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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a HD 16:9 TV that has component and S Video inputs. I ran RG6 coax to the TV.


1. Does the coax need to be digital serial coax or is plenum rated RG 6 Quad acceptable for a HD feed?


2. Are compression F to RCA connectors ok to use?


3. Should I run the cables directly to the TV or use a wall panel, ie. Leviton Quickport and interconnects to the TV?


4. Is there a F to SVideo compession fitting or do I have to use an adaptor to go from RCA to SVideo?


Thanx,
 

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1. Any coax with 75 ohm characteristic impedance will work. So any flavor of RG6 will work. Plenum cable is fine. The only difference is that the jacket of plenum cable is more fire resistant. This kind of jacket is typically required by electrical codes when the cable is to be run through a plenum (cold air return) of a HVAC system.


2. Compression connectors are fine. Better to go straight to RCA. But I don't think you would see a difference.


3. At the very least running the cable straight into the wall might be inconvenient if you needed to move something. FWIW I have Leviton Quickport connectors on the wall. I use the BNC type, with 75 ohm BNC connectors on the wall end of the cables. F connectors would work. I wouldn't use RCA because they aren't designed to match the characteristic impedance of the cable.


4. Not aware of a F to S-video fitting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm
1. Any coax with 75 ohm characteristic impedance will work. So any flavor of RG6 will work. Plenum cable is fine. The only difference is that the jacket of plenum cable is more fire resistant. This kind of jacket is typically required by electrical codes when the cable is to be run through a plenum (cold air return) of a HVAC system.


2. Compression connectors are fine. Better to go straight to RCA. But I don't think you would see a difference.


3. At the very least running the cable straight into the wall might be inconvenient if you needed to move something. FWIW I have Leviton Quickport connectors on the wall. I use the BNC type, with 75 ohm BNC connectors on the wall end of the cables. F connectors would work. I wouldn't use RCA because they aren't designed to match the characteristic impedance of the cable.


4. Not aware of a F to S-video fitting.
Colm -


I'm confused.


Point #2 you say "Better to go straight to RCA." But then in point #3 you say "I wouldn't use RCA because they aren't designed to match the characteristic impedance of the cable."


So do I use compression RCA's or not?


Thanx,
 

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A. Plenum is not more fire resistant. When it burns, it just does not emit toxic fumes.


B. I think what he is saying is that if your TV has an RCA input, make the cable end with an RCA connector. However, if using a wall plate to connect through, use BNC or F as they are far better connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dizzman
A. Plenum is not more fire resistant. When it burns, it just does not emit toxic fumes.


B. I think what he is saying is that if your TV has an RCA input, make the cable end with an RCA connector. However, if using a wall plate to connect through, use BNC or F as they are far better connectors.
So, if using a wallplate, what connector should be used at the back of the plate and what connector should be used at the front of the plate?


Why are BNC or F connectors better than RCA? Is it the the actual fastening method - push n twist (BNC) or screw on (F) instead of push on (RCA)?
 

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The primary reason for the different materials in plenum cable is indeed to minimized spread of smoke through the building via plenums. This is possible because plenum cable is more fire resistant. That is not to say it will not burn. It just doesn't spread the flame as fast as materials used in non-plenum cables and generates less smoke. It still generates toxic gases.


Use the same kind of connector, BNC or F, on both sides of the plate. I don't think you will have a choice to use on kind of one side, and another on the other side. At least I haven't seen plates or keystones with a BNC on one side and and F or the other.


75 ohm BNC and F connectors are better than RCA because they match the 75 ohm characteristic impedance of the cable. No RCA connector made is a good match. The geometry does not permit it. However, a few that are better than most (closer impedance match). Canare sells one. Any mismatch in impedance will cause a reflection of part of the signal back down the cable if the cable is more than a significant fraction of the wavelength of the signal, which in this case it is. This will degrade the signal. With analog video or RF signal this will show up as ghosts.


You don't have a choice but to use an RCA connector at the set if that is what it accepts. The reason for not using an adapter is twofold. First, the fewer connections the more reliable the connection. Second, the fewer the connections, at least in this case, the fewer internal signal reflections.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Colm -


So can you recommend a preference for these choices? Aesthetics are not a concern - pix quality is. Or is the difference so minimal, that I should do whatever is easiest?


1. Wallplates with F on each side and then a coax interconnect with F on the wallplate end and RCA on the TV side?


2. Forget wallplates and go directly with coax and RCA ends to the TV?
 

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All things being the same, your second option is pretty much guaranteed to give you the best signal. That said, I don't think you would be able to see a difference between the two options. If it were my house, I would go with your first option, just for the convenience. Actually, I have BNC connectors on the wall.
 
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