AVS Forum banner
661 - 680 of 1484 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Stewart /forum/post/0


Grider, that's very nice. It appears to blend very well with the look and "feel" of the mantel and, I would guess, other furniture in the room.


Could you elaborate a bit on the U-shaped metal braces you used? How wide/high are they? Did you buy them at your local Home Depot or Lowe's or local equivalent? Were they inexpensive? Did you inset them into the underside of the top piece. (I'd guess not, because you have a trim piece in front, and because you'd have to lie on your back on the floor to see them.) That type of approach might be helpful for future projects.


Ron

Haha... well it took me a while to figure out the right thing for metal braces. I wanted something low profile (3/4" max) and it had to be strong. I looked at various 'L' shaped profiles but all seemed a little flimsy. So I ended up wandering the aisles of Home Depot looking for inspiration.


I found it in the shelving isle. My U shaped channels are the vertical uprights used in a shelving system. You know the kind where you attach two vertiacal channels (u shaped) to the wall and then clip in metal shelf supports. Comes in black or silver.


There is two rows of slots every inch or so along the length of the channel to allow infinite adjustment of shelves. I used 5/8" screws through these slots every 6" and fastened to the underside of my top.


Looks like this: Rubbermaid - U Channel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Nick /forum/post/0


Grider,

Very nice job.


You say you strengthened your joints with biscuits. Did you use dados or butt joints?


I notice there is a slight overhang on the top and bottom pieces. I really like that look. How much? I've been thinking about that since cutting a dado seems like it would be harder if you are stopping an inch from the end to allow for an overhang.


--Chris

Mixture of dado's and butt joints. I wouldn't hesitate to use butt joints only... they are VERY strong when using biscuits.


The overhang is 1".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by grider /forum/post/0


Haha... well it took me a while to figure out the right thing for metal braces. I wanted something low profile (3/4" max) and it had to be strong. I looked at various 'L' shaped profiles but all seemed a little flimsy. So I ended up wandering the aisles of Home Depot looking for inspiration.


I found it in the shelving isle. My U shaped channels are the vertical uprights used in a shelving system. You know the kind where you attach two vertiacal channels (u shaped) to the wall and then clip in metal shelf supports. Comes in black or silver.


There is two rows of slots every inch or so along the length of the channel to allow infinite adjustment of shelves. I used 5/8" screws through these slots every 6" and fastened to the underside of my top.

Very clever. I've used those channels before for their original use. It never occurred to me to use them for horizontal bracing.


Thanks for the info.


Ron
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by schaffer970 /forum/post/0


When they say the caster will handle a 100# load, it means that each one will hold that amount. So if you put 4 under the unit it will hold 400#, with 6 600 #. It really comes down to the margin of safety you want and whether you have any bending issues (make sure the load is evenly placed over the wheels).

I purchased these casters at lunch. And had a very informative talk with the sales manager at L.G. Rathbun here in Colorado about how I wanted to use them. While they are rated at 100#, he showed me that they are much stronger. He stood on one with a hard sole boot and all of his 240# of weight and it held up fine.


His comment was that I needed 6 not because of the strength of the caster but because of the design of my entertainment center which will be 78 wide. The only other issue is mounting. His comment is that he would not mount into oak plywood or pine with only a 1/2 inch screw but would need to go with at least a 1", preferably a sheet metal screw rather than a wood screw to really get the benefit of the 100# rating. So if I do that I will need to add and 1 x2 or 1 x 3 between the caster and plywood underside. That would actually make the unit stronger if I run a 1x2 around the lower edge to support 6 casters. I asked about the need for eight and he said that more will not make it easier to roll.


He also told me that I should allow an inch of clearance between the skirt and bottom of the caster since the caster will sink into even a very short carpet and the skirt could be sitting on the ground.


Has anyone else used this model? How have you mounted it? What width of skirt did you use to hide them. My carpet is quite short, so I'm not sure how much they'll really sink in, even with 200# of TV and components and perhaps 150# of furniture over them.


Once again the link is www.lgrathbun.com/dz215.htm


BTW a word on the progress of my unit. Thanks again for everyone's advice I have cut my top bottom boards to length and also have the router jig ready for my dados. The only challenge has been taping the boards to prevent the oak laminate from tearing on the edge. I'm using a saw guide and a skill saw for the long pieces but will use my small table saw to finish cut the uprights (this should help with the tearing) Thanks especially to Ron Stewart for help with the dado jig. I'm going to stop my cuts 1.75 away from the front edge to accomodate the door and a ledge around the front and sides. This took a little measuring to screw a stop into the top of my jig. The jig fits perfectly over the board and snugly holds the upright piece that will fit in the dado, and with the combination of a pattern bit will guarantee a really tight fit on the dado. I have a practice piece of wood that I'm going to work on to make sure I have it right before I start in on the real piece. Tomorrow I start the dados and if all goes well hope to have the main pieces of the box and uprights together by the end of the weekend. I decided to go with a pivot hinge from Rockler rather than a euro style hinge for the door. The euros look great but it looked like it was going to be complicated to fit an inset hinge in the same door as glass. They also require about 50 bucks in a special jig and bit to cut the insets, so I'm going with simplicity. I'll probably try this if I ever do an upgrade cabinet.


