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Hi, by where I work, a Comcast subcontractor just moved. Prior to moving, one of the guys had a box of splitters, cable ties and a few odds and ends that he just gave to us. Needless to say, we all grabbed a handful of splitters and extra remotes!


I notice on the splitters that there is, of course, an IN and then various number of outputs. I noticed that some of the outs are 7.5dB and others 3.5dB, sometimes even on the same splitter. Whats this all about?
 

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The numbers represent the loss associated with that particular output and is measured in dB(decibels). A 1to2 splitter generally has a little over 3dB and a 1to4 splitter a little over 7dB. Some splitters do not split evenly to there outputs. Every time a signal is split, a weaker signal strength is the result. If enough loss is introduced, the receiver may not be able to detect the signal adequately for use. Other information on splitters would include the frequency range which it is able to pass, such as 80-1000Mhz and whether it will pass a DC voltage for pre-amp or lnb polarizer control.
 

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A spec sheet for the splitter can be found here . The numbers mean that it will pass frequencies between 5 and 1000Mhz and its RFI(radio frequency interference) shielding rating is 130dB. It looks like a decent splitter for cable and ota use.


However, the specs indicate that blocking capacitors are attached to all ports. I believe this means that it will not pass a DC voltage. DC voltages are used for powering antenna preamps and for selecting multiswitch ports and polarization on satellite antenna lnbs. They can not be used in these applications.
 
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