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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This may be a stupid question, but after reading much about the fears and horror stories of burn in, I am now worried. What actually gets burnt, the lenses or the screen? And can whatever gets burnt be replaced? Is there a way to test how much brightness you have left or how much has already been lost? If you watch non-static images on max brightness/contrast what would wear out first? And my last question, what would be the aproximate costs to repair such damage?


Steve


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Seeking the answers is half the fun.


[This message has been edited by SteveHoltam (edited 04-24-2001).]
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by SteveHoltam:

This may be a stupid question, but after reading much about the fears and horror stories of burn in, I am now worried. What actually gets burnt, the lenses or the screen? And can whatever gets burnt be replaced? Is there a way to test how much brightness you have left or how much has already been lost? If you watch non-static images on max brightness/contrast what would wear out first? And my last question, what would be the aproximate costs to repair such damage?

Well, it's the phosphor aging and it's the tubes, not the screen (at least with a RPTV or FPTV.


Yes, you can replace the tubes, however you would probably have to have a technician come and set the unit up from scratch.


Cost: you would have to look up the tubes for your TV. For my Toshiba TW65H80, the tubes are $183.00 each (at Pacific Parts). Of course, having your unit re-done to work with the new tubes is going to cost something too.


I don't know how to test, except to say that if you use AVIA or VE and can get the unit calibrated to those specs, you have enough left.


Watching non-static at high contrast/brightness: hopefully, you just wouldn't do that (I have no idea what would wear out first, the whole tube(s) probably).


HTH,


Roger
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Roger. It was mainly a educational/hypothetical question. So worse case scenario would be three tubes and a service call ($183 x 3 plus $400ish) . That dosent sound "too" bad to repair a $4,000 RPTV to a brand new state. Not that I have so much money that I can just let the TV blaze and buy stock in the lens company :)


Steve


PS


Ive read that Avia a little better than Video Essentials. If I spend the $50 for this DVD, will I get my monies worth? How often do you use yours?


[This message has been edited by SteveHoltam (edited 04-24-2001).]
 

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A more accurate cost estimate would be to call an authorized service agent for your brand of set & get a quote. It's real unlikely to retube a set for $1000.


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Quote:
Originally posted by Ken H:
A more accurate cost estimate would be to call an authorized service agent for your brand of set & get a quote. It's real unlikely to retube a set for $1000.



I have to agree with Ken here. I just quoted the cost of the tubes for my set. How much a service center would charge to install and re-cal a given set is a guess at best, but I'd say Ken is probably pretty close.


Any CRT based display unit can burn in, RPTV, FPTV, Direct View (type of mask doesn't matter, it's the phosphors that burn). I think even plazma screens are subject to burn-in (anyone know for sure?).


The best advice is to pay attention to setting up your display, use AVIA or VE and get the contrast level set correctly.


Roger




[This message has been edited by Roger Clark (edited 04-25-2001).]
 
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