If any other wannabe woodworkers are lurking on the sidelines, this is fun, and not too hard if you go slowly.


--Chris
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
297 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Nick /forum/post/0


The only challenge has been taping the boards to prevent the oak laminate from tearing on the edge. I'm using a saw guide and a skill saw for the long pieces but will use my small table saw to finish cut the uprights (this should help with the tearing)

--Chris

RE: preventing tearout

When using a Skil saw, good side of the plywood should be down; with a table saw, good side up. Besides masking tape, you can also score the cutting line with a utility knife to sever the top wood fibers cleanly before running it through a saw.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Okay I am looking at building a cabinet some time in the next year when I have some time and a little more $$. I am an extreme novice, but I have friends that will help and have a bunch of the equipment and experience needed. I have several questions on both design and build.


I want a low 3 section unit like many have here, including: RGrim, Pine 2, and IronHorse; very similar to the Diamond Case TT400. I am getting rid of several pieces of equipment and will be left with:

TV 56W x 35 5/16H x 15 5/16D

Receiver 17 5/16W x 6 ½H x 17 1/8D

DVD Player 16 15/16W x 3H x 17 3/16D

Cable HD-DVR 17W x 3 ¼H x 13D

HTS-2600 17W x 4H x 9 3/4D

Center Channel 20 ½W x 7 7/8H x 9D

Xbox 360 12 1/8W x 3 ¼H x 10 1/8D
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/attac...chmentid=44695


I think the over dimensions would be approximately 68 wide by 24 high x 24 deep. This would allow for 2 20 areas on the side and a 22 middle section, to allow for plenty of room of equipment and allow for future expansion, especially tv.


I want doors on the front like Pine 2's unit and the TT400. I would like to put a perforated metal screen/sheet on the 2 side doors and mesh on the middle. I hope this will help with ventilation. On the rear I think I would like to recess the middle section like IronHorse has done with his cabinet. I would also like to add cable management, possible 2 boxes connecting the left and right sides, inside the top and bottom of the rear of the middle section. I would like hidden casters like IronHorse has on his unit for easy movement.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/attac...chmentid=33276
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/attac...chmentid=29639
http://www.diamondcase.com/TT/TT_HTML_Files/TT400.HTML


I saw that Diamond Cases TT400 has an offset back panel. They have machined threaded blocks on the back that suspend the back panel 1 off the back of the unit and the machined threads allow for easy removal of the back panels. I think this would be a nice feature to add as well. I would really like to find some perforated metal shelves like the TT400, this would really add to cooling.
http://www.diamondcase.com/TT/TT_HTML_Files/TT_Pro.HTML


What is the difference, both in cost and function, of plywood vs. real wood? I want a darker finish w/o too much grain, and not too expensive. What are some good woods? Would it be better to do plywood sides bottom and use a real wood for the top, or vice versa? What is a decent cheap/free program to help me design/draw a cabinet?



Thanks for any help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Plywood is less expensive (perhaps half price?) and it's readily available in 4'x8' sizes. Solid wood will probably have to joined to make the size you require. Plywood doesn't expand as much with humidity as solid materials (which can be a concern in large projects). For this reason, I wouldn't go with your idea of mixing plywood and solid materials (unless perhaps all of your horizontal pieces are solid) . If you work with plywood, you have to either put veneer on the edges, or attach solid wood edging (much more preferable imo), but either way that's more effort than working with solid wood. Solid vs plywood strengths should not be an issue. As for the types of wood, see whats available at your local home depot or whichever store you deal with. You mentioned that you don't want much grain pattern - take a look at birch or maple plywood (both of which have less of a grain pattern than oak). They should have wood stain samples on different materials so that should give you some color ideas. As for the height of the unit, think short as you want the center of the screen to be at eye level. I think 24" is a bit high, but of course it has to house your equipment. I've always designed on paper, however I have to admit for this project I am learning autodesk inventor (which we use at work)...fantastic program, but it does have a bit of a learning curve. I'm in no rush to finish this project (as I'm leaning towards waiting for the 2006 sxrd's), but I will post the drawings (or email them if requested) when I'm done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by mondo3 /forum/post/0


As for the height of the unit, think short as you want the center of the screen to be at eye level. I think 24" is a bit high, but of course it has to house your equipment.

