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Amp rated 300 watts into 4 ohms (it is a one channel amp). Using 6 bass shakers rated at 50 watts each @ 4 ohms, am I OK running the following series/parallel scheme? Running 4 shakers in series (back row) and running another two in series in the front row. The two series setups would be connected in parallel to the amp. I am pretty sure this delivers 16 ohms to the back and 2 ohms to the front, but when set in parallel, this would deliver an effective 8 ohm load on the amp, is this correct? Would this also deliver proper wattage to the shakers?
 

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Amp rated 300 watts into 4 ohms (it is a one channel amp). Using 6 bass shakers rated at 50 watts each @ 4 ohms, am I OK running the following series/parallel scheme? Running 4 shakers in series (back row) and running another two in series in the front row. The two series setups would be connected in parallel to the amp. I am pretty sure this delivers 16 ohms to the back and 2 ohms to the front, but when set in parallel, this would deliver an effective 8 ohm load on the amp, is this correct? Would this also deliver proper wattage to the shakers?
Sorry but your math doesn't match your description very well.

Having four 4 Ohm shakers in series for the back row does indeed add up to 16 Ohms, but the two 4 Ohm shakers in series for the front row doesn't make 2 Ohms, it makes 8 Ohms.
Putting 16 Ohms in parallel with 8 Ohms equals 5.33 Ohms.

Sure, 5.33 Ohms is quite close to the 4 Ohm rating of the amplifier, but the distribution of power is not going to be spread equally amongst the shakers if they're hooked up that way.
I calculate the maximum power available for the rear shakers will be ~18.75W each, whereas the front shakers will see ~75W each.

Sorry but I couldn't think of a wiring connection scheme that would end up providing exactly 50W of power to every shaker.
So you'll either have to accept that every shaker will have to get less than 50W of power each, or you can create an amplifier load that's less than 4 Ohms and risk having the amplifier clip or shut down to protect itself.

If you can live with only providing ~33W per shaker, you can create a 6 Ohm load in two different ways.
Either:
- make two groups of three shakers tied together in series, and then connect those two groups together in parallel, or,
- make three groups of two shakers tied together in parallel, and then connect all three groups together in series.
Either connection method will work.

If you want to risk overloading the amplifier, you can create a 2.6 Ohm load by making three groups of two shakers tied together in series, and then connect all three groups together in parallel.
That should get you ~75W per shaker, if the amplifier can handle it.
 
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