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I'm planning on getting HDTV signals through a cox HDTV cablebox in the So. CA area (live in a hilly area so OTA is not an option). I was wondering though, since I'm getting both HDTV cable and internet cable from Cox does that mean they share bandwith? I tend to use most of my internet bandwith at any given time and wouldn't want that to affect my picture quality on the TV.


Or do they use two completely seperate co-axil cables for the TV and internet?


Thanks,
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bebpo
I'm planning on getting HDTV signals through a cox HDTV cablebox in the So. CA area (live in a hilly area so OTA is not an option). I was wondering though, since I'm getting both HDTV cable and internet cable from Cox does that mean they share bandwith? I tend to use most of my internet bandwith at any given time and wouldn't want that to affect my picture quality on the TV.


Or do they use two completely seperate co-axil cables for the TV and internet?


Thanks,
They could use one cable run with a splitter so as long as the splitter is good enough (the ones they provide are good enough) you won't have a problem. Using the same cable for both internet and cable isn't a problem because the cable tv and internet sides used different areas of bandwidth. Say if your cable system has a total of 750Mhz of bandwidth. In this case all the cable TV stuff could be carried between 100Mhz and 600Mhz while the internet is carried between 700Mhz and 750Mhz for example. Now I know you didn't ask for this much but just thought you might want to know how it works. Also all 750Mhz of content is sent down the cable all the time so your modem would use its part coming down the cable while the cable TV would use its part. Even with one cable more than one TV/digital box can tune in everything because it only matters that the cable can send everything down. That is why I mention the info about the splitter because a bad or older splitter might only work for upto 500Mhz so each cable going out of the splitter wouldn't have anything above 500Mhz on it.


Hope this helps you out in making the right choice. Just make sure your splitter can at least output in each of its output jacks 1000Mhz or 1Ghz and you will be fine. These numbers are most likely printed directly on the splitter itself.
 

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Most cable companies require a seperate run from the side of the house directly to the cable modem without a spliter on that leg. Usually they will put it in themselves as part of the install.


Most are using 650Mhz for internet as the rolloff at 750mhz is too high to meet cable modem specs - and its such a small portion of the available bandwidth, you will have nothing to worry about. Remember most systems were not built out to 750mhz but were upgraded to 750mhz in retrofits. Some are now upgraded to 1000Mhz, but these are very few and far in between at this time - and I know of some major systems that have upgraded to 1000Mhz, but their head ends still are limited at 750Mhz - so it goes unused.
 

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Hi,


You can use both HDTV service and Cable Modem service from Cox(or any Cable Operator) simultaneously without issue. Cable Operators, like Cox in SoCal, use a principal called FDM or Frequency Division Multiplexing. FDM is actually the "stacking" of many 6 MHz wide channels together to create a "channel lineup".


Cable Modems are nothing more than a TV tuner that "tune" 1's and 0's, ie the internet, on one of the aforementioned 6 MHz channels.


The HDTV signals that you tune in at the same exact time you are using your cable modem are 100% independent because your cable modem will be using, for example, channel 100 and the HDTV will be using channel 50.


Cox in SoCal has predominately 750 MHz plants and has for some time. They even have a few at 870 MHz.


For more information on how cable modems themselves work you can read up on the DOCSIS specification at cablemodem-DOT-com
 

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The bottom line is it won't affect your picture at all. Others using Internet in your neighborhood might affect your Internet speeds, but I've never noticed that effect myself (and in any case, cable Internet is faster that DSL in my area, and so fast it would have to be slowed down quite a bit to notice).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bebpo
I tend to use most of my internet bandwith at any given time and wouldn't want that to affect my picture quality on the TV.
Don't worry, it's not a problem.
 
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