Thanks for the reply. 24" is a good hieght for me, it is not exactly eye level, but it will add a couple of inches that will not be covered by a hyper 2 year old. Right now it is about 35-40" high, which works out great since his head is below the entire screen, so going to 24" will not seem too high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I am planning to build a simple 17"H x 44"L x 22"W stand for my 46" Toshiba rear-projection TV (46H84), which weights about 150 lbs. I've come up with a design that would place the TV's screen at the correct viewing height and has room for all of my components. I am planning to build it out of 3/4" red oak plywood using butt-joints secured by screws. I'll also cover about a quarter of the backside with 1/4" plywood to prevent raking. I've never done a project like this before and am unsure if my design will support the weight of my TV. I like the idea above about using metal braces attached to the underside, but I don't know if I need it. I'd appreciate any suggestions or advice, especially concerning the weight issue. Attached is a diagram of my plan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts
bdeco...


Given you're a beginner woodworker, my comments here are based on keeping it simple...


Your TV probably only weighs 80lbs and the weight will be spread accross the top of your cabinet so you should not need to worry about bracing. The vertical panel you have in the middle will provide all of the support you need.


I suggest you make the middle verticle panels and the two side panels exactly the same height and have the bottom and top panels fit across all three vertical panels like a sandwich. This will give you the best strength.


Butt Joints with screws should be fine... make sure you use a bead of good quality wood glue on each joint. You may want to invest in a very inexpensive dowel jig from someone like Wolfcraft. Using this tool adding 3 or 4 3/8" dowels per joint would be quite easy and add considerably to the strength.


When you put your glue on, put just enough to cover while avoiding squeeze out. Thoughrougly clean away and squeezed out glue ASAP... any residual will prevent those areas from accepting stain.


I'd like to see you add a little more of a back panel... ideally it should span the three verticals and either the top or bottom edge. (you could cover the full width and half the back for example. Another easy option is to cover the entire back and make rectangular cut outs with a jigsaw in the areas you need to access.


Tip - make yourself a list of the finished sized panels you need and have the lumber store cut the finished sizes you need. They should be plenty accurate for your needs. Just make sure that the guy cuts the same size pieces at the same time without moving the saw fence (i.e. Cut 3 verticals together, cut 2 shelves together, cut top and bottom together).


Go for it... you can do it!... post some pictures when you're done.


Edit: Your vertical sizes don't quite add up.... On the right with four 3/4" thickness the total is 17". On the left with three 3/4" thickness the total is 17 3/4"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Thanks for the tips. I am pretty sure the TV actually is 150 lbs. It is the 46H84 projection TV, not a plasma. Having the back panel span all three verticals is probably a good idea, problem is I would only be able to make it 3 - 4" tall, considering the shelf heights. Good catch on the measurement error, the bottom left shelf should be 6.75 in. Can I use both dowels and screws at the butt joints? What do you think is the best way to hide the screws?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by bdeco /forum/post/0


Thanks for the tips. I am pretty sure the TV actually is 150 lbs. It is the 46H84 projection TV, not a plasma. Having the back panel span all three verticals is probably a good idea, problem is I would only be able to make it 3 - 4" tall, considering the shelf heights. Good catch on the measurement error, the bottom left shelf should be 6.75 in. Can I use both dowels and screws at the butt joints? What do you think is the best way to hide the screws?

Should still be OK with 150 lbs.


Yes... you SHOULD use both dowels, screws and GLUE for your butt joints. Three x 1.75" #8 or # 10 screws and Four x 1/4" or 3/8" dowels per joint. i.e. 7 pcs in total... space them equally with a screw in the center and the other two screws in the outermost position's.


Use a screw setter bit (also from Wolfcraft)... this will drill a pilot hole for your screw and counter bore at the same time for a 3/8" wooden plug. You can buy bags of 3/8" taper wooden plugs with a flat top commonly in maple or oak. Tap them in and sand flush.


I'd cover the whole of the back with a sheet of 1/4" plywood... cut two large openings spanning the left and right shelves. e.g. on the left side cut an opening that is 12" high and say 18" wide and on the right side 12" high and 14" wide. Before you cut the openings drill a 1" or larger hole at each of the four corners so that when you cut out the opening it has a radius in each corner. This radius will greatly add to the structural integrity.


You will probably want to add 6 wheels to the bottom (2 under each vertical). You can buy pairs of low profile wheels (about 2" high) designed for carpet and rated about 50-70lbs per wheel. They have a plate with 4 screw holes (use four 5/8" #10 dome head screws).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by grider /forum/post/0



You will probably want to add 6 wheels to the bottom (2 under each vertical). You can buy pairs of low profile wheels (about 2" high) designed for carpet and rated about 50-70lbs per wheel. They have a plate with 4 screw holes (use four 5/8" #10 dome head screws).

