does sound familiar. I have so many lying around, I'll have to check. However with that said, I have spent upwards of $150 (which I don't think of as cheap for a ND filter) on a B&W filter, which is as much or more than the Formatt filters I've seen for the same size.
Forematt or Firecrest "hot mirror" IRND
 

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Forematt or Firecrest "hot mirror" IRND
Just looking at B&H, these are not sold as screw on camera filters, but rather in 3x3 or 4x6 sheets...unless I'm looking at the wrong thing. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=Formatt hot mirror&N=0&InitialSearch=yes&sts=ma

I see nothing searching for Firecrest other than the same sheets. Interestingly Tiffen comes up with 'hot mirror' ND filters, but they seem to imply that these are for sensors that don't have IR filters. I thought most modern sensors do have IR filtration.

Do you have a link to a given size filter you're talking about?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just looking at B&H, these are not sold as screw on camera filters, but rather in 3x3 or 4x6 sheets...unless I'm looking at the wrong thing. https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=Formatt hot mirror&N=0&InitialSearch=yes&sts=ma

I see nothing searching for Firecrest other than the same sheets. Interestingly Tiffen comes up with 'hot mirror' ND filters, but they seem to imply that these are for sensors that don't have IR filters. I thought most modern sensors do have IR filtration.

Do you have a link to a given size filter you're talking about?
https://formatt-hitechusa.com/products/firecrest-neutral-density-filter-irnd?variant=31881881911405

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Formatt-Hitech-49mm-Firecrest-IRND-0-6-2-Stop-Neutral-Density-Filter-FC49ND-6/137392209?wmlspartner=wmtlabs&adid=22222222222062615671&wmlspartner=wmtlabs&wl0=e&wl1=o&wl2=c&wl3=17606458135&wl4=pla-4578984929023089&wl5=&wl6=&wl7=& wl10=Walmart&wl12=137392209_10000018299&wl14=formatt IRND filters&veh=sem&msclkid=382fd1b0db9b1a529c438ea2940fbd87

https://www.ebay.com/i/333617723756?chn=ps&norover=1&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-213727-13078-0&mkcid=2&itemid=333617723756&targetid=4581046486094194&device=c&mktype=&googleloc=&poi=&campaignid=395665087&mkgroupid=1239149814203389&rlsatarget=pla-4581046486094194&abcId=1129776&merchantid=51291&msclkid=3b46f3b2c676139d8a0eaca089e23c13

Walmart said:
Formatt Hitech 49mm Firecrest IRND 0.6 (2 Stop) Neutral Density Filter FC49ND.6The Formatt-Hitech Firecrest IRND 0.6 Filter is a solid neutral density filter providing a 2 stop reduction in exposure. This density creates a darkening of the entire image, allowing you to photograph with a wider aperture or longer shutter speed than normally required. By slowing your exposure time or increasing your aperture, you are able to control depth of field and convey movement more easily.Firecrest ND is a quantum leap improvement over all previous generation ND and IRND products and represents the technological state of the art in scientific light modification. These glass filters are hyper-neutral across the visible light spectrum and also remove more IR contamination than any other filter - making them IRND filters. Firecrest is a radical departure in how ND filters are manufactured. Previous generation NDs were made by dying resin. Firecrest is not a dying process, it is a rare earth metal coating process that is applied directly to the glass through an electrolytic process.The IRND design of this filter has been optimized for use with digital sensors and promote nearly flat attenuation of visible, UV, and infrared light. Due to imaging sensors' greater susceptibility to infrared light, compared to traditional film, color casts can occur when photographing darker subjects that require increased exposure times. This filter provides a high level of neutrality across all three spectrums in order to eliminate color casts and ensure cleaner, truer blacks.Applied to the outside of the Schott Superwite glass construction is a 15-layer Firecrest multi-coating, which helps to minimize reflections and flare in order maintain truer colors and contrast. The multi-coating is also scratch-resistant and hydrophobic to benefit the overall durability of the filter. The filter is set within a 5.5mm-thick SuperSlim aluminum filter ring, which features front threads for stacking additional filters or attaching a lens cap.
Hot mirror filters can also be purchased as a clear glass filter by stacking in front of a regular ND. The Hot Mirror is always the first filter that light should pass through, goes on the outside.

I have the clear glass 4x6 Formatt hot mirror that you linked. It was expensive as hell and hard to find, but I finally found it used on eBay for about $200. (actually 4 x 5.65), a standard size which goes into the matte box for my F55. Ironically, the most expensive camera is the most susceptible to IR contamination. Most hot mirror filters come as a layer on ND filters. If you have the clear glass hot mirror, you can stack cheaper ND filters behind it as long as you avoid shooting wide causing vignettes.

Ken Ross said:
Image degradation and especially coloration has made almost all of them a no-go for me
Color shifts from ND filters are usually due to white balance or IR contamination. It's worse with stronger ND. For example, you put on a 6 stop ND filter, you now have to increase exposure by the same 6 stops, attaining the benefit of slower shutter speed and open apertures along the way. But while the ND filter has decreased visible light transmission by 6 stops, IR was not affected. It gets proportionately stronger as the the ND value selected becomes stronger. I made mistake by attributing this to cheaper filters, I'd walk back that response to just say that filters don't know how much they cost, and there may be equal or even better performance value in a cheaper one if it is of high quality. Dyes absorb light, convert it to heat. The hot mirror reflects light back to the source, that's why it goes on the outside.
 
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