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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One warm summer evening in 1965, a helicopter took off from Manhattan and pointed itself at Queens. On board, the four biggest stars in the world peered toward their destination, the home of the New York Mets. Already sick with nerves, the Beatles suddenly knew they were headed for the wildest night of their lives. Forty years later, the show they played that Aug. 15 at Shea Stadium stands for the peak of that madness the world knew as Beatlemania.


Hysterical fans were the norm at Beatles shows by 1965. What was different at Shea was that the hysteria gripped the band as well. Captured on 12 TV cameras around the stage, the Beatles' performance was a riot of panic and hilarity. While 55,600 fans screamed and cried, and 1300 New York police struggled to keep order, the four young men at the center of it all looked at one another and knew this was something they could not control, only enjoy.


At that point, it was the biggest concert ever staged for a rock-and-roll act. (Yet its promoter, Sid Bernstein, spent not a cent on advertising — word of mouth ensured an instant sellout.) When the Beatles' helicopter dropped them close to the stadium, they had to be smuggled inside by an armored Wells Fargo truck. George Harrison quipped: "I didn't think Wells Fargo were still going; I thought the Indians had got them all years ago." In the changing room, they were fascinated by the exotic names on the baseball players' hangers. But when they changed into their mod stage costumes, Paul McCartney said, they became "the four-headed monster."


It took a manic sprint to reach the stage, erected at second base, where they were introduced by Ed Sullivan, whose company was coproducing the TV special.
http://members.tripod.com/~Calvin8tor/b/enter.jpg

The noise was deafening. "We were playing through the baseball speakers," Paul has said, "and you couldn't hear a thing with the screaming." In vain they tried to retune their guitars. Not even the custom-built Vox amplifiers—primitive by today's standards—could prevail in that steaming cauldron of teen passion. And how many of those screaming girls fantasized about marrying a Beatle? Actually two of those present achieved exactly that: Barbara Bach became the future Mrs. Ringo Starr. And Linda Eastman the future Mrs. McCartney.


In collar and tie, chewing impassively, the Beatles' manager, Brian Epstein looked on. He knew he was witnessing the highest grossing rock show so far ($304,000).

Perhaps he also sensed that his life would never get better than this. But up on the stage, his beloved "boys" were not thinking so much as just trying to make it through the show. They bashed their way through twelve songs, including the title track of their movie "Help!", which had premiered in New York four days earlier. Throughout Paul's new number "I'm Down", he watched George weep with laughter as John Lennon played the keyboard with his elbow. Neither they nor the audience could hear the difference. It was, Paul said, "like being in a washing machine".


After the show, they retreated to their lair on the 33rd floor of Manhattan's Warwick Hotel, still besieged by fans. Their guests included Bob Dylan and members of the Supremes. Security prevented the Beatles from accepting an invitation to visit Frank Sinatra, while Frank declined to drop by the Warwick.


By the time ABC finally aired the concert on January 10, 1967, it was already a document of a vanished age. Disillusioned by touring, the Beatles had played their last ever public show on August 29, 1966, in San Francisco. The band had decided to concentrate on recording.


Yet if Shea Stadium was the beginning of the end for the Beatles as live performers, it was the dawning of a new era for rock music. Vast outdoor shows would become the superstar standard, as rivals the Rolling Stones took up the baton the Beatles had dropped. Amplification and stagecraft advanced; bands such as Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin took the rock gig to heights previously undreamed of.


Consider this: John, Paul, George and Ringo took just two helpers out on the road. Modern acts like U2 take dozens. But Shea's performance will never be forgotten. It certainly haunted John. "At Shea Stadium" he once said, "I saw the top of the mountain".



-- Paul Du Noyer
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertWood
..."Consider this: John, Paul, George and Ringo took just two helpers out on the road. Modern acts like U2 take dozens".
Man, don't get me started on that. Anyways, a local guy was telling me a good while back how he caught their show when they came here to town some 40 years ago (I being a wee lad at the time). He said, "We were yelling, whooping, hollerin', throwing stuff...we couldn't see anything...It was great!"
 

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I am SO GLAD that they got disallusioned, man those guys transcended just about everything when they focused on studio work.


Their music in 1965 wasnt even very good, i guess it showed promise, but its their work from 67-70 which I will always love.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR_IN_LA
I am SO GLAD that they got disallusioned, man those guys transcended just about everything when they focused on studio work.


Their music in 1965 wasnt even very good, i guess it showed promise, but its their work from 67-70 which I will always love.


Have to beg to differ with you there John. One song alone, Norwegian Wood says it all but there were many others of course from 62-66....Yesterday, Daytripper....

for example check out some of the songs from this link to a the greatest hits from 62-66.

http://www.sing365.com/music/lyric.n...2569FC0004DD57



Back in the 60's when I was single digits, there was a house nearby that had a garage that would flood during heavy rain because of poor design. In that garage were old albums, yes beatles albums which had gotten wet and a bit warped. They gave them to me and I remember being able to play them. As I recall it was Albums like Meet the Beatles, Rubber Soul .etc..yes all originals. It was probably like 68-70 when I got them. Even with the water they played fine. Where are they today? I only wish I knew.
 

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Rubber Soul was released in December 65, so I dont really count that :D

Name one album they had before Rubber soul, that which is on par with Abbey Road, White Album, Sgt Peppers, Magical Mystery Tour, etc.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR_IN_LA
Rubber Soul was released in December 65, so I dont really count that :D

Name one album they had before Rubber soul, that which is on par with Abbey Road, White Album, Sgt Peppers, Magical Mystery Tour, etc.
Now you are back peddling ! No one said that they had peaked by 1965 only that they had done some great stuff. Just looking at that list alone , volumes are spoken and no doubt some tremendous work by then.


