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Hi, I have an iTunes gift card and wanted to buy music. But I'm old school and have alway bought CDs, knowing it wasn't compressed I could be happy. If I buy music on iTunes, do I receive a wav file that is turned to MP3 once put on an iPod. Or does it come to me as an MP3? What's the best way to approach this while maintaining my stuck up perspective on quality source music? Thanks.
 

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It comes to you as a 256 kbps AAC file. AAC is a lossy codec like MP3, but generally superior to MP3 at lower bit rates (like 128, say).


All serious listener testing suggests that you would be very, very unlikely to hear a real difference between a 256 kbps AAC file and a WAV file of recorded music. There are sounds that are difficult for a particular codec to get right, but they aren't common in typical music. And you also probably need specific training to hear the difference.


My advice would be to use your gift card on something you might not otherwise try out, and be happy.
 

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If it's free, download it and give it a listen (hopefully with an open mind.) If you don't like it, delete the files. That simple, and you haven't lost anything. The iTunes store also has freebie songs for download (usually a new one each week), so you might try one of them out, too, if you don't want to waste your card yet.


I think Apple did away with the DRM, didn't they? Meaning the AAC files can be played on non-iPod players now.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tuxedocivic /forum/post/20863643


Tulpa, if I delete the files they refund me? Or you mean I haven't lost anything because it was a gift?

Well, you said gift card. I'm assuming you didn't pay for it yourself, right? That's why I said "if it's free" you have nothing to lose.


No, if you delete the files, it's the same as tossing a CD.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tuxedocivic /forum/post/20862938


Hi, I have an iTunes gift card and wanted to buy music. But I'm old school and have alway bought CDs, knowing it wasn't compressed I could be happy. If I buy music on iTunes, do I receive a wav file that is turned to MP3 once put on an iPod. Or does it come to me as an MP3? What's the best way to approach this while maintaining my stuck up perspective on quality source music? Thanks.

iTunes gives you AAC files. When the same bitrate is applied, AAC files are considered to give superior sound to mp3's. So a 128kbps mp3 vs AAC, the AAC is theoretically supposed to sound better.


Nothing sounds better than the .wav file, but the question is, will you notice a difference?...you would need some really high end equipment and a very trained ear to hear differences so I would download the free songs and enjoy them
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by XLR8TR /forum/post/20872897


iTunes gives you AAC files. When the same bitrate is applied, AAC files are considered to give superior sound to mp3's. So a 128kbps mp3 vs AAC, the AAC is theoretically supposed to sound better.


Nothing sounds better than the .wav file, but the question is, will you notice a difference?...you would need some really high end equipment and a very trained ear to hear differences so I would download the free songs and enjoy them

I could be wrong, but I seem to remember 256 AAC/VBR being fairly close to 320 MP3. But again, at which point do you notice a difference?
 

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^Good question, it really depends on the quality of equipment you are using, the range of the song you are playing, and how well your ear is trained.


On one of my systems, when I played really complex instrumentals, I *think* I noticed a difference up until a 256kbps MP3...after that it sounded the same. However i'm not sure, it could have just been something else. If I play regular songs, after about 192kbps it sounds the same...but then again, I don't have the most trained ear, and I am not sure if am hearing things or its just a psychological effect that I'm LOOKING for nuances in the audio.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tuxedocivic /forum/post/20862938


Hi, I have an iTunes gift card and wanted to buy music. But I'm old school and have alway bought CDs, knowing it wasn't compressed I could be happy. If I buy music on iTunes, do I receive a wav file that is turned to MP3 once put on an iPod. Or does it come to me as an MP3? What's the best way to approach this while maintaining my stuck up perspective on quality source music? Thanks.

Check this article out: http://www.pcworld.com/article/64123...ifference.html


And there are others that come to the same basic conclusions.
 
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