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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A friend of mine is considering changing her upstairs bonus room over the garage into a semi-dedicated HT with front projection screen. Basically, it's long (around 32') and narrow (around 11 1/2'), with a 7' 6" angled ceiling.


What I mean by semi-dedicated is that if she decides to move or finishes the basement and sends the equipment down to the bowels of the house she wants to easily return the bonus room to some sort of normalcy with as little fuss as possible-- as in pretty non permanent solutions that look like they weren't just tacked up. Not an easy thing!


She would like to go with a 92-96" diagonal fixed screen (like a Carada) due to not wanting to put up with the potential wrinkles and waves of a drop down screen and doesn't have the funds for a tab tensioned model.


Here's the problem: the wall that the screen must be put on has a fairly long, sort of narrow window right smack in the middle of it! The other end has an entrance door in the middle of the other wall.


Are there any suggestions from the pros or those who have had a similar problem as to non-permanently blocking the window and frame and putting the screen in front of it, while still maintaining theater-like asthetics?


I was thinking of framing the perimeter of the screen wall with a tied back, heavy burgundy drape and frilly valance like those in old tyme movie palaces, but with what and how could I cover the blank portions that the screen does not without painting? I'd like to have the area black so the screen looks like it is floating-- a large, flattened piece of velvet?


How would I go about putting the frame in front of everything? A stand? Can you get cheap screen stands? Off set the frame with brackets drilled to the wall?? I'm kind of at a loss.


Your ideas would be most appreciated! Thank you!


Dan
 

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I once had to hang a screen from chains due to a floor-to ceiling window where I wanted to put the screen. (There was literally no wall-space to mount brackets for it)


I ended up sinking 2 hooks into the ceiling (into the joists), then getting some chain (spray painted it black to match the frame), and hanging the screen from the hooks in the ceiling. Luckily my screen was a pull-down, and the case happened to work prefectly for hanging.


With a fixed-screen, you may need some extra method to keep the screen from tilting forward if you hang it.
 

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I have nearly an identical room, but I can't help you, I have three layers of 5/8" drywall covering the window. The outside face of the drywall was painted flat black so it looks like an empty room.


My eight 15" TC2+ subs will use an infinite baffle configuration and the garage as a rearspace. The subs will be on the floor in the middle of the proscenium.
 

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She can have her cake and eat it too. The DaLite High Power screen does not need to be tab tensioned, it is excellent at rejecting waviness (and hotspotting despite the high gain). This is due to the retro-reflective nature of the screen.


Andy K.
 

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Easiest way to handle the window is simply to paint over it. Scraping the paint (black is best) is a bit of a hassle, but that's way in the future. And/or staple some black mylar inside the frame.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMF
Easiest way to handle the window is simply to paint over it. Scraping the paint (black is best) is a bit of a hassle, but that's way in the future. And/or staple some black mylar inside the frame.



That is the worst advice that I have ever heard!
 

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Care to grace us with an explanation? Or are we simply to bow to your omniscience? :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the ideas so far!


J_Palmer_Cass,


What would be your advice then? Seriously, I'd love to hear it.


I'm worried that part of the window and frame will be visible: either the top portion or the bottom depending on what's best for positioning the screen. Still looking for good asthetic.


Any more?
 

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new paint is easy to clean from glass, but long dried paint is much harder, it will be a real paint to clean. I once did it (we were using a paint gun) and my friend said we did not need to cover the windows on the house, when done painting the first few went well to scratch off, but as time passed it seemed less and less like a good idea, can't even imagine how much of a pain it would be after a few months


if it is aesthetics, and not hang the screen


take a piece of ply wood (or MDF or something else flat, cut it for a snug fit in window ) add a frame that is as thick as the widow box minus the thickness of the wood (i.e. so that it is even with the window frame. paint to match the wall and drill a small finger hole in the middle of the window (so that it is covered by screen)


if you want to make it nicer and don't mind a bit more work, remove the internal frame of the window and make it all flush with the wall
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DMF
Care to grace us with an explanation? Or are we simply to bow to your omniscience? :rolleyes:


Painting window glass would not qualify for good advice EVEN if you lived in a trailer park!



What are you guys, a bunch of vandals, or just a bunch of wise guys?
 

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A couple of thoughts here:


1) I have used the thick blue construction foamboard surrounded with the thick weatherstripping and covered in a stretchy black fabric (cotton/spandex) to cover up some of my windows. The trick is sizing the blue foam correctly so you get a nice tight press fit against the inside of the window frame. Depending on the type of windows you have this may not work. You could pick some other color than black to cover the blue foam in.


2) Cover the entire screen wall in black velvet, mount the screen, then add your drapes. This is not cheap but it will make it look like the screen is floating on the wall.


Laters,

Jeff
 
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