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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone!


My friend recently bought a new Sony 20" Wega TV. In the manual it warns about keeping static images on the screen, and putting the contrast/brightness too high.


The thing is, he's kinda paranoid. He refuses to increase the brightness or contrast to a reasonable level. It's hard to make out details in dark scenes. The brightness is set VERY low... he can still watch it, but it is difficult to make everything out.


I tried to explain to him that these steps weren't necessary... but he's paranoid nonetheless. Can anyone talk some sense into him?


Thanks,

Peter
 

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Well, I really don't know whether anyone can talk sense into someone who doesn't want to listen but . . .


Burn-in on direct views is rare unless they are really abused. The best way to prevent it is to calibrate the TV with something like AVIA . This will allow one to use a minimum contrast/picture/white level and still look very good. It is always a good idea to minimize static images such as turn the TV off if you are putting a recording on hold while going to eat, leaving the house, etc. Nevertheless, burn-in on direct view is very rare compared to other types of displays such as plasma or regular rear-projection TV. With minimal care, a direct view will probably croak before you can burn it in. Tell your friend to calibrate his TV and don't leave it on when he leaves the room (this may be overkill but you never know when the phone will ring). Then kick back, chill out, and enjoy the nice Wega. Good luck and happy viewing. :)


Rick
 

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With the contrast at or below 50% and the brightness at or below 60%, it would be nearly impossible to get burn in on a tube TV with normal usage.


Avia or Video essentials will ease his mind a little.
 

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Maybe because of different terminology, there is some confusion among what AVIA calls the "big 5":


1. contrast/picture/white levels: this is the big burn-in setting; make sure this is

2 brightness/black levels: this is the black levels and is unlikely to cause burn-in but can cause a darker picture than you may like; after calibration with AVIA, it is around half (15/32)


3. color: this is color intensity and too much can make colors glow and look strange; some units are unbalanced and push one color more than another; my sony required decreasing red push in the service menu but after adjustment the color is 15/32


4. tint/hue: according the manual, this adjusts green tones; usually you can leave this at neutral; mine is 16/32


5. sharpness: this sharpens or softens a picture but often is set too high in the showroom; after AVIA my TV looks best at 12/32


So, what do you do when you visit a friend's (or in my case my brother) and notice the TV picture is out of wack? You can discretely drop the contrast/picture/white to about 40% to 50% and make sure the brightness is no more than 50% to 60%. That will decrease risk of burn-in and should be an adequately bright picture depending on room lighting. Cutting sharpness to about 35% to 40% usually makes the picture less blurry. Color adjustments usually take some time so leave that for when you have AVIA. If this doesn't help then use the calibration disk so you know the TV isn't going bad. Hope this helps. :)


Rick
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No more than 60%? Well, that's what the TV is set to and it is very dark...


Also, he won't get AVIA. I haven't asked, but I know he won't. He would rather spend his money on something else. (I don't have AVIA either)


Thanks,

Peter
 

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Watch TV with another friend.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by peternm22


Also, he won't get AVIA. I haven't asked, but I know he won't. He would rather spend his money on something else. (I don't have AVIA either)


Thanks,

Peter
It looks like your friend doesnt care much about a good tv experience, he cares about burn in so much and then again he wont take proper steps to ensure the life of his investment and the quality of his viewing.
 

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Show him this thread. Explain to him that he is paranoid. Be logical. If he is also logical, he will understand. If he is too cheap to get Avia, get Sound & Vision's Home Theater Tuneup. It is only $15 and is more than sufficient if all you are trying to do is get correct contrast/brightness/etc settings.


And decrease ambient room light like jeff lam suggested.
 

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It sounds like what really is in question here isn't so much the TV itself, but your friends fears of ruining his brand new set. This is understandable. Ric's suggestion of AVIA is a great one, but what really should be played up to him is that this tool will enable you to set the TV's levels "correctly". Assure him that this will take the guess work of too high or too low out of the equation. When you are done with AVIA, it will be the way it is supposed to be. Let him hear the intoduction to the white level setting guide that talks about overdriving, blooming, and setting it to prevent both. This might go a long way towards putting his mind at ease.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all your suggestions.


He says he will slowly increase the brightness over time to a desirable level...


Also, the ambient light was pretty low. So I don't think that was a problem.


Does anyone know where to buy AVIA from? He might want to have a closer look at it. It can't be an online store though... that's another one of his paranoid delusions :)


Peter
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by buttonmasher
Show him this thread. Explain to him that he is paranoid. Be logical. If he is also logical, he will understand.
Is is logical to be paranoid? :)


Phil
 

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Have your friend use the THX calibrations that are found on most thx dvd's. They have brightness, contrast & color settings but they don't have the blue filter you need to set color/tint.


Jordan
 

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I think your friend needs more than an Avia calibration...
 
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