AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, let me say that I like to somewhat overdo things :cool: . I feel it provides some sort of insurance. I'm probably not alone on this forum. I have a 7.1 set-up. Speakers are Energy c9 times 2 in front, energy c3 times 4 in back and c-c3 or something as center. I've recently gotten up to owning 4 crown xls 602 amps. So, that's 370 per channel. I realized that, at this point, I can probably forego showers and clean myself with the sonic pressure in my room if I choose. As I ponder where I'll wander through the land of upgradation (that sounds like a mighty fine lyric), I daydream about various options. One of these options I've been considering is to slowly add 3 more crown amps, same as the above-mentioned amps, for a total of 7 of them. I would then bridge them, giving each channel 1200 watts. Here are my questions--Would this provide any improvement or be useful in any way? My goal is not necessarily to throw a rap concert, but I enjoy solid volumes from time to time. I truly noticed a satisfying difference when I added one amp to power just the mains after using a 110 watt/channel denon 3802. This even at moderate volumes. Just sounded more unencumbered and textured and tasty, as subjective as those terms are. Would another increase in the power provide a similar improvement or, at this point, would I simply be beyond the range where it helps to add power? I really don't know much about bridging, but I have this vague memory of hearing that it might lessen the sound quality a bit. Are there any negative issues associated with bridging?

Just looking for overall thoughts on positives/negatives of this option. Thanks.

Lewis
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,779 Posts
Actually, you bring up an interesting idea....there is bound to be a point of diminishing returns, but I've never had the money or equipment to test it.


One surprise for me was adding a Crown K1 amp to my Denon 2805 that is driving Klipsch RF5's. I would not have thought that a speaker that efficient would need the extra headroom that the Crown brings.


I know people imagine all sorts of things when listening to audio equipment, but I swear there is a greater sense of transparency and "unrestrained openness" (whatever that means). Funny thing is, I am not playing the system any "louder" than I did before. SPL at the listening spot still averages around 85-90 db for music and somewhat higher for really LFE laden movies.


So, I will be watching with great curiosity answers from others concerning your question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,880 Posts
First off, let me say that I like to somewhat overdo things :cool: .


Me too.


I've recently gotten up to owning 4 crown xls 602 amps.


:)


Do a bridge mode test since you have some amps. See if you enjoy

the extra headroom.



One of these options I've been considering is to slowly add 3 more crown amps, same as the above-mentioned amps, for a total of 7 of them.


Do that test and you will know for sure. I enjoy high powered bridged

amplification as I prefer to listen to loud levels and raising the clipping headroom

makes for cleaner transients.

I would then bridge them, giving each channel 1200 watts.


My QSC amp is rated at 1200w/ch @ 2 ohms and it's driving

a line array {midranges} at 2 ohm load per channel. The speakers are handling

the amplifier well and I can go bigger.

Here are my questions--Would this provide any improvement or be useful in any way? My goal is not necessarily to throw a rap concert, but I enjoy solid volumes from time to time.


Do the test :)

I really don't know much about bridging

See owners manual for 'how to do it'.


4x theoretical more power, realistically only 2x, 2x more clipping headroom.

but I have this vague memory of hearing that it might lessen the sound quality a bit.


Check the amplfier distortion specs in bridged mode. It may be higher but still

usually in the inaudible range at full power. Obviously, lower distortion at lower power.

Are there any negative issues associated with bridging?


The lowest impedance you are able to drive is higher in bridged mode vs. non.,

ie the XLS is rated for 2 ohms in stereo, but only 4 ohms in bridged mode.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,260 Posts
Sometimes the THD actually drops...

As when the amplifiers are in the bridged push/pull configuration mode, certain THD components are cancelled out..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
772 Posts
From my limited knowledge I have read that the noise floor is raised when an amp is bridged. Test it out and see if it really is the case.


Just my 0.02.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,863 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by dollarman
From my limited knowledge I have read that the noise floor is raised when an amp is bridged. Test it out and see if it really is the case.


Just my 0.02.
The voltage gain increases 6 dB, so that could bring up the noise floor of the incoming signal accordingly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I know, I know. Try it out. But that means I have to get up out of my chair and figure it out and maybe bring out the soldering gun to switch one of my interconnects around. Life's hard sometimes.


In theory, it sounds like there are pros and cons. Real life testing is the key.


thylantyr--have you tried your same speaker array on considerably lower power, say 200-500 watts (in the neighborhood of my meager crown's 370), or did you jump straight to 1200? If you did try something lower, do you feel there was a noticeable difference when you increased to 1200?


Is there anyway to come up with a theoretically maximum useful value? For instance, if we know that cd audio has a (big number) to (small number) dynamic range, and if it takes a certain amount of additional power to double the volume, and if we assume that typical satisfying listening volume is average 75 db (or whatever), then can we figure out how much power would be necessary to fully reproduce the entire dynamic range without running out of power? I know that it's been while since I've been involved in science in a scholarly way, so you'll have to accept my very lame attempt at an explanation above. I think the idea is discernible, however. I would assume that the answer would come out something like: for a reference listening level of A dbs, B watts of power are necessary to guarantee that the entire dynamic range of C to D will be reproduced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,880 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by lewdog
thylantyr--have you tried your same speaker array on considerably lower power, say 200-500 watts (in the neighborhood of my meager crown's 370), or did you jump straight to 1200? If you did try something lower, do you feel there was a noticeable difference when you increased to 1200?


You got PM :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
I'd be careful about running a bridged amp into a 2 Ohm load. Bridging an amp increases an amp's voltage output but the amp's current capacity remains the same. Also by bridging an amp, the amp now sees the impedence load as half. So if the impedence load before bridging was 4 Ohms, the impedence load will now look like 2 Ohms to the bridged amp and so on. Very few manufacturers publish any output data on their amps below 4 Ohms because of this reason; in fact many manufacturers specifically recommend against applying any impedence load below 4 Ohms when the amp is bridged.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top