Grider, will four 5/8 screws into plywood be strong enough? The guy who sold me my casters said I should put a board under the plywood to thicken it and use at least a 1" screw. I'd rather not add any height to the unit, but I also don't want the screws pulling out. I'm concerned it could happen if the small wheel is sunk into the carpet when I'm trying to move it. My unit will be 79 x 24 of oak ply and will house 5 components plus a 65 inch DLP.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Grider, Thanks for taking the time to impart your wisdom!!!

I'm also building a similar stand but it will be a corrner stand with 3/4" plywood for the sides and maybe pegboard in the back.

My question is can one get buy with 3/8" dowels only? I'd rather not have the plugs showing (even though it would be minimal). I also have the same concern as Chris on the wheels.

Does Wolfcraft have a price list somewhere? I can find their catalogs and manuals but no prices except from sone resellers.


Again, thanks for your guidance!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
First, I want to thank all of you for those great ideas in building my tv stand. Well here it is:


Dimensions: 66" (L) x 18" (H) x 20" (D), with the legs the height is 21". The two side compartments are 19" wide and the center is 25", enough for the center speaker.


Materials: 2 sheets of 4' x 8' of birch plywood from HomeDepot (they cut to size), 1" corner (L shape) trim, and 3/4" trim.


Stain: Red Mahagony (winwax??)


Finish: Polyurethane (winwax??)


Cost of materia: ~$150.


Here are the pics:


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
The first shows the darker stain. The last pics shows all the equipment and tv hooked up (love the HP md6580).


The whole project took two weeks, but if I was efficient, I could cut down to one week. Most of the time was spent waiting for the glue and stain to dry.


Forgot to mention I used 1" x 1" piieces of wood to enbrace the back for the middle section (thanks to the AVS forum). For the sides and middle verticals, I used 1/4" dowels and glue. For the legs, I used 3" x 2 1/2" x 2 1/2", and secure with dowels again.


For the middle support, I used a couple of 3" x 3/4" oak, squared up with two 2x4, and glued and screwed to the bottom. This will provide the majority of the support, as the legs are just for looks.


---TAKKL

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Don't know if anyone cares but I found a supplier of wrought iron furniture feet. I have been looking all over for this stuff since I saw it on one of the member's stands in the gallery. The link is Ferrous Hardware .


I'm having a neighbor build me a custom stand based on many of the ideas I've gotten browsing this thread. The stand will be a naturalish colored birch stand designed to hold my yet to be purchased 60+" RPTV and my Paradigm CC-470 (measuring a heathy 23" wide). Anyway check out the iron legs I think they add a nice touch. I'm going with 6 of the Elise which are only 3" tall.


I hope others can benefit from the time I spent looking for these.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Nick /forum/post/0


Grider, will four 5/8 screws into plywood be strong enough? The guy who sold me my casters said I should put a board under the plywood to thicken it and use at least a 1" screw. I'd rather not add any height to the unit, but I also don't want the screws pulling out. I'm concerned it could happen if the small wheel is sunk into the carpet when I'm trying to move it. My unit will be 79 x 24 of oak ply and will house 5 components plus a 65 inch DLP.

Sure 4 x 5/8" #10 Dome Head screw will be fine... the force on the wheels is almost 100% downward force... so there is no force trying to pull the screws out.


You do not need to add a board providing the bottom of your cabinet sits UNDER the verticals not BETWEEN the verticals. . You should try to position the wheels as close as you can under the verticals... couple of inches in from the edge is OK.


That said... drill a small pilot hole for each screw and put them in by hand (not your drill/driver) so you don't overtighten them and strip the thread in the plywood. Just snug them up hand tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
432 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by AFBear /forum/post/0


Grider, Thanks for taking the time to impart your wisdom!!!

I'm also building a similar stand but it will be a corrner stand with 3/4" plywood for the sides and maybe pegboard in the back.

My question is can one get buy with 3/8" dowels only? I'd rather not have the plugs showing (even though it would be minimal). I also have the same concern as Chris on the wheels.

Does Wolfcraft have a price list somewhere? I can find their catalogs and manuals but no prices except from sone resellers.


Again, thanks for your guidance!!!

Well you would probably be OK if you use a good quality wood glue, and more dowels (say every 3" or 4") but I'd prefer if it was supported by screws.


I'd be happier with biscuits and no screws.


Here's the Wolfcraft website:
http://www.wolfcraft.com/main.cfm

I buy mine at Home Depot.


I've used this very inexpensive dowel jig succesfully on a number of projects... stepped up to a biscuit jointer now:
http://www.wolfcraft.com/product_detail.cfm?id=81
 
661 - 680 of 1484 Posts
Top