AVS Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,330 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have my system optimized for multichannel music in my 15 x 27 room. My front speakers are located 9' out into the room (the 1/3 mark) while the couch is at 18' (the 2/3 mark). All speakers, including the Bag End 18 subwoofer, are calibrated to 75 db using my Lexicon preamp's internal test tones.


Music sounds fantastic.


But this is also my main home theater room.


When watching a movie with the Lex volume set to 0, the sound is wonderful and loud, very loud, but I sometimes think I am missing some subwoofer boom. I mean, my pants do not flap and the windows do not rattle, although it is obvious that there is a subwoofer operating.


Can this be because the sub is located against the front wall between the speakers making it 17' away and too far from the listening position?


I could move it closer to a side wall firing into the room about 4' in front of the couch or move it directly behind and firing away from the couch toward the back wall 9' away? (Moving it would not put it directly in line with me to feel the air.)


I would hate to upset the balance I now have for music listening.


How have any of you dealt with a room used for critical music listening as well as home theater?


Thanks.


Shelly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I calibratated my system with the Realistic spl meter (readings adjusted as per the SVS subwoofer site recommendations), and the Sterophile audio test cd warble tones. At this point everything sounds great on music, but some dvd's are have almost too much low end, ie U571. I will be going into my yamaha rxv2200 menu to lower the bass channel when playing dolby 5.1 material.

How does your system sound when playing the THX sweeping synthesized

audio intro.? That's a good quick check for subwoofwer integration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,209 Posts
The Radio Shack sound meter is notoriously inaccurate at low frequencies. Be sure to check out one of the calibration tables available on past AVS threads to get an idea of how you should adjust the reading from the sound meter. I calibrated my system using a GoldLine RTA with 1/12 octave resolution. Obviously this is not a possibility for most people and the RS sound meter will do an adequate job provided you are aware of its limitations and make the appropriate adjustments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,330 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The THX sweep is the part of the movies that my wife likes the best. She had even asked me to play it again before the movie begins. It can be felt in our bodies.


But my concern is with explosions and other loud parts of movies. Although I can feel them, I have been elsewhere where I have jumped off my seat or have seen my pants legs flapping. Both times where in much smaller rooms and where I was closer to the sub.


I do use the corrections for the RS meter when I use the SterephileTest Disc tones. With the correction applied, my 200-->20 readout is almost flat (+/-2) except for a larger suckout at 31.5hz. I used these tones to find the volume level setting for the sub (between 1 and 2). This same volume level made the sub read at 75db as well when I used the Lex's internal test tones to calibrate all the speakers to 75db.


If I turn up the sub's volume level to mid way (5), things bounce in the room but I can't listen to music because of the exagerrated bass.


I read that SVS recomends that their subs be turned up to 80%. How can this be? Or are turned up subs not used for music listening?


I do appreciate the feedback and hope there is more.


Shelly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
635 Posts
Shelly,

Does your HT processor allow you to adjust the level of the subwoofer.

I find that for music I have it set to 0 and for HT I raise the level to plus 5.

All done from my remote control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,229 Posts
I recently added a second vtf-2 to my setup & while I noticed a difference, I still didnt have the "pants flapping" bass. I set up my subs using VE & the Rat Shack meter-I had it set +4db hot(79db), but the bass wasnt really there. I then upped my sub level on my receiver another 4db & BAM, the room shaking bass appeared. Im surprised how much more over "reference" i had to set my sub. I am aware of the SPL meter & how it can be off with low frequencies, but I calibrated using the VE tone & am not sure what frequency it puts out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,330 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Using the preamp to raise the sub's level seems to be the thing to do.


I read a recent review of the newest Hsu sub where the reviewer felt he was not getting the oomph after properly calibrating the sub, so he raised it's level 5db with his Anthem 20 processor.


This is the first time that I heve read a review of a sub where the reviewer actually talked about the volume level. Most sub reviews talk about 112db at 20hz et al so I know that they have the sub cranked way up toward its maximum output.


Properly calibrated, I can't imagine any sub doing what we want them to do, i.e., flap our pants and rattle our windows.


So having two different levels, one properly calibrated for music and one boosted 5-9db or more for video is what is needed.


Shelly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,540 Posts
Movies have more very low bass than music, typically, I think. So maybe you need to juice up the lower frequencies from your sub, which might be doable by lowering its crossover and turning up its volume (depending on how you're set up).
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top