Art
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR_IN_LA
Rubber Soul was released in December 65, so I dont really count that :D

Name one album they had before Rubber soul, that which is on par with Abbey Road, White Album, Sgt Peppers, Magical Mystery Tour, etc.
I hear what you are saying, as the above you mentioned are albums with songs that got changed from the early stuff that had more of a 50's early 60's sound, but those early years still had some great songs. I believe Yesterday is one of the most played and recorded songs but don't quote me on that.
 

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Bob - thanks for that flashback (well OK I was only about 5 at the time). A nicely written piece just when I was in the mood for some nostalgia (whether I realized it or not).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnR_IN_LA
I am SO GLAD that they got disallusioned, man those guys transcended just about everything when they focused on studio work.


Their music in 1965 wasnt even very good, i guess it showed promise, but its their work from 67-70 which I will always love.
Actually it was VERY good. It may not have been as cohesive as their later albums but there are lots of gems from the early releases.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertWood
I keep wondering what music John Lennon would have created over the past twenty-five years.
The last album released before he died was Double Fantasy and the Lennon stuff there was solid- lyrical, musical, and showed a Lennon that had matured during his self imposed exile/retirement/house-husband years. After all, at the time of his death he wasn't a young pup anymore at 40 years old. I'm sure he would have made it a point to be controversial at times but for the most part I think he would have put out some super music over the years. Unlike Harrison he seemed to want to make music, at the time of his death he seemed to want to anyway.


If there were any Beatles reunion I think it would have been brief and mostly for the money, because at that point there was no good reason to make it happen, other than for the fans were clamouring for one. The boys were all wealthy to ridiculous proportions and getting richer every year via royalties. If there WERE a reunion and a tour, the hype, profits, scale would have been on a level I can't even imagine. I recall them being offered ridiculous amounts of money in the seventies to just do ONE concert that would be broadcast via satellite.


It's entirely possible they would have worked together in different degrees on various solo projects- I can even see John and Paul doing some songwriting together and guesting on a few tracks of each other's solo releases along the way. It would have also been great to see him do some music with Julian.
 

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A few rambling opinions of mine. The Beatles were great from the start and only got better. Paul McCartney has done very little of any significance since the Beatles broke up. Lennon probably would have but we didn't get a chance to find out. Harrison and Starr were only ordinary at best but together the four were magical and I don't think there has been anything that created such hysteria since their arrival here in the US. No music is as much fun for me to listen to after all of these years, although I know a part of it is the fond memories it brings back. Rubber Soul was the best of their albums although several others were close to as good. Thanks for making me recall those days.


Chris
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Gerhard
A few rambling opinions of mine. The Beatles were great from the start and only got better. Paul McCartney has done very little of any significance since the Beatles broke up. Chris


Paul McCartney and Wings put out a ton of great songs for years..


Band On The Run

Uncle Albert

SIlly Love Songs


And many more, most of these songs would have been solid Beatles tunes ...


Lennon also put out some incredible work shortly after Breakup. I love "Plastic Ono Band" album, Imagine, Mind Games ...



Their productivity went down as they aged, but thats natural for most popular musicians, almost all do their best work before they are 35.
 

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Harrison and Starr were only ordinary at best but together the four were magical
Wow. I couldn't disagree more strongly with the first part of that statement. These are among my favorite tunes put out by the fabulous four before and after the breakup... all written by George. (Gives me chills just thinkin about them.)


Something

My Sweet Lord

While My Guitar Gently Weeps

Beware of Darkness

I Need You

Isn't It a Pity

Give Me Love

If I Needed Someone

All Things Must Pass

Here Comes the Sun

That's the Way it Goes

For You Blue...


George was the "serious one" though (in the beginning anyway).


As far as just the Beatles themselves were concerned, I'd agree that the music of their early years isn't as "substantial", but I'm still more partial to their slightly fluffier and groovier sound of that time. Many people would probably consider tunes like, say "Not a Second Time" (Lennon) or "Don't Bother Me" (Harrison) from 1963's With the Beatles throwaways, but it's tunes like those which really epitomize the wit and charm of the Beatle sound for me.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ADU
Wow. I couldn't disagree more strongly with the first part of that statement. These are among my favorite tunes put out by the fabulous four before and after the breakup... all written by George. (Gives me chills just thinkin about them.)
ADU, I couldn't agree more strongly with you. I've never been what you'd call a big Beatles fan, but I think Harrison was clearly the most talented of the bunch, closely followed by McCartney. I find I can listen to their solo stuff, while the group efforts I tend to take a pass at.
 

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Even Ringo's "Photograph" would have been a killer Beatles tune...

Harrisons stuff was great but he was no where near as prolific as Lennon/McCartney...


I think the White Album and Abbey Road were their strongest works.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Ya'll just weren't around in 1963 is all (I was 14). You would understand how amazing it was when we first heard their bubble gum stuff too. When "I Want to Hold Your Hand" and "She Loves You"

and all the other early hits were released big in America, no one had ever heard anything like it before. The whole country was so absolutely knocked out of it's socks by it that, in the beginning, many radio stations played only Beatles around the clock.

The Beatles were a phenomenon which had never happened before and hasn't happened since.
 
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