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I just realized that the house we are buying has no cable outlets in any of the 3 bedroom or family room. This house was remodeled prior to us buying it so I think that they must of just drywalled over or forgot to put the outlets back. How hard and expensive is it to add new cable outlets, I don't want holes everywhere or cable running on the floor. I checked att uverse and it said cable can be out there which leads me to believe they had cable at one point. any help? Also if we go direct tv/dish satellite service is cable outlets even needed?
 

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I think this is a case where you should try to contact the previous owners and find out what they did.


If you're willing to replace the crown molding (if any) or the baseboards, some are available which include small cable trays or conduits.


With a satellite subscription, you'll still have to run a cable from the antenna to the receiver(s) and then from the receiver(s) to the TV(s) and/or audio system.
 

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Poke your head into the attic / crawlspace and see if you can see coax lines dropping into the rooms. And every cable has another end - if that exists, at least you know they're going somewhere. Trace the wire from the service entrance, and see if you find a big splitter somewhere...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickTheGreat  /t/1521322/buying-a-home-and-there-are-no-cable-outlets-in-any-room#post_24451432


It's sinfully easy if you have attic and basement access. It's a real pain if you don't.


I'm with Seldon, it might be worth asking what happened.
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If you have to run cable, it's not really sinfully easy, depending on the situation. I ran cable in my other house, and it was freaking time consuming.


If the cable is already run, it's really not sinfully easy, either. For instance, I have access to both the attic and the basement in a house. I had to trace all the wiring I could find in the basement (several splitters, and amp, etc.), and then had to go into the attic only to discover that the original wiring no longer worked and there was a single line in the attic to one outlet. I had to tap into that and luckily could run a wire from the attic to the basement (where all the rest of the wiring existed) and tap into what I needed to do there. Luckily, even after three splitters, everything worked.
 

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You want the easiest and least messy way? Hire someone to do it.
 

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'Least messy' is open to debate. I rarely cut drywall for new cable drops; I take my time, plan it out, and work methodically. A pro would be in and out in 5 minutes with each drop, cutting drywall at every chance. Repairing drywall is cheap. AV installer is $100/hour, just like an electrician or plumber, in my area.
 

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If you have basement or attic access, then that's an option. There's also the traditional method of "wrapping" which is how a couple of outlets in the house I'm living in now were done. You just go from the service entrance point, around the outside, and then drill in on an exterior wall wherever you want the jack. It's not hard to do, and if done properly, and with the right color of cable, doesn't look too bad. This is how the MSO will usually do it, as they pretty much don't fish wires through attics or basements unless it's truly the easiest or only way to get somewhere.


DirecTV, DISH, and cable all work with home-run RG-6. Cable is sometime tolerant of RG-59 or mid-line splitters, satellite is not, and modern digital cable systems will likely act up if they don't have home-run RG-6.
 

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Technically if you sign up with Dish or Direct the installer is responsible for the cable if there is none. The problem with having us run your cable is 'you get what you pay for' and a job doesn't pay extra if we have to run cable. Basically even with the title of "contractor", most techs have little bargaining power for the price of line items. It's likely they get paid a figure for installing a dish and a receiver, then an additional figure for each additional receiver, and they are to provide cable as needed. It is pretty common to charge $15 per additional receiver. So if you think that $15 includes cable don't expect it to look amazing... they'll drill a hole straight out and wrap the cable around the house. See if an electrician will even take you seriously for offering $15 per cable run. Many techs offer wall fishing as 'custom' labor and charge accordingly to do a cleaner but more time consuming cable run. This is perfectly normal in the industry but a big complaint in the inner circle is the way that Dish and Direct so frequently and loudly advertise a free install, so people expect custom labor to be free. Some Dish employees are not contractors and earn an hourly wage and have all materials, tools, and time paid for. However they have a system of points per hour, with each job worth a certain number of points. Even with time and materials paid for, they still suffer when they have to cable because low points per hour affects promotions and raises.


So if you want it done nice you should do it yourself or pay a professional. If you want it done quick and dirty have a satellite tech do it for so little he can't afford to stay in business.
 

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My previous house had cable wrapped around the outside and it looked terrible. I ran the cable from the cable company's location, into the attic and then to a single spot. From there, I ran the cable to individual rooms and terminated the cable in a box. Since I was running cable, I also ran cat 5e (and subsequently cat6) network cable (and originally ran phone also to each room, though I should've used cat5e for that too). It looks so much better but was a freaking pain in the butt to do. I spent many hours in the attic, especially since a lot of attic had plywood on it, so I spent a bunch of time removing nails to be able to move the plywood to get to interior walls. I also ran extra lines into the attic for satellite and have a few extra cat5e/6 too.


Personally, I don't find working in the attic to be much fun. You need a mask, a long sleeved shirt, and it takes a while to determine exactly where the walls are and where you have to drill. And pulling cable sucks -- it's always getting caught and wrapped around itself or something else. On the other hand, I was running out of time before our second daughter was born and had electricians come in and do a few remaining things, and I was flabbergasted at the price. $2,000 for I think installing two 20Amp outside outlets, one set of cables and box from the attic into a room, and a 220V outlet in the garage. So, I do my own wire pulling and electrical (and get it inspected, too).


Also, if you want to go from the basement to the attic, it's even harder, as you have to find a wall that does that. You also have to ensure everything is caulked (with appropriate fire caulking if necessary).
 

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If you're not going to do it yourself then just call an electrician or A/V Installer in your area. I normally quote $75 to $100 a cable outlet without seeing the job. That's for normally installed outlets (drop from splitter in attic or up from splitter in basement.) Anything beyond that could be extra.


If you're going to do it yourself just take your time. Measure everything 5 times (you really don't want to drill through floors if you don't mean to.) Maybe invest in a $35 "flex" bit that would be in the electrical section of Home Depot or Lowes IF you're dirlling UP into a wall or down from inside a wall (cut the outlet box and drill down into a basement.) ALWAYS check and inspect the other side of where you are drilling and think LOGICALLY about the angle you are drilling at. Drill a little at a time if you have to. Remember that some drills bits are designed to PULL the bit through the wood which means if you're not careful you'll fly through the wood and then through anything else. These bits drill faster and better, but a traditional bit will not PULL the bit and you through.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ctviggen  /t/1521322/buying-a-home-and-there-are-no-cable-outlets-in-any-room/0_40#post_24455692


'


If you have to run cable, it's not really sinfully easy, depending on the situation. I ran cable in my other house, and it was freaking time consuming.


If the cable is already run, it's really not sinfully easy, either. For instance, I have access to both the attic and the basement in a house. I had to trace all the wiring I could find in the basement (several splitters, and amp, etc.), and then had to go into the attic only to discover that the original wiring no longer worked and there was a single line in the attic to one outlet. I had to tap into that and luckily could run a wire from the attic to the basement (where all the rest of the wiring existed) and tap into what I needed to do there. Luckily, even after three splitters, everything worked.

It's easier than cutting down drywall and drilling each joist, floor plate, fire-blocking, etc.
 
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