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Hello, when I calibrate my 5.1 speaker setup I get much different results using my Onkyo receiver than with Avia test disk. If I were to guess I would say that the receiver is more accurate. because after calibration, the speaker levels are across the board with the disk. When I check them with the receiver`s test tones, (with an SPL meter) they are off. Is this normal? which should I stay with.


While I`m here I would just like to ask if I`m doing it right. I put my volume on #1 REF on the receiver #2after hearing tones from AVIA disk go back inside receiver`s menu and raise (or lower) calibration of that specific speaker #3 go back to disk and check to spl until it`s 80 db while while the whole time keeping my receiver volume on REF Is this correct?
 

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I am not familiar with your receiver, but I'll guess the test is set at 75db. Avia test tones are recorded at 85dB and a dialognorm is applied reducing the level by 4dB. Compare the sound levels with the receiver calibrated using the internal test tones. If your receiver has the normal 75dB test tone then the Avia test tone should read 81dB. Check it out and see what happens.


check out the article in Secrets of Home Theater and High Fidelity on dialognorm. http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...on-6-2000.html

Quote:
Myth #2: Dialnorm reduces everything by 4 dB, altering reference level playback of a movie.


A common criticism is that Dialogue Normalization "normally" reduces the level of the soundtrack by about 4 dB. Reduces it as compared to what? You have to compare it to something else first, and then the question becomes: is the Dolby Digital soundtrack 4 dB too low, or is the other material 4 dB too high? Follow me on this one.


A lot of home theater enthusiasts are concerned with what is called "reference level playback". In a nutshell, you use test-tones (as may be found on such DVDs as AVIA) to set the volume to the same standard levels used in cinemas (a.k.a.: loud!). The reason to do this is to hear the soundtrack at the level the movie makers intended. A concern naturally arises that if volume is being altered by Dialnorm, the sound engineer's vision is compromised. Reference level playback is in practice very very loud in the relatively small acoustic spaces of home, and we must caution you against it at this point. Not only do most find it uncomfortably loud, but as we noted in our article explaining the LFE channel, it can quickly bring a subwoofer to its knees. But for the record, let's press on.


The default power-on setting for Dialnorm on Dolby's professional AC-3 encoder, the DP569, is -27 because as we noted, that value is a perfect fit for movie soundtracks. True, this value calls for your decoder to attenuate its output by 4 dB. Fact is, the two most common reference DVDs, Video Essentials and AVIA, were encoded with the same -27 Dialnorm value, so their test noises are also being attenuated by 4 dB, making them a perfect reference for Dolby Digital movies. If you've set-up a system with either of these tools, then any movie you play will not be "reduced" by 4 dB as compared to the reference.


DTS soundtracks, unlike Dolby Digital, are not attenuated by 4 dB by your decoder. This means that if you've set up your system using AVIA or Video Essentials, the DTS soundtrack is actually going to play 4 dB too high. Yes, that's right. You read it here: On a system calibrated for reference level playback with Video Essentials or AVIA, DTS soundtracks play 4 dB too loud. Conversely (and to be fair), if you set up a system using DTS test noise, the Dolby Digital soundtrack will be 4 dB too low. Yet what is important here, and what I really want you to take away from this, is that regardless of what actual level you watch a movie at, relative to one another, there exists this 4 dB difference between DTS and Dolby Digital movie soundtracks played over consumer equipment. If at any time you are comparing soundtracks, you must turn your volume down when listening to the DTS track and/or raise it when listening to the Dolby Digital track (as the case may be) in order to hear the same level from both.